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Soviet Super-Sub Was a Dead Fish in Combat (Alfa Class)
War is Boring ^ | March 17, 2014 | David Axe

Posted on 03/17/2014 8:06:22 AM PDT by C19fan

In 1969, the Soviet navy shocked the U.S. and NATO militaries with a new and incredibly capable submarine—one that could swim faster and dive deeper than anything else under the sea.

But the seven high-tech Alfa-class submarines—able to reach 45 knots and 2,400 feet—were actually inferior where it really mattered. Their speed and depth-resistance came at the cost of noisy internal machinery that made them easy to detect … and destroy.

(Excerpt) Read more at medium.com ...


TOPICS: History; Military/Veterans
KEYWORDS: alfa; russia; submarines; ukraine; viktoryanukovich; yuliatymoshenko
That was the Russkie sub that chased after Red October.
1 posted on 03/17/2014 8:06:22 AM PDT by C19fan
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To: C19fan
The Soviets retired six Alfas by 1990 and the seventh in 1996. The successor Victor III and Akula boats were, like their NATO rivals, balanced—and thus far more fearsome in combat. Even if they were slower and lower-diving than the Alfas.

Never forget that Toshiba Corporation cooperated with the Soviets to get around US export licences so the Soviets could buy the high-tech tooling they needed to produce quieter screws for the Akula class boats.

They knew what they were doing and that it was illegal, but the money was too good, so they did it anyway.

Toshiba is on my Lifetime Boycott List, and they should be on yours, too.

2 posted on 03/17/2014 8:17:19 AM PDT by Haiku Guy (Health Care Haiku: If You Have a Right / To the Labor I Provide / I Must Be Your Slave)
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To: Haiku Guy
Never forget that Toshiba Corporation cooperated with the Soviets to get around US export licences so the Soviets could buy the high-tech tooling they needed to produce quieter screws for the Akula class boats.

I was fighting the Cold War when Toshiba did this and since then I have never even glanced at any of their products when I decide to make a purchase.

3 posted on 03/17/2014 8:20:37 AM PDT by OldMissileer
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To: C19fan

So the book and the movie are loosely based on historical events?


4 posted on 03/17/2014 8:22:31 AM PDT by Jack Hydrazine (Pubbies = national collectivists; Dems = international collectivists; We need a second party!)
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To: Haiku Guy
Toshiba is on my Lifetime Boycott List, and they should be on yours, too.

It is, and for this very reason.

5 posted on 03/17/2014 8:22:32 AM PDT by Riley (The Fourth Estate is the Fifth Column.)
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To: OldMissileer

Me too. I remember this, and have never even looked at Toshiba laptops.


6 posted on 03/17/2014 8:23:43 AM PDT by Salvavida (The restoration of the U.S.A. starts with filling the pews at every Bible-believing church.)
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To: Jack Hydrazine
So the book and the movie are loosely based on historical events?

No. The story is made up. The classes of submarines and a lot of the ships actually named were not.

7 posted on 03/17/2014 8:25:12 AM PDT by DoodleDawg
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To: C19fan

Typical Russian brute force technology.

Russia is not the one I’m worried about. China is.


8 posted on 03/17/2014 8:25:33 AM PDT by McGruff (They say the first casualty of war is truth)
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To: C19fan

“The Soviets retired six Alfas by 1990 and the seventh in 1996. The successor Victor III and Akula boats were, like their NATO rivals, balanced—and thus far more fearsome in combat”

I’ve read a couple articles that claimed late model Akula’s were on par with early model 688’s. I don’t know how true that is, but it does seem that the design was one of the best the Soviet navy had.

I often wonder about the noise issues the Soviets might have had with their “boomers.” From what I understand about ballistic missile subs (which I admit is frightfully little), they spend most of their time figuring out the best way to remain unseen, unheard, and avoiding contact.


9 posted on 03/17/2014 8:33:24 AM PDT by DemforBush (A Repo Man is *always* intense.)
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To: Jack Hydrazine

There was an episode of a Soviet surface ship unsuccessfully trying to defect:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soviet_frigate_Storozhevoy


10 posted on 03/17/2014 8:34:56 AM PDT by C19fan
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To: DemforBush

Now we just track them by the trail of radiation leakage they leave behind. :-)


11 posted on 03/17/2014 9:07:50 AM PDT by Georgia Girl 2 (The only purpose o f a pistol is to fight your way back to the rifle you should never have dropped.)
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To: C19fan

"You've lost another submarine?"

12 posted on 03/17/2014 9:10:01 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: McGruff
Russia is not the one I’m worried about. China is.

Why do you think China is any better than the Soviets were?

13 posted on 03/17/2014 9:15:56 AM PDT by Lower Deck
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To: Haiku Guy
Never forget that Toshiba Corporation cooperated with the Soviets to get around US export licences so the Soviets could buy the high-tech tooling they needed to produce quieter screws for the Akula class boats.

Yep. The computers and milling machines were shipped in 1983 and 1984; improvements to Soviet subs were noted by 1987. Submarined by Japan and Norway.

14 posted on 03/17/2014 9:16:15 AM PDT by Charles Martel (Endeavor to persevere...)
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To: DemforBush
From what I understand about ballistic missile subs (which I admit is frightfully little), they spend most of their time figuring out the best way to remain unseen, unheard, and avoiding contact.

Most missile subs do just that. In the early days, the range of their missiles was much less; the missile boats had to come further out into the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.

Now, the range of the missiles is improved, so rather than venture out into open ocean, the subs just hide under the Arctic ice, where sonar conditions are lousy for everyone.

15 posted on 03/17/2014 9:19:38 AM PDT by Lou L (Health "insurance" is NOT the same as health "care")
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To: OldMissileer
I was fighting the Cold War when Toshiba did this and since then I have never even glanced at any of their products when I decide to make a purchase.

I remember it well and I, like you, have never purchased a Toshiba product since.

16 posted on 03/17/2014 9:33:19 AM PDT by JohnG45
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To: dfwgator

Subs “swim”?


17 posted on 03/17/2014 10:12:56 AM PDT by ken5050 (I fear a world run by adults who were never spanked as kids and got trophies just for participating)
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To: Lower Deck

“Why do you think China is any better than the Soviets were?”

Even our military uses Chinese made critical parts, that’s why.


18 posted on 03/17/2014 10:30:16 AM PDT by CodeToad (Keeping whites from talking about blacks is verbal segregation!)
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To: C19fan

“the golden fish”


19 posted on 03/18/2014 3:11:13 PM PDT by bravo whiskey (We should not fear our government. Our government should fear us.)
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