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Fighting the Great War
nationalreview.com ^ | 3/22/2014 | Michael Auslin

Posted on 03/23/2014 6:40:36 AM PDT by rktman

.......there is in the United States only one memorial and museum dedicated to the Great War. Located in Kansas City, Mo., the Liberty Memorial and National World War I Museum opened in December 2006 and is a state-of-the-art tour de force.

(Excerpt) Read more at nationalreview.com ...


TOPICS: History; Military/Veterans; Society
KEYWORDS: kansas; veterans
Would certainly like to visit someday.
1 posted on 03/23/2014 6:40:36 AM PDT by rktman
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To: rktman

Yes! Nice that there is finally something for the big forgotten war.


2 posted on 03/23/2014 6:44:08 AM PDT by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue./Technological progress cannot be legislated.)
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To: rktman

There us WWI memorial on the DC mall


3 posted on 03/23/2014 6:45:50 AM PDT by 2banana (My common ground with terrorists - they want to die for islam and we want to kill them)
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To: rktman

Well worth the visit.


4 posted on 03/23/2014 6:47:14 AM PDT by Maine Mariner
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To: 2banana

Memorial yes. Museum, no. Been to the memorial, not the museum. Made my last trip to the mall several years ago. Had a real creepy-crawly kinda feeling up my neck the whole time we were there. Probably because I knew what was going on behind closed doors. Never go back to D.C. again.


5 posted on 03/23/2014 6:49:37 AM PDT by rktman (Ethnicity: Redneck. Race: Daytona 500)
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To: 2banana

Which is sadly neglected.

And not a whole museum.


6 posted on 03/23/2014 7:02:44 AM PDT by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue./Technological progress cannot be legislated.)
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To: rktman; AdmSmith; AnonymousConservative; Berosus; bigheadfred; Bockscar; cardinal4; ColdOne; ...

Thanks rktman.

Remembrance Rd in Grand Rapids and Walker MI was so named to commemorate World War One; WWI monuments were constructed to either supplement or supersede Civil War monuments in a lot of small towns, including the one where I grew up. Other WWI monuments for US servicepeople were constructed in Europe (including some by European gov’ts).

Nearly 2 million served in France; more than 53,000 died in combat or of wounds sustained in combat (circa 2.5 percent), and about 1 in 10 were wounded in battle.


7 posted on 03/23/2014 7:27:38 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: rktman

This is an excellent museum and well worth a visit to Kansas City. It’s redo turned it into a modern museum and among modern historians and modern museum curators, experience and interpretation are much more important than understanding. If you want an understanding, you’ll need to do some research and you will have to set aside a few subtle modern political tomes. While it is not as grand as the Imperial War Museum, or as stunning as a visit to Verdun and Douaumont; this place ranks with them as the one of the very best windows into the Great War.


8 posted on 03/23/2014 7:41:24 AM PDT by centurion316
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To: rktman

We should have stayed at home. Then no memorial needed.

Uh-Oh....I sense an irrelevant an alternate history rant overtaking me!

Had Prez Wilson (a racist New Jersey psychotic castrato) kept his word and us OUT OF THE WAR.....

1. The Western and Central Powers would have probably fought to a mutually exhausting and honorable stalemate....Brits, Frogs, and Krauts would have cooperated to contain, then roll-back the Marxist nightmare in Russia saving 10 millions upon 10 millions AND no Hitler....savings 10 millions upon 10 millions more. There might still be nice, not Nazi, Germans in the Ukraine from the Brest-Livtosk Treaty!

2. Ottoman Empire would have gradually unwound, if at all, along proper tribal lines instead of the nonsensical imperial lines carved up by Brits and Frogs for their pet Arab lackeys. NO MID-EAST NIGHTMARE TODAY. Unlikely the Muslim faith would become as “mission focused” and radicalized as today. Zionist Jews would have continued their gradual movement into Modern Israel over decades as they had been. They would be supported by the still living/unliquidated Jewish merchant and middle classes of Europe and not the US Government.

3. “Same same” with the Austro-Hungarian Empire. A gradual devolution to immateriality. No Balkan Wars in the 90’s.

4. US and European powers would be united in opposition to a rising Imperial Japan which would have been quickly neutered. A contained Sino-Japanese war AND no Stalin (see #1) would mean NO Mao-Tse-Sung and no Pearl Harbor/Pacific war

5. Progressivism and FedGov growth would have lacked the fertile launch pad of Wilsonian war jingoism and structures.

6. It goes on....You fill in the blank for even more benefits had the Doughboys stayed “Over here”, instead of bleeding for British and French imperial interests “Over there”.

WWI is a powerful, yet seldom mentioned example example of how the US meddling in others’ affairs turns out REALLY badly for everybody including US.

OK. My Pat Buchanan moment is past.

And.....what the heck do I know.


9 posted on 03/23/2014 7:49:38 AM PDT by Lowell1775
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To: rktman

It was “The Great War,” for only a blip of history. Proving of course that people never learn... ever. The latest iteration? BHO.


10 posted on 03/23/2014 7:50:48 AM PDT by HMS Surprise (Chris Christie can STILL go straight to hell.)
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To: centurion316

Been to the IWM in London in the early ‘60ish time frame. I was about 15 at the time and it was awesome. Of course at that age I didn’t understand a whole lot. Time passes and I find that I still don’t understand a lot. :>)


11 posted on 03/23/2014 8:00:54 AM PDT by rktman (Ethnicity: Redneck. Race: Daytona 500)
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To: rktman
Would certainly like to visit someday.

