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Post script? Parents, lawmakers fear cursive becoming lost art
Fox News ^ | March 14, 2014 | Cristina Corbin

Posted on 03/15/2014 10:41:36 AM PDT by Olog-hai

Kids can text on tiny keyboards, convey their thoughts in 140 characters or less and use numbers for prepositions, but some states fear they soon may not be able to sign their own names.

In this digital age of Internet acronyms, like “LOL,” and emoticons, Tennessee is the latest state pressing for legislation that mandates students learn cursive writing in school. Lawmakers in the state are pushing for passage of House Bill 1697, which would require all public school students to learn how to read and write in cursive, preferably by the third grade.

The bill, authored by state Republican Rep. Sheila Butt, is meant to prevent a decline in students’ ability to read handwritten notes and sign their own names as well as interpret historical documents in their original form, like the Declaration of Independence.

“Cursive writing is timeless because it connects us to our past,” Butt told FoxNews.com. …

(Excerpt) Read more at foxnews.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Chit/Chat; Education; Society
KEYWORDS: academicbias; americaindecline; commiecore; commoncore; cursive; dumbingdown; handwriting; naughtyteacherslist; obamalegacy; revisionisthistory; scriptwriting; secretcode
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1 posted on 03/15/2014 10:41:36 AM PDT by Olog-hai
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To: Olog-hai

Imagine the what our government will do when no one can translate the constitution


2 posted on 03/15/2014 10:43:22 AM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: Olog-hai

3 posted on 03/15/2014 10:44:18 AM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: Olog-hai

I had not considered this but the fostering the inability to read “historical documents in their original form” may have been a goal of the people who managed to quash the use of cursive in government schools.


4 posted on 03/15/2014 10:44:57 AM PDT by MeshugeMikey (Jesus came to Save not Entertain / Ground John Kerry Now!)
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To: Olog-hai

Jeantel is deeply saddened


5 posted on 03/15/2014 10:45:16 AM PDT by GeronL (Vote for Conservatives not for Republicans!)
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To: Revolting cat!

6 posted on 03/15/2014 10:46:35 AM PDT by a fool in paradise (The Texas judge's decision was to pave the way for same sex divorce for two Massachusetts women.)
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My homeschool kids are certainly learning how to write cursive. It never occurred to me that public school kids didn’t know how.


7 posted on 03/15/2014 10:50:19 AM PDT by Rio (Proud resident of the State of Jefferson)
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To: Olog-hai

Can’t read cursive, but can hear grass!


8 posted on 03/15/2014 10:56:04 AM PDT by Darksheare (Try my coffee, first one's free..... Even robots will kill for it!)
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To: Olog-hai

It is stupid to make laws requiring cursive.


9 posted on 03/15/2014 10:57:49 AM PDT by greatvikingone
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To: Olog-hai

Being left-handed, teachers screwed me up and I never have been good at it, but now after decades of typing I really have to concentrate on it when I have to sign something.

Kids 100 years ago knew how to ride horses but we didn’t pass laws forcing them to keep doing so after cars came along.

The federal gummint requiring anything in schools is stupid.


10 posted on 03/15/2014 11:02:46 AM PDT by bigbob (The best way to get a bad law repealed is to enforce it strictly. Abraham Lincoln)
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To: bigbob

Don’t see the correlation, with all due respect.

And this is Tennessee AFAICS rather than the federal government.


11 posted on 03/15/2014 11:05:31 AM PDT by Olog-hai
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To: greatvikingone
In case you have forgotten...



You can find those pics at this link.
12 posted on 03/15/2014 11:06:14 AM PDT by Jack Hydrazine (Pubbies = national collectivists; Dems = international collectivists; We need a second party!)
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To: greatvikingone

Rachel J. agrees.


13 posted on 03/15/2014 11:06:58 AM PDT by Olog-hai
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To: Olog-hai

When I was in 8th grade, I had a science teacher who used to write copious notes for us on several blackboards. He wrote in all caps — big and little caps.

I loved his class, and really admired him as a teacher. So naturally, I decided to emulate his writing (which I thought looked really cool) — so much that I decided to abandon cursive altogether. From then on, I have written (i.e printed) exclusively in big and little caps.

And you know what? I sign documents all the time. In the 50 years since I started writing this way, no one (including the effing IRS) has questioned the validity of my signature. Not ever.

I’m all for making sure our kids can read the Constitution, but there are enough printed versions of it available that if they never read it in cursive, it really wouldn’t be a big deal.

