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Barometric Pressure: When did it become MB's?
Mee | Me

Posted on 03/14/2014 6:37:20 PM PDT by PROCON

When the Heck did the weather people quit reporting on the barometer? I remember how important the barometric pressure was to the weather folks, but now they're hardly touching on it, and are reporting it in millabars? I still have a wall thingy that shows the temperature, the humidity AND THE BAROMETRIC PRESSURE starting at about 28 and going to about 32. Low numbers meaning bad weather, higher numbers meaning nicer weather. Am I crazy or has anyone else noticed this too. Sheesh, maybe I have too much time on my hands, but just saying.....


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Just curious if other FReepers have noticed this phenomenom, BTW, I live in Oregon.
1 posted on 03/14/2014 6:37:20 PM PDT by PROCON
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To: PROCON

Millibars are SI units.

1 millibar = 0.0295333727 inches of mercury.

Your old one is in inches of mercury. SI is a little more accurate but overall functionally the same.

I haven’t noticed the weather idiots talking about millibars but then again once they signed on to AGW I stopped listening to them and now read my own maps from intellicast.


2 posted on 03/14/2014 6:41:54 PM PDT by Ouderkirk (To the left, everything must evidence that this or that strand of leftist theory is true)
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To: PROCON

National Weather Service still reports barometric pressure in inches.


3 posted on 03/14/2014 6:42:09 PM PDT by jjotto ("Ya could look it up!")
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To: PROCON

The weather report has been dumbed-down, just like most of the news.


4 posted on 03/14/2014 6:42:45 PM PDT by smokingfrog ( sleep with one eye open (<o> ---)
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To: PROCON

BTW, it’s 1056 millibars here today, whatever that means...


5 posted on 03/14/2014 6:43:14 PM PDT by PROCON (Those who are capable of Tyranny are capable of Deceit to sustain it.)
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To: PROCON

I was brought up on both.


6 posted on 03/14/2014 6:43:44 PM PDT by Sirius Lee (All that is required for evil to advance is for government to do "something")
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To: PROCON
Good evening, Army Bro! I have no clue what a millibar is - I know what an inch is. I think this change occurred at the beginning of the Clinton Administration - when just about everything else in our Beloved Nation went to Hell.



America demands Justice for the Fallen of Benghazi!

O stranger, tell the Lacedaemonians that we lie here, obedient to their command.

Listen, O isles, unto me; and hearken, ye people, from far; The LORD hath called me from the womb; from the bowels of my mother hath he made mention of my name. (Isaiah 49:1 KJV)

7 posted on 03/14/2014 6:44:29 PM PDT by ConorMacNessa (HM/2 USN, 3/5 Marines RVN 1969 - St. Mlichael the Archangel defend us in Battle!)
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To: PROCON

8 posted on 03/14/2014 6:44:38 PM PDT by smokingfrog ( sleep with one eye open (<o> ---)
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To: Ouderkirk
Millibars are SI units.

Do you mean metric units?

9 posted on 03/14/2014 6:46:39 PM PDT by Fiji Hill
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To: ConorMacNessa

Navy Bro, the Clintonista regime definately tried to dumb us down, didn’t work on us FReepers :-)


10 posted on 03/14/2014 6:47:59 PM PDT by PROCON (Those who are capable of Tyranny are capable of Deceit to sustain it.)
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To: Fiji Hill

SI = System International

Le Système international d’unités


11 posted on 03/14/2014 6:50:55 PM PDT by EEGator
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To: PROCON

I measure everything in my own unique way.

12 posted on 03/14/2014 6:52:04 PM PDT by ClearCase_guy
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To: ConorMacNessa; PROCON

Millie’s Bar was a place back home where we all went to drink after work.


13 posted on 03/14/2014 6:52:20 PM PDT by GreyFriar (Spearhead - 3rd Armored Division 75-78 & 83-87)
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To: Fiji Hill

SI units are the International System of Units. Basically after WWII, the science community got tired of all the different systems of measurement, including different nations using different metric systems. So, they consolidated everything so that moles, meters, degrees K, etc all meant the same thing for everybody.


14 posted on 03/14/2014 6:54:15 PM PDT by Ophiucus
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To: Fiji Hill
Actually, the bar (and “millibar”) aren’t part of the metric system. The pascal is the metric unit of pressure. One bar is supposed to be equivalent to atmospheric pressure at sea level (one atmosphere). In 1982, though, the IUPAC standardized the bar at 100 kilopascals.
15 posted on 03/14/2014 6:56:13 PM PDT by Olog-hai
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To: ClearCase_guy

The weather rock has proven to be a reliable weather indicator.

If the rock is wet, it’s raining.
If the rock is swinging, the wind is blowing.
If the rock casts a shadow, the sun is shining.
If the rock does not cast a shadow and is not wet, the sky is cloudy.
If the rock is not visible, it is foggy.
If the rock is white, it is snowing.
If the rock is coated with ice, there is a frost.
If the ice is thick, it’s a heavy frost.
If the rock is bouncing, there is an earthquake.
If the rock is under water, there is a flood.
If the rock is warm, it is sunny.
If the rock is missing, there was a tornado.
If the rock is wet and swinging violently, there is a hurricane.
If the rock has white splats on it, watch out for birds.


16 posted on 03/14/2014 6:57:43 PM PDT by stars & stripes forever (Blessed is the nation whose God is the Lord.)
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To: Ophiucus

Just because someone calls something “international” doesn’t necessarily make it so. In the USA, it’s called the metric system.

And frankly, the bar is not “SI”; it’s actually considered deprecated by those scientists.


17 posted on 03/14/2014 6:57:47 PM PDT by Olog-hai
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To: PROCON

BTW, it’s 1056 millibars here today, whatever that means…

How much is that in bit coin


18 posted on 03/14/2014 7:00:18 PM PDT by al baby (Hi MomÂ… I was refereeing to Obama)
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To: GreyFriar

LOL, and I’m raising a beer in your honor right now, my FRiend. :-)


19 posted on 03/14/2014 7:00:50 PM PDT by PROCON (Those who are capable of Tyranny are capable of Deceit to sustain it.)
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To: stars & stripes forever
My daughter -- who was old enough to know better -- was baffled by the weather rock. She read the instructions very carefully and honestly looked forward to see if the rock could effectively carry out its appointed tasks.

Sigh.

She's in college now, so she eventually turned out OK.

20 posted on 03/14/2014 7:01:31 PM PDT by ClearCase_guy
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To: Ophiucus

Back in the 1970’s, when President Carter was trying to get us to adopt the metric system, Chicago Tribune columnist Bob Greene started a movement called We Ain’t Metric. “Why won’t we adopt the metric system?” he asked—”beacause we don’t like it. Why won’t we cooperate with the federal government’s efforts to get us to use it? Because we don’t want to.”

I was, and am in full agreement.


21 posted on 03/14/2014 7:02:49 PM PDT by Fiji Hill
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To: PROCON

I deal with progressive idiologues in some of my hobbies.

I’ve noticed they throw metric units around in conversation like a social climber drops names - to impress.


22 posted on 03/14/2014 7:05:47 PM PDT by llevrok (F the government)
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To: ClearCase_guy

A lot of college kids would have that reaction nowadays


23 posted on 03/14/2014 7:06:51 PM PDT by GeronL (Vote for Conservatives not for Republicans!)
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To: Olog-hai

kPa, all the way.


24 posted on 03/14/2014 7:07:05 PM PDT by Paladin2
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To: Fiji Hill

Bump


25 posted on 03/14/2014 7:08:30 PM PDT by GeronL (Vote for Conservatives not for Republicans!)
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To: PROCON

Standard air pressure is 29.92 in Hg or 1013.25Mb of pressure or 1 Bar.


26 posted on 03/14/2014 7:12:48 PM PDT by Jack Hydrazine (Pubbies = national collectivists; Dems = international collectivists; We need a second party!)
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To: Ouderkirk

Metric (SI) vs. US customary units.

Neither one is more or less accurate. But SI is a LOT more logical and consistent. Easier to use once you are familiar with it.


27 posted on 03/14/2014 7:38:26 PM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: PROCON

When did the toilet paper rolls become much narrower that the holders.

And the cardboard go from thick and sturdy to thin as paper?

Been a long time since I saw a roll of TP that didnt wobble due to the core being deformed.


28 posted on 03/14/2014 7:40:16 PM PDT by Gasshog (These introductions of non-native species have consequences, like allowing Obama back into the U.S.)
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To: Gasshog

Just how fast do you get that Sukker to spin up?


29 posted on 03/14/2014 7:42:26 PM PDT by Paladin2
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To: stars & stripes forever

30 posted on 03/14/2014 7:46:18 PM PDT by dr_lew
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To: Paladin2

Real Cardboard Cereal boxes and toilet paper rolls.
Ah those were the Good Ol Days.

I guess things have to go to pot so us oldsters can use that saying.


31 posted on 03/14/2014 7:48:03 PM PDT by Gasshog (These introductions of non-native species have consequences, like allowing Obama back into the U.S.)
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To: PROCON
I remember back in grade school, when they started trying to teach us the metric system, which up until then, had not been taught in U.S. public schools before. The teaches were very insistent that we had to learn the metric system, because it was what they used in Europe. Even then (mid-1970's), at 10 or 11, we were all like, "Whatever. Who gives a crap what they use in Europe? I'll worry about that when/if I go there."

Not long after that, you started seeing metric units on cereal boxes and soda cans, etc. But really, apart from one and two liter soda bottles, what metric unit does anyone in the U.S. actually know or care about?

How many kilos do you weigh? How many liters of gas does your car hold? How many kilometers is it to work?

Almost 40 years later, and despite the efforts of the moron education establishment, the answer, with a few exceptions, is, "Who gives a crap?"

Millibars? Please. Give it to me in inches of Hg, Jacques.

32 posted on 03/14/2014 7:57:41 PM PDT by Sicon ("All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others." - G. Orwell)
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To: Paladin2

LOL. When ya gotta go ya gotta, go.


33 posted on 03/14/2014 8:00:41 PM PDT by Lurkina.n.Learnin (This is not just stupid, we're talking Democrat stupid here.)
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To: Sicon

Did you know that an inch is defined to be 2.54 cm ? Then the mile is exactly 5280 X 12 X 2.54 cm = 1609344 mm, exactly. So hey! How metric can you get?


34 posted on 03/14/2014 8:12:18 PM PDT by dr_lew
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To: EEGator

“Le Système international d’unités”

...always the French.


35 posted on 03/14/2014 8:21:51 PM PDT by PLMerite
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To: All

Millibars are the familiar unit for people in weather forecasting. Weather maps have been issued in 4 or 5 mb contours for at least half a century and probably longer. People in the weather business talk to each other in millibars and not inches or mm of mercury. If you were in any given weather office, private or government, you would hear people talking about for example a 965 low meaning it had a central pressure of 965 millibars.

All you really need to know about millibars is that 1013 is the global average and anything over 1040 is quite high, anything under 960 is quite low. I do have a home barometer that measures in inches so I’m used to making conversions in my head. This has probably been stated earlier in this thread, but 1000 millibars equals 29.53 inches and so 1050 millibars, about the highest pressure most people see in an average winter, would be 5% higher. That would add 5 x .295 inches or 1.48 inches rounded off, so in other words 31.01 inches and I think you’ll find that your home barometer shows this as being fairly high. A very deep low at 950 mbs would then be an equal amount lower, or 28.05 inches.

Sometimes in metric countries you will hear pressure given as kilopascals, these are scaled like millibars but ten times smaller so that 1000 millibars would be 100 kilopascals. So if you ever hear that type of pressure reading just multiply it by 10 to convert to millibars.

That typhoon last November in the Phillipines reached a minimum pressure of about 890 millibars. You can see why weather people prefer it, the relativity aspect is very obvious since the mean is more or less 1000 millibars.


36 posted on 03/14/2014 8:27:04 PM PDT by Peter ODonnell (It wasn't this cold before global warming)
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To: PROCON

I suspect it’s because, with satellites, the barometer now is far less important as a predictor of storms.