Well worth it. They redid the memorial and the museum a few years back and it's fantastic. Examples of virtually every uniform and every weapon used by those involved are on display. There are artillery pieces, machine guns, and even a tank on display. The gift store probably has the best selection of World War I history books available in one place. Aside from the slightly leftist opening video it's a great place to spend an afternoon.

12 posted on 03/23/2014 8:08:10 AM PDT by DoodleDawg
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To: 2banana
There us WWI memorial on the DC mall

That's World War II. The World War I Memorial and Museum in KC is the only First World War only memorial in the country.

13 posted on 03/23/2014 8:09:22 AM PDT by DoodleDawg
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To: DoodleDawg

I believe that he may be referring to the First Division Monument which is located in President’s Park west of the White House.


14 posted on 03/23/2014 8:17:50 AM PDT by centurion316
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To: SunkenCiv
Nearly 2 million served in France; more than 53,000 died in combat or of wounds sustained in combat (circa 2.5 percent), and about 1 in 10 were wounded in battle.

And at that the U.S. had a very low casualty rate. Britain has a list of what are called "Thankful Villages. These are villages in the United Kingdom that sent men off to war and didn't lose a single son during the First World War, and it truly brings home just how horrible the UK cost was. There were, at the time, roughly 16,000 villages, towns, and cities in the UK. There are 32 Thankful Villages in the UK. There is one in France.

15 posted on 03/23/2014 8:17:53 AM PDT by DoodleDawg
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To: Lowell1775

The most amazing thing about your opinion is that you are not alone. A lonely few others also believe that the United States could have avoided an entry onto the world stage and remained a prosperous little fantasy island.


16 posted on 03/23/2014 8:20:39 AM PDT by centurion316
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To: centurion316
I believe that he may be referring to the First Division Monument which is located in President’s Park west of the White House.

I think there's a place near Chicago where McCormick had his estate that's also a First Division memorial. But both of those are specific to a single unit while the KC memorial is dedicated to all the Allies.

17 posted on 03/23/2014 8:21:02 AM PDT by DoodleDawg
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To: DoodleDawg

Cantigny, named for the 1st Division’s first big battle is the estate of Colonel Robert McCormick, a veteran of the 1st Division and publisher of the Chicago Tribune. The estate grounds include an excellent museum of the 1st Division covering their entire history.

Lot’s of museums include WWI collections, but in the United States, only the Kansas City one is dedicated solely to the First World War.


18 posted on 03/23/2014 8:25:19 AM PDT by centurion316
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To: DoodleDawg

As in the title, this memorial stands for WWI soldiers that fought and gave their lives. The memorial stands in West Potomac Park slightly off of Independence Avenue in a grove of trees. Authorized by an act of Congress on June 7, 1924, funds to construct the memorial were provided by the contributions of both organizations and individual citizens of the District. Construction of the memorial began in the spring of 1931, and the memorial was dedicated by President Herbert Hoover on November 11, 1931 (Armistice Day). It was the first war memorial to be erected in West Potomac Park, part of the National Mall near the Lincoln Memorial, and remains the only local District memorial on the National Mall.

Designed by Washington architect Frederick H. Brooke, with Horace W. Peaslee and Nathan C. Wyeth as associate architects, the District of Columbia War Memorial is in the form of a 47 foot (14.3 m) tall circular, domed, peristyle Doric temple. Resting on concrete foundations, the 4 foot (1.2 m) high marble base defines a platform, 43 feet 5 inches (13.2 m) in diameter, intended for use as a bandstand. Preserved in the cornerstone of the District of Columbia World War Memorial is a list of 26,000 Washingtonians who served in the Great War. Inscribed on the base are the names of the 499 District of Columbia citizens who lost their lives in the war, together with medallions representing the branches of the armed forces. Twelve 22 foot (6.7 m) tall fluted Doric marble columns support the entablature and dome.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/District_of_Columbia_War_Memorial


19 posted on 03/23/2014 8:27:24 AM PDT by 2banana (My common ground with terrorists - they want to die for islam and we want to kill them)
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To: rktman

http://theworldwar.org/

WELL worth the visit.


20 posted on 03/23/2014 8:38:50 AM PDT by US Navy Vet (Go Packers! Go Rockies! Go Boston Bruins! See, I'm "Diverse"!)
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To: DoodleDawg

Awful attrition, and more to the point, execrable military leadership.


21 posted on 03/23/2014 9:12:18 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: US Navy Vet

Wish we had known when we moved west from FL since we drove right through KC. Ooops. LOL!


22 posted on 03/23/2014 9:34:39 AM PDT by rktman (Ethnicity: Redneck. Race: Daytona 500)
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To: DoodleDawg

No, the DC WWI is not far from the Reflecting Pool and is much older. Verifying other reply.


23 posted on 03/23/2014 10:06:49 AM PDT by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue./Technological progress cannot be legislated.)
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To: centurion316

No, see other posts.

Shows how pathetically maintained and marketed it is that no one knows and even doubts its presence.


24 posted on 03/23/2014 10:08:28 AM PDT by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue./Technological progress cannot be legislated.)
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To: Lowell1775

You won’t get argument from me.

But then, I think it is sad that since WWII at least, the war has been forgotten. It really is a great history lesson to learn about this “underrated” war. And the horror it wrought from the “reason” it happened in the first place, to the tactics of it, and the consequences.

Stupid, horrible war, and men deserve great praise for going into this war we should not have engaged.


25 posted on 03/23/2014 10:15:09 AM PDT by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue./Technological progress cannot be legislated.)
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To: the OlLine Rebel

It is a shame that it is not more well known, or visited. But it is not a national memorial, but it does stand as a statement that most of the local memorials, even the one on the National Mall are largely forgotten and ignored.


26 posted on 03/23/2014 11:15:49 AM PDT by centurion316
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