Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Waiter, There's a Black Hole in My Condensed Matter...
Perimeter Institute ^ | Monday, March 24, 2014 | unattributed

Posted on 03/25/2014 7:21:28 AM PDT by SunkenCiv

Physicists are using surprising ideas and mathematical tools originating in string theory to guide research into strange materials that are cropping up in condensed matter laboratories...

“Let’s start here,” Sachdev says. “Condensed matter physicists study the behaviour of electrons in many materials – semiconductors, metals, and exotic materials like superconductors.”

Normally, these physicists can model the behaviour of a material as if electrons were moving freely around inside it. Even if that’s not what’s actually happening, because of complex interactions, it makes the model easy to understand and the calculations easier to do. Electrons (and occasionally other particles) used in this kind of short-hand model are called quasi-particles...

“Without quasi-particles, it’s a mess,” says William Witczak-Krempa. Witczak-Krempa, a Perimeter postdoctoral fellow, is also a condensed matter theorist who collaborated with Sachdev on the paper. “It’s this quantum fuzzball of stuff.,, Erik’s work was a huge computational achievement. It took months of processing time. And, in the end, the results still needed to be converted into a form that can be compared with experiments. This is where we tried something new.”

To perform this conversion, Sachdev and Witczak-Krempa tackled the same system from a different angle: string theory.

(Excerpt) Read more at newswise.com ...


TOPICS: Astronomy; Science
KEYWORDS: eriksorensen; stringtheory; subirsachde; williamwitczakkrempa
Regarding Subir Sachde, William Witczak-Krempa, and Erik Sørensen.

No images, I'm just putting this text here because sometimes the system forgets to add a "reply" link.

1 posted on 03/25/2014 7:21:28 AM PDT by SunkenCiv
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: 6SJ7; AdmSmith; AFPhys; Arkinsaw; allmost; aristotleman; autumnraine; backwoods-engineer; ...


· List topics · post a topic · subscribe · Google ·

2 posted on 03/25/2014 7:22:24 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

At last, a scientist who knows how to name something strange: “It’s this quantum fuzzball of stuff ...”


3 posted on 03/25/2014 7:26:35 AM PDT by MHGinTN (Being deceived can be cured.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
string theory photo: string theory cat funny-pictures-physicist-cat-tri-1.jpg
4 posted on 03/25/2014 7:33:25 AM PDT by Snickering Hound
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

Bump


5 posted on 03/25/2014 7:35:58 AM PDT by abigail2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv; MHGinTN
And, in the end, the results still needed to be converted into a form that can be compared with experiments.

Model, hell let's take it to the lab and find out for real - Not when you're seeding black holes I say! :-)

6 posted on 03/25/2014 7:36:52 AM PDT by Errant (Surround yourself with intelligent and industrious people who help and support each other.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
In theory there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is.

  - Yogi Berra

7 posted on 03/25/2014 7:43:57 AM PDT by BitWielder1 (Corporate Profits are better than Government Waste)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
From the article and certainly newsworthy:

"What’s more, string theory has finally produced a set of physical predictions that experimentalists can go check. "

About time. I'm hoping it's true and it works out.

8 posted on 03/25/2014 7:57:32 AM PDT by InterceptPoint
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Errant
A significant number of the scientists working on the bomb in New Mexico in 1945 were concerned that a runaway chain reaction could incinerate the entire earth ... but the bomb was detonated anyway.

At Cern there were voices which cautioned that no one knew what would happen if they created a nano-sized black hole in a collision. But they fired that thing up anyway and even repaired it and did it again after it over heated!

Which reminds me, with the first hydrogen bomb tests the 'brilliant' scientists got a 40% higher yield than expected, because they didn't think Lithium would add any to the reactions, IIRC.

9 posted on 03/25/2014 7:57:38 AM PDT by MHGinTN (Being deceived can be cured.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Snickering Hound

Thanks, I used to use that one in the rotation, until the URL I used vanished.


10 posted on 03/25/2014 8:17:54 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: MHGinTN

That was Ed Teller’s bomb design, I believe — the ginormous contraption we have to thank for the B-52 and the Saturn V (indirectly — the F1 engine was going to be needed to deliver the Teller H-bomb).