I haven’t written in cursive in 50 years.


14 posted on 03/15/2014 11:09:16 AM PDT by Maceman
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To: Olog-hai

Sadly it appears that many FReepers are about as bright as the rest of the general population.

Who cares about old timey writin? Pawn Stars is on.


15 posted on 03/15/2014 11:15:23 AM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: cripplecreek
I noticed that. What such an outlook has to do with conservatism, I am trying to figure out. Writing in cursive comes to me as naturally as breathing or riding a bicycle; it’s not a difficult skill, and rejecting it seems Orwellian to me at least.
16 posted on 03/15/2014 11:20:14 AM PDT by Olog-hai
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To: Olog-hai

A third grade teacher in public school told me that the time formerly used for learning cursive is now taken up by the preparation for state-mandated testing.


17 posted on 03/15/2014 11:21:38 AM PDT by wideminded
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To: Olog-hai

Getting rid of curisve writing is a regressive step back toward the days when only the nobility knew how to read.


18 posted on 03/15/2014 11:24:07 AM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: Maceman

As a genealogist I see lots of crazy script, and the fancy cursive is the hardest to read of all! While I make sure my homeschooled kids can read basic cursive, I trust cheat sheets for their future, much like the ones I use for Early American and English script.

And while Rep. Butt fights for this for nostalgia’s sake, others have argued cursive is faster than printing - an equally bad argument given that efficient printers are faster and easier to read.


19 posted on 03/15/2014 11:24:23 AM PDT by greatvikingone
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To: Olog-hai
The ONLY time I use cursive is when I sign my name, and that's more of a scribble.

Typing replaced it.

20 posted on 03/15/2014 11:25:13 AM PDT by Darren McCarty (Abortion - legalized murder for convenience)
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To: cripplecreek

Agree with your #15, I learned cursive in second grade and wasn’t even aware that there are schools that don’t teach cursive.


21 posted on 03/15/2014 11:27:59 AM PDT by Graybeard58 (God is not the author of confusion. 1 Cor 13: 33)
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To: Maceman

I still sign my name. For everything else, there is printing...although my printing often connects letters, so perhaps what I use is a style of cursive closer to block letters. But I gave up the penmanship taught to me in school 40 years ago.


22 posted on 03/15/2014 11:31:46 AM PDT by Mr Rogers (I sooooo miss America!)
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To: Graybeard58

I’ve seem the same responses to suggestions the constitutional literacy should be a requirement to graduate from high school.

Why waste time on that dusty “400 year old” document?


23 posted on 03/15/2014 11:33:25 AM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: Darren McCarty

But you know how to read it which is what is really important.

I mostly print too but thank God I can read cursive writing.


24 posted on 03/15/2014 11:35:01 AM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: Olog-hai
Even when speaking of the constitution some FReepers don't want students to get bogged down with such wasted learning.

State Rep. Agema wants Michigan to require pledge, teaching of historical U.S. documents
25 posted on 03/15/2014 11:40:09 AM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: cripplecreek

I only write in cursive. Trying to write otherwise my writing looks terrible.


26 posted on 03/15/2014 11:51:08 AM PDT by Mmogamer (I refudiate the lamestream media, leftists and their prevaricutions.)
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To: cripplecreek
I even taught myself to read cursive Cyrillic.

And much of the Japanese language is written and printed in hiragana, a cursive syllabary.

Must be “wasted learning,” though . . .
27 posted on 03/15/2014 12:24:09 PM PDT by Olog-hai
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To: cripplecreek

My wife, a history major, has made that observation as well. There are many historical documents which require the ability to read in cursive in order to grasp their meaning. Letters from Revolutionary or Civil war soldiers to their families, or from elected representatives to constituents provide valuable insight into their lives and the events of the time.

As a teacher, my wife has also mentioned that learning cursive teaches hand-eye coordination and improves fine motor skills. It may not be as useful today with the presence of keyboard, but there are still advantages to learning it.


28 posted on 03/15/2014 12:30:02 PM PDT by Crolis ("To have a right to do a thing is not at all the same as to be right in doing it." -GKC)
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To: Jack Hydrazine

I have a white board with cursive alphabet on it, my Grandson does it until he gets it right when I baby sit.