Also, millibars is Metric, so this is a way to promote the values of the French Revolution and Globalism.


37 posted on 03/14/2014 8:30:26 PM PDT by Arthur McGowan
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To: Jack Hydrazine; Olog-hai

I’m so glad somebody posted this question.

My brain is geared to Imperial measure, with the exception of small dimensions, where I’m finding millimeters and 10ths of that preferable to fractions of inches. I like metric bolts sizes better too. But, beyond 2 centimeters, my comprehension flies apart.

I’m trying to get hold of this stuff: inches of mercury and bars and millibars and atmospheres so let me see if I’ve got it right:
1. a bar is more than one thousand millibars (Bartender!)
2. one atmosphere is 1000 millibars
3. one atmosphere or 1000 millibars is just a smidgen shy of thirty inches mercury, or at least it used to be, but
4. a bar without Milli is a little bit more. (Or have I got it bass-ackwards?)
5.These are the atmospheric conditions of your average day at the beach, something only a French scientist could screw up.

My question follows.


38 posted on 03/14/2014 8:34:19 PM PDT by tsomer
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To: Peter ODonnell

I should add that in weather forecasting, all pressures are converted to sea level. If you live some significant elevation above sea level, your actual pressure will be a lot lower than the sea level pressure on the weather map, and your home barometer may or may not be showing that. The best way to check is to wait for a time of slack high pressure when your local TV station pressure (whether given in inches or millibars) will be the same as yours even if you’re some distance away. The same “sea level” pressure, that is. To give some idea, the upper air reports given from radiosonde balloons are given not at standard heights but when the balloon gets to standard pressures of 850, 700, 500, 300 and 250 mbs. The 850 mb maps that are then derived from those observations average about 1,500 metres above sea level which is about 5,000 feet give or take. The 500 mb maps are at an average height of 5,500 metres which is close to 18k feet. So if you live in the plains states you might be at some elevation almost up to 850 mb, which means your actual outside air pressure is really 900 mb when the sea level reading is 1000 mb. If you live in the Great Basin you could be up around 750-800 mb. At the top of the highest peaks in the Rockies you are close to 600 mb and when you’re at cruising altitude in a jet plane the outside pressure is about 200 mb. No wonder they have to pressurize jet aircraft.


39 posted on 03/14/2014 8:35:07 PM PDT by Peter ODonnell (It wasn't this cold before global warming)
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To: All

I think to be more precise, millibars are neither metric nor Imperial measure. They are arbitrary units chosen so that reporting would be relative to some implied average. When chosen, it was probably not known that the average global pressure was actually 1013 rather than 1000.

The metric measurement of air pressure would be mm of mercury and there, 760 mm is similar to 30 inches.

The use of millibars is not some new thing that has crept into usage recently. Weather maps from the 1940s were drawn up in millibars too.


40 posted on 03/14/2014 8:38:33 PM PDT by Peter ODonnell (It wasn't this cold before global warming)
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To: tsomer

You got it right.


41 posted on 03/14/2014 8:38:58 PM PDT by Jack Hydrazine (Pubbies = national collectivists; Dems = international collectivists; We need a second party!)
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To: PROCON

I, also, live in Oregon.

That Weather thingy that you have hanging on your wall will give you an idea of the weather to come.

It doesn’t really matter what it says (calibration not needed). What really matters is the amount of change. I keep a daily log with the high/low temps, amount of rain in the last 24 hours, and barometetric pressure (by my scale). After a few decades in my present location, I can, actually, out-guess the professional weather-guessers.

Wish the best to you.


42 posted on 03/14/2014 8:39:01 PM PDT by HippyLoggerBiker (Always carry a flagon of whiskey in case of snakebite and furthermore always carry a small snake.)
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To: llevrok

I worked with the Air Weather Service for a few years, some in Germany.

Some things were coded in meters, some in feet. Weird. Altimeter settings were reported in ins, because of he US altimeters. Visibility was meters, clouds were in feet. Temps in celsius. We had a mercurial barometer that was in MB’s.

When sending up weather balloons, we reported in MB’s.

I’m still mixed up, but can run well with the metric droppers.


43 posted on 03/14/2014 8:40:15 PM PDT by Loud Mime (Character matters for those who understand the concept)
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To: Peter ODonnell

Thank you sir.


44 posted on 03/14/2014 8:41:02 PM PDT by Robert A. Cook, PE (I can only donate monthly, but socialists' ABBCNNBCBS continue to lie every day!)
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To: Peter ODonnell

Good point about the conversion to sea level. It’s important, and I forgot about that.


45 posted on 03/14/2014 8:42:09 PM PDT by Loud Mime (Character matters for those who understand the concept)
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To: Sicon
I remember back in grade school, when they started trying to teach us the metric system, which up until then, had not been taught in U.S. public schools before. The teaches were very insistent that we had to learn the metric system, because it was what they used in Europe. Even then (mid-1970's), at 10 or 11, we were all like, "Whatever. Who gives a crap what they use in Europe? I'll worry about that when/if I go there."

The school was pushing the metric system when I was in third grade. Teacher said not to worry too much about learning quarts and inches and so on because soon we'd be converting to the metric system.

That was back in 1963.

46 posted on 03/14/2014 8:43:59 PM PDT by pigsmith
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To: PROCON

Sorry, forgot to mention:

A “Milli-Bar” is a unit of atmospheric pressure equal to one thousandth of a bar. Standard atmospheric pressure at sea level (around 14.7 lbs/square inch) is about 1,013 millibars.

You are right, the local weatherman rarely mentions barometric pressure. They just talk about a “High” or “Low” pressure system moving through the region...blah, blah, blah.

Again, wish you well.


47 posted on 03/14/2014 8:47:53 PM PDT by HippyLoggerBiker (Always carry a flagon of whiskey in case of snakebite and furthermore always carry a small snake.)
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To: Arthur McGowan; Jack Hydrazine; Olog-hai

Thanks for your input.

Now my question, but first one final tangent:

I’m a woodworker and do marquetry. I use veneers that are .6 and .3 mm s in thickness, and I dye these to assure color permanence. I have a vacuum pump that will pull around 24” of mercury and sometimes I use that to force the dye all the way through the wood. I hate the noise that pump makes,so I’ve adopted another method.

The new method involves quart mason jars 3/4 full of dye,into which I plunge the veneer. Then I put the jar in the microwave to heat the dye. Once the dye is boiling I put the lid on it and screw the ring tight and take everything out of the kitchen (I always do this when the wife is out). Then I stash the sealed jars and forget about them for a few hours.

When I return to my jar stash, they’ve cooled to room temp and created a vacuum that infuses the veneers with the dyes. This method is just as reliable the vacuum pump.

I’ve been trying to figure out how much vacuum pressure is in those jars once the water cools to around 70f. I know some of it is caused by the liquid, but most is due to vapor condensation— in other words, the 8 ounce empty volume is creating most of the vacuum.

Would anybody care to take the time, or suggest where I could find the info? Yes, I ought to know this, but I was probably asleep that day in school...


48 posted on 03/14/2014 9:04:39 PM PDT by tsomer
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To: jjotto

Both:
http://www.srh.noaa.gov/data/obhistory/KNRB.html


49 posted on 03/14/2014 9:10:31 PM PDT by larryjohnson (USAF(Ret))
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To: tsomer

Good question. You’re pulling 24” Hg of vacuum and then allowing it cool which will increase the vacuum but by how much?

You need the GayLussac Law for the answer.

The expression Gay-Lussac’s law is used for each of the two relationships named after the French chemist Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac and which concern the properties of gases, though it is more usually applied to his law of combining volumes, the first listed here. The first law relates to volumes before and after a chemical reaction while the second concerns the pressure and temperature relationship for a sample of gas often known as Amontons’ Law.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gay-Lussac%27s_law#Pressure-temperature_law

Pretty easy to figure out once you know the boiling temperature where you live.


50 posted on 03/14/2014 9:20:35 PM PDT by Jack Hydrazine (Pubbies = national collectivists; Dems = international collectivists; We need a second party!)
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