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Cremation gaining acceptance, study shows
Baptist Press ^ | Mar 26, 2014 | Bob Smietana

Posted on 03/27/2014 11:44:44 AM PDT by Graybeard58

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (BP) -- Cremation may be the new American response to death, according to a survey by LifeWay Research.

The study, which surveyed 1,036 Americans, shows that about 4 in 10 (41 percent) say they plan to be cremated.

Six in ten (58 percent) say being cremated won't keep you from being resurrected to live in heaven. And few (14 percent) say cremation is wrong.

The LifeWay online survey reflects the growing acceptance of cremation, which has become common in the United States.

About 4 in 9 (43.5 percent) Americans who died in 2012 were cremated, according to the Cremation Association of North America (CANA). That's nearly double the rate from 1996 (21.8 percent).

LifeWay researchers found that few Americans have qualms about the practice.

More than 7 in 10 (71 percent) disagree with the statement, "I believe it is wrong to cremate a body after someone dies."

Only 3 in 10 (30 percent) disagree with the statement, "I plan to have my body cremated when I die." Forty-one percent agree, while 29 percent do not know.

Scott McConnell, vice-president of LifeWay Research, said cremation fits the way most Americans live these days.

"Few people stay in the same place all their lives, so they don't have strong connection to a place they want to be buried," he said. "Cremation is also often less expensive than burial. And many of the social taboos about cremation are fading."

The survey found that few Americans think cremation has any consequences for the afterlife. Fifty-eight percent disagree with the statement, "If someone's body is cremated, there is no way for them to be resurrected to live in heaven." Only 8 percent agree. One in 5 (20 percent) don't know. Fourteen percent say there is no resurrection to live in heaven.

Evangelical Christians have been wary of cremation in the past. And the practice does remain less common in the Bible belt. In Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi and Tennessee, the cremation rate is among the lowest in the country, at 23.9 percent, according to CANA. By contrast, in Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon and Washington, the cremation rate is 60.3 percent.

In LifeWay's survey, self-identified born-again, evangelical or fundamentalist Christians are most likely (27 percent) to say that cremation is wrong and to disagree (42 percent) when asked about being cremated. They're also (70 percent) most likely to disagree when asked if cremation would keep someone from being resurrected to live in heaven.

Methodology: The online survey of adult Americans was conducted September 6, 2013. A sample of an online panel representing the adult population of the U.S. was invited to participate. Responses were weighted by region, age, ethnicity, gender and income to more accurately reflect the population. The completed sample is 1,036 online surveys. The sample provides 95 percent confidence that the sampling error from this panel does not exceed plus or minus 3.1 percent. Margins of error are higher in sub-groups.


TOPICS: Chit/Chat
KEYWORDS: cremation
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I want my funeral to be as cheap as possible, that means cremation. Where I'm going, I'm going to have a new body anyway. One without pain of any sort.
1 posted on 03/27/2014 11:44:44 AM PDT by Graybeard58
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To: Graybeard58

same here.


2 posted on 03/27/2014 11:47:05 AM PDT by corlorde (forWARD of the state)
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To: Graybeard58

“If someone’s body is cremated, there is no way for them to be resurrected to live in heaven.”

Does this mean believers who die in fires, plane crashes etc... are not allowed in heaven? No.


3 posted on 03/27/2014 11:51:09 AM PDT by Resolute Conservative
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To: Graybeard58

my thoughts exactly


4 posted on 03/27/2014 11:51:15 AM PDT by BipolarBob
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To: Graybeard58
Yup. After I'm gone, I don't want my family to feel obligated to maintain my final resting place, or feel tied to that geographical location. I want them to cremate me, scatter my ashes in the mountains, and keep me in their memories. That's all I can ask.

Scouts Out! Cavalry Ho!

5 posted on 03/27/2014 11:51:56 AM PDT by wku man (We are the 53%! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YUXN0GDuLN4)
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To: Graybeard58
"If someone's body is cremated, there is no way for them to be resurrected to live in heaven." Only 8 percent agree.

Sure would be interested to hear from the 8 percent. What do they base this opinion on?

It sure doesn't say much for your belief in an all-powerful God if you believe he's incapable of reconstituting a body destroyed by fire.

6 posted on 03/27/2014 11:52:31 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: Graybeard58

It’s the new American response to “cheap” ... :-) ...


7 posted on 03/27/2014 11:52:46 AM PDT by Star Traveler (Remember to keep the Messiah of Israel in the One-World Government that we look forward to coming)
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To: Graybeard58

I’m in for the roast and toast also, but don’t agree with the scattering of ashes unless there is no surviving family. I believe humans need a place to visit, to remember, grieve and share. My Grandmother, without telling anyone had My Grandfather cremated and his ashes dumped at sea by a high turn over operation. The rest of family have never gotten over the lack of place to visit.