29 posted on 03/15/2014 12:35:43 PM PDT by Little Bill
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To: Olog-hai

I am a writer and have found that my writing is more creative when employing cursive. For logical reasoning and restructuring a document, using a computer is more efficient for me. However, if I want to put forth my most original, nuanced ideas I have to use cursive.
Here’s an article that points to research that indicates, when compared with typing, writing by hand triggers different parts of the brain:
http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052748704631504575531932754922518?mg=reno64-wsj&url=http%3A%2F%2Fonline.wsj.com%2Farticle%2FSB10001424052748704631504575531932754922518.html


30 posted on 03/15/2014 12:49:57 PM PDT by ransomnote
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To: Olog-hai

Isn’t writing in cursive a lot faster than printing? That’s what I always think anyway.


31 posted on 03/15/2014 1:05:36 PM PDT by jocon307
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To: Olog-hai
Try to read fast, hand-written Japanese, especially written pre-1900--good luck trying to read it! (It sometimes even baffles scholars in Japan.)

Indeed, the old style of Japanese--known as Kobun--is not a popular subject in schools there, and it's not hard to figure out why: it would be like trying to teach Americans the equivalent of Old English. In fact, when the Hirohito (Emperor Showa) read the rescript that accepted the terms of the Potsdam Declaration for the surrender of Japan in that famous speech, the majority of Japanese had serious difficulties understanding it because it was essentially a speech in the same language as a Noh dramatic play, which uses Kobun as the spoken language.

32 posted on 03/15/2014 1:08:11 PM PDT by RayChuang88 (FairTax: America's economic cure)
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To: RayChuang88

By “Old English”, do you mean Anglo-Saxon or something like Chaucer’s Middle English? Those were two very different tongues in and of themselves.

Kobun is an odd one. Any idea why it’s heavier on kana than modern Japanese?


33 posted on 03/15/2014 1:17:43 PM PDT by Olog-hai
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To: Rio

My 4th and 5th graders constantly complained when I wrote in cursive on the board because they couldn’t read it. Cursive is supposed to be taught in 3rd grade! Consequently, I spent a lot of time teaching cursive and they always ended up loving it. It gave them a sense of accomplishment and they were also very proud of themselves when they could write in cursive.


34 posted on 03/15/2014 2:22:13 PM PDT by FrdmLvr ("WE ARE ALL OSAMA, 0BAMA!" al-Qaeda terrorists who breached the American compound in Benghazi)
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To: Maceman

… but you should always be able to read it.

I’ll bet you can. I can even though I write in caps.

The d*mned, dumbed down Teacher’s Unions who probably can’t read or wire cursive are h=behind it.


35 posted on 03/15/2014 2:26:55 PM PDT by BunnySlippers (I LOVE BULL MARKETS . . .)
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To: Olog-hai

When the power goes out, only those that have a command of language will know how to continue.

Maybe this will lead to a possible thinning out of the herd, since they won’t be able to ‘internet search engine name’ anything, and when they are handed a piece of paper to read, go to the wrong location and ......

(you write the rest of that story for yourself!


36 posted on 03/15/2014 3:28:07 PM PDT by Terry L Smith
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To: Olog-hai

We should make sure kids keep learning things that are archaic and has no value to them. Maybe we can also have all kids learn how to shoe a horse or re-thatch a roof.


37 posted on 03/15/2014 3:32:55 PM PDT by Straight Vermonter (Posting from deep behind the Maple Curtain)
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To: MeshugeMikey
I had not considered this but the fostering the inability to read “historical documents in their original form” may have been a goal of the people who managed to quash the use of cursive in government schools.

Yes. The same reason the Progressives deemed Greek and Latin "dead languages". Saved us from reading the history of our civilization in the original [which was the purpose of learning them].

No. Much better we teach the little beggars how to order coffee in French or ask where the library is in Spanish. Utter waste of money and school time.

38 posted on 03/15/2014 4:54:58 PM PDT by BfloGuy ( Even the opponents of Socialism are dominated by socialist ideas.)
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To: Straight Vermonter

Nothing is “archaic” about cursive handwriting. Do you want all children to be like Rachel Jeantel?


39 posted on 03/15/2014 6:10:13 PM PDT by Olog-hai
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To: BfloGuy

theyve tried to decimate the language, and have succeeded to a great degree

They’ve tried to decimate the “the arts”, and have succeeded to a great degree.

come to think of it most of the communist goals from the 1950’s I think it was have been “reached”


40 posted on 03/15/2014 6:57:36 PM PDT by MeshugeMikey (Jesus came to Save not Entertain / Ground John Kerry Now!)
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To: Olog-hai
Do you want all children to be like Rachel Jeantel?

Do you really think that is her greatest problem?

