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The Story of the Calzone
Eater ^ | Thursday, March 20, 2014 | Robert Sietsema

Posted on 03/21/2014 3:41:16 PM PDT by nickcarraway

Most of us walk into a neighborhood pizzeria with the intention of buying a slice from one of the pies working on the counter. But there's usually a separate case — really just a glass box with shelves — that contains other entities considered to be the province of the pizza parlor. In it you may find garlic knots (wads of dough bathed in olive oil, crushed garlic, and parsley), stromboli (thin sheets of dough rolled up into flattened sleeves filled with sausage, cheese, onions, peppers, and other pizza toppings), "hippie" rolls (thicker dough cylinders stuffed with pizza toppings), meat patties (the only thing not made with pizza dough, really Jamaican empanadas colored with yellow annatto and fabricated elsewhere), and, oldest of all, the calzone, a half-moon purse of pizza dough, filled with the brilliant combination of ricotta and mozzarella, plus other ingredients.

Did the calzone, like the pizza, originate in Naples? And why the hell would you want to order a calzone rather than a slice?

According to Waverly Root, in his exhaustive Foods of Italy (1971), calzoni, like pizza, originated in Naples. Translated "pants legs," it represented a sort of "walk-around" form of pizza that could be carried out and eaten without utensils, while the damp-in-the-middle pies made in the same pizzerias had to be eaten on the premises with a knife and fork. Calzoni were most often made with standard pizza fillings like mozzarella, tomatoes, and anchovies, but also could contain more complex fillings: "One recipe calls for chopped chicory hearts, unsalted anchovy fillets chopped fine, capers, pitted sliced black olives, currants, garlic, and an egg yolk."

Calzoni (sometimes styled "calzone" in the clipped southern Italian dialect) typically had a half-moon shape, indicating they were probably made with a single round pizza crust folded over. And remember pizzas in Naples are one-person pies, so our current American calzone is usually the same size as the calzoni back in its city of origin.

But what if you simply made a calzone with a much bigger American pizza crust folded over? That seems to be the case at John's of Bleecker Street, one of the city's (and the nation's) oldest pizza parlors, started by one of the bakers at Lombardi's, John Sasso, in 1929. The calzone there is in the usual half-moon configuration, only it's humongous, filled with vast amounts of ricotta, mozzarella, and pizza toppings of your choice from the pizzeria's limited roster (the best of which are pepperoni and Italian sausage, or both). This mega-calzone easily feeds three, and comes with a mild tomato sauce on the side for dipping, an improvement on the usual practice predicated on the realization that nobody can pick this baby up and carry it around.

Another reason for the giant calzone: it was a way to stick it to the old country, by showing how lush and generous our adaptations of Italian dishes could be.


TOPICS: Food
KEYWORDS: calzone

1 posted on 03/21/2014 3:41:16 PM PDT by nickcarraway
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To: nickcarraway
The pizza fell on the floor...Within 5 seconds, they pushed it all back on the shell, folded it over and picked it up.

And the calzone was born!!

2 posted on 03/21/2014 3:43:33 PM PDT by Sacajaweau
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To: nickcarraway

Love a good calzone! A pizza place not far from me does a great one...it is a small pizza folded over, and I have them fill it with pepperoni, sausage, hamburg, black olives, mozzarella, ricotta, peppers and mushrooms.

It is a couple days worth of food. And if you like cold pizza the next day, try cold calzone...


3 posted on 03/21/2014 3:51:14 PM PDT by LostInBayport (When there are more people riding in the cart than there are pulling it, the cart stops moving...)
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To: Sacajaweau

My grandma dropped a blueberry pie on the floor, scooped it up and invented blueberry buckle.


4 posted on 03/21/2014 3:54:29 PM PDT by DManA
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To: nickcarraway

So, Calzone is Italian for pizza dropped on the floor?


5 posted on 03/21/2014 3:57:38 PM PDT by caver (Obama: Home of the Whopper)
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To: nickcarraway

That looks good.

I have actually never had a calzone.


6 posted on 03/21/2014 4:07:29 PM PDT by yarddog (Romans 8: verses 38 and 39. "For I am persuaded".)
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To: LostInBayport

I discovered cal zones in the mid 90s. Growing up I got razzed a lot for always folding pizzas over, especially the little frozen ones.


7 posted on 03/21/2014 4:09:46 PM PDT by wally_bert (There are no winners in a game of losers. I'm Tommy Joyce, welcome to the Oriental Lounge.)
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To: LostInBayport
I wish I could find a good Calzone.

It's usually burnt on the outside or still mushy and uncooked on the inside.

8 posted on 03/21/2014 4:27:55 PM PDT by who_would_fardels_bear
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To: nickcarraway

9 posted on 03/21/2014 4:36:30 PM PDT by JoeProBono (SOME IMAGES MAY BE DISTURBING VIEWER DISCRETION IS ADVISED;-{)
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To: nickcarraway

That’s a meal-and-a-half!


10 posted on 03/21/2014 4:47:42 PM PDT by carriage_hill (Peace is that brief glorious moment in history, when everybody stands around reloading.)
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To: who_would_fardels_bear; nickcarraway
I wish I could find a good Calzone.

NOT agood substitute!


11 posted on 03/21/2014 4:53:06 PM PDT by WVKayaker ("Help spread the good news; we can send helpmates to the good guys in D.C." -Sarah Palin, March 13)
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To: nickcarraway

One of the areas best Italian restaurants (truly Italian), closed after many years, had a unique calzone that I preferred over any pizza.

The crust was in a roll with the ends closed, not the half moon shape that is normally called a calzone. And it was a delicious, crispy, crunchy crust.

Inside it had all the traditional stuff but included pepperoni - and you could add anything you wanted just like on a pizza.

I have yet to find one like it at any Italian restaurant anywhere....so sad......


12 posted on 03/21/2014 4:56:54 PM PDT by Arlis
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To: nickcarraway

Too much dough. I prefer pizza.


13 posted on 03/21/2014 4:58:28 PM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: nickcarraway

I grew up in Brooklyn and never had calzone with anything but cheese in it. In fact I never saw a calzone with anything BUT cheese until I moved to Delaware. Couldn’t get it there with only cheese so I learned how to make them myself!


14 posted on 03/21/2014 4:59:32 PM PDT by Gabz (Democrats for Voldemort.)
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