8 posted on 03/27/2014 11:53:00 AM PDT by Mastador1 (I'll take a bad dog over a good politician any day!)
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To: Graybeard58

cook and send the ashes to the landfill!

Wasting real estate on dead bodies should be illegal!


9 posted on 03/27/2014 11:59:18 AM PDT by dalereed
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To: Mastador1

Anyone can have a marker made if they want one. You can even purchase a cemetery plot to place a marker on if you want - or you can place it wherever you wish.


10 posted on 03/27/2014 12:00:00 PM PDT by HairOfTheDog
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To: Mastador1

Cremation is not so “Green” as it takes plenty of energy to complete a cremation. Embalming fluid is not necessary but is usually done even when the body does not cross state lines. There is no reason for embalming when the corpse can be kept at about 35 degrees until ready for veiwing or funeral.


11 posted on 03/27/2014 12:01:24 PM PDT by Monterrosa-24 (...even more American than a French bikini and a Russian AK-47.)
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To: dalereed
Reminds me of a girl from Hong Kong who when traveling across America asked, “Why cremate anybody here?” "There is so much room." Of course no follower of Confucius would consider space for the dead a waste.
12 posted on 03/27/2014 12:05:30 PM PDT by Monterrosa-24 (...even more American than a French bikini and a Russian AK-47.)
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To: Graybeard58

Cremation would be fine with me. There is probably a term for where Urn-contained ashes could be stored indefinitely . I don’t think Mortuary is the right term. I would like someplace to go and peacefully contemplate a loved one now deceased. I would prefer not to store the ashes in my home unless I was confident no one would bother the urn. If I had money to purchase a couple of acres, I would not use it to inter coffins, but solely to display and maintain gravestones. It may sound morbid, but I have often thought about it. My mom died in the eastern part of the country, an area I rarely visit. I have often wished I could set up a quasi tribute headstone over here in the west, one I could easily visit a few times a year. If someone owned such a business, they could easily move it to a new location in case they were leasing, and the property became too expensive to stay there.


13 posted on 03/27/2014 12:05:52 PM PDT by lee martell
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To: Graybeard58

Creamation is where I’m heading since my first choice...trash bag at curb....seems to be frowned upon.


14 posted on 03/27/2014 12:09:32 PM PDT by prisoner6 (FREEDOM)
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To: Monterrosa-24

I noticed this the last time I ate a fast food burger


15 posted on 03/27/2014 12:10:45 PM PDT by inpajamas (http://outskirtspress.com/ONE)
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To: Graybeard58

“But the main reason, as you might expect, is cost. Cremation is cheaper than burial. The average cost of a funeral today is about $6,500, including the typical $2,000-or-more cost of a casket. Add a burial vault, and the average jumps to around $7,700. A cremation, by contrast, typically costs a third of those amounts, or less. In a tough economy like the current one, cost counts – a lot. “

http://www.nbcnews.com/business/business-news/cremation-hottest-trend-funeral-industry-f1B8068228


16 posted on 03/27/2014 12:14:55 PM PDT by skinndogNN
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To: Graybeard58

Cremate me, bake my ashes into a cake with icing that says ‘Eat Me’, send to ex wife


17 posted on 03/27/2014 12:15:48 PM PDT by PaForBush
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To: lee martell

mosoleum, i think


18 posted on 03/27/2014 12:18:24 PM PDT by Shamrock498
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To: lee martell

Mausoleum is the word you’re looking for. As I said above, you can buy a cemetery plot anywhere and place a marker. You don’t have to body to bury. You can bury ashes, you can place a marker.

This has come up a few times in my own family. One instance, the husband of an aunt was estranged from the rest of the family and he did not tell us where he placed her. We bought a marker for her anyway, in the family plot.

Another, a man was widowed twice, decades apart, and both wives were buried in different places. Arrangements had been made at the death of the first to bury him with her, so he was buried with his first wife. He was also given a headstone next to my mom, his second wife.


19 posted on 03/27/2014 12:23:18 PM PDT by HairOfTheDog
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To: Graybeard58
The Creamation of Sam Mcgee

Poem wirtten by Robert W Service. Recited by YouTuber Urgelt

20 posted on 03/27/2014 12:26:35 PM PDT by prisoner6 (FREEDOM)
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To: prisoner6
Another option would be to see if I can be cremated and my ashes mixed into