I never write in cursive and I am hard pressed to imagine a situation where my children ever will.

41 posted on 03/15/2014 7:57:17 PM PDT by Straight Vermonter (Posting from deep behind the Maple Curtain)
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To: Straight Vermonter

It’s certainly an indicator of her greatest problem.

I also find it remarkable that non-teaching of cursive is so prevalent. I learned it, and I graduated high school in the late 1980s.


42 posted on 03/15/2014 8:00:42 PM PDT by Olog-hai
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To: Olog-hai
I also find it remarkable that non-teaching of cursive is so prevalent. I learned it, and I graduated high school in the late 1980s.

We're the same age. I learned it too but I just don't see the point in doing so today. When was the last time you wrote or received a letter? I write on the computer all day long but I can't remember when I wrote even a half page with pen and paper.

43 posted on 03/15/2014 8:15:33 PM PDT by Straight Vermonter (Posting from deep behind the Maple Curtain)
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To: Straight Vermonter
I did a lot of handwritten essay-writing even in college. Word processors were not prevalent, and even typewriter labs did not have full-time access those days. When the computer labs came along, WordPerfect 5.1 seemed almost miraculous.
44 posted on 03/15/2014 8:34:14 PM PDT by Olog-hai
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To: Maceman
I did the same in 5th grade. My teacher did not appreciate my unique style of circles to dot my i’s and creative loops at the end of my y’s and G's. Over that summer I taught my self to print in caps. Lower and upper case. Guess I showed her. Still print to this day, 50+ years later although I must say beautiful cursive writing is an art form. I do sign documents with a cursive signature...more of a scrawl...nobody would be able to forge. :-)
45 posted on 03/15/2014 11:58:35 PM PDT by Conservative4Ever (waiting for my Magic 8 ball to give me an answer)
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To: MeshugeMikey
come to think of it most of the communist goals from the 1950’s I think it was have been “reached”

Yes.

I still remember being appalled in 1960 [at least to the extent that a second-grader can feel appalled] that the Soviets encouraged children to rat on their parents. I couldn't imagine such a thing.

But it's common here now. Parents use drugs? Parents own a gun? Parents leave you "unattended"? I understand that there's a great deal of child abuse in our society now, but that the innocent must be swept into the mess is inexcusable and unnecessary.

46 posted on 03/16/2014 4:20:43 PM PDT by BfloGuy ( Even the opponents of Socialism are dominated by socialist ideas.)
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To: BfloGuy

but that the innocent must be swept into the mess is inexcusable and unnecessary.

The innocent and niave,,,are far easier to indoctrinate having little in the way of powers of discrimination.

To most kid not having” to learn cursive means....less work, rather than something lost or more accurately never gained.

It was not until another poster here pointed it out that id thought about the fact that kids lacking the ability to read cursive. can not read the original Founding Documents...of the U.S.A

I’d bet that few of the he “progessive” “educators” in the “rank and file” understand the power of depriving children of the skill of reading and writing in cursive.


47 posted on 03/16/2014 6:16:09 PM PDT by MeshugeMikey (Jesus came to Save not Entertain / Ground John Kerry Now!)
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To: MeshugeMikey
I’d bet that few of the he “progessive” “educators” in the “rank and file” understand the power of depriving children of the skill of reading and writing in cursive.

I believe you are correct in that assessment. They see it as sparing the child [and themselves] the pain of learning something which they see as unnecessary and outmoded.

But, of course, there are more reasons to learn cursive writing than being able to read old documents. It's faster to write and the discipline alone -- it's somewhat of an art -- is valuable.

48 posted on 03/18/2014 4:24:17 PM PDT by BfloGuy ( Even the opponents of Socialism are dominated by socialist ideas.)
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To: everyone

Be honest, everyone. Have you actually put pen or pencil to paper today? I would wager that for the majority of us we rarely actually pick up a pen/cil and write, whether in print or in cursive. I “write” all day, but I rarely will use anything but a keyboard.


49 posted on 03/18/2014 4:33:37 PM PDT by Benito Cereno
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To: BfloGuy

I Seldom take the opportunity to write in cursive these days. My signature however still bears the mark of a person who took some pride in learning to write in the cursive manner.

What will the signatures of todays children who don’t learn to write cursive Look Like?

Are we headed back to the day when scrawling the letter X as ones signature was sufficient?....


50 posted on 03/18/2014 6:01:14 PM PDT by MeshugeMikey (Jesus came to Save not Entertain / Ground John Kerry Now!)
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