11 posted on 03/25/2014 8:20:29 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: BitWielder1

:’)


12 posted on 03/25/2014 8:22:25 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: MHGinTN
One has to wonder if one day we trigger something picked up thousands of light-years away, in another galaxy, by some alien satellite as a massive gamma emission and then subsequent explosion.

At least maybe it will be quick. ;)

13 posted on 03/25/2014 8:22:28 AM PDT by Errant (Surround yourself with intelligent and industrious people who help and support each other.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: InterceptPoint

The bar for what constitutes experiment has been lowered though. :’)


14 posted on 03/25/2014 8:23:04 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

“Strange materials that are cropping up in condensed matter laboratories”

I wondered where I left my jello.


15 posted on 03/25/2014 8:29:44 AM PDT by blueunicorn6 ("A crack shot and a good dancer")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
"The bar for what constitutes experiment has been lowered though. :’)"

True enough. But don't overlook this key fact: Desperate times call for desperate measures.

It seems clear to me that String Theory is long overdue for something, anything that can help verify all this math. Just because your theory is pretty just isn't good enough for me. I'd like to see something that either proves or disproves the whole concept.

Worth reading:


16 posted on 03/25/2014 8:39:35 AM PDT by InterceptPoint
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Errant

The watchers don’t have to be so far away. It is a very good bet that humankind has been under scrutiny for generations, and particularly since our detonations in the forties, fifties and sixties. The detections may have been no further away than the Moon ... or in polar orbit (Black KNight anyone?).


17 posted on 03/25/2014 9:39:44 AM PDT by MHGinTN (Being deceived can be cured.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: InterceptPoint

That book was actually the inspiration for this ping list. :’)


18 posted on 03/25/2014 11:33:43 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: InterceptPoint

They’re utilizing mathematics derived from M-Theory exploration. That’s a start, and if I recall correctly, I think there are at least two other such studies.

Something said by the late great physicist Paul Dirac has always sortta haunted me: “It is more important to have beauty in one’s equations than to have them fit experiment.”

Beauty in the sense of symmetry.

I believe that neither beauty nor truth can exist, one without the other.

Funny, isn’t it?, that these are also characteristics usually associated with God.


19 posted on 03/25/2014 12:08:09 PM PDT by onedoug
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: onedoug

Something said by the late great physicist Paul Dirac has always sortta haunted me: “It is more important to have beauty in one’s equations than to have them fit experiment.”
+++++++++++
That is a really interesting comment. Being a kind person, I assume that Dirac didn’t believe that a pretty theory with pretty equations falsified by experiment had any value.

But in rejecting complex descriptions of the workings of nature I agree with his comment. Einstein didn’t sum an infinite trigonometric series to express the relationship between the speed of light, mass and energy. Somehow nature has conjured a way to express its behavior using various very simple combinations of mathematical symbols. Dirac wanted to find those symbols and the associated arrangement of those symbols that explain natural phenomena. An admiral goal.


20 posted on 03/25/2014 5:46:53 PM PDT by InterceptPoint
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: InterceptPoint

Nature? No. God? Yes. I believe all the evidence supports a Creator, of which nature is but a part.

Interestingly, aspects of M-Theory hearken back to Hugh Everett’s “Many Worlds” interpretation of quantum mechanics of the mid-1950s in which “all” outcomes of events are realized, and are not simply chosen when the quantum wave function collapses and a specific outcome is realized.

If true, scaling energy downward to General Relativity - which would still be unified at a time lim=0 - should in consequence yield sets of circumstances in the macro as well. This could mean that when we die, however we die, our lives could continue in some other plane on which they have been playing out almost literally, eternally, with no break at all in the continuity of our lives, completely unaware of what had just transpired in that other plane of “this” existence.

...Except as a conjurer of ideas, such as I hope I can count myself. I don’t think God would mind. Hey, it’s just a hypothesis.

Though it does sort of gives a fresh perspective on the religious sense, here at least, of “eternal life”.

Best....


21 posted on 03/25/2014 9:34:15 PM PDT by onedoug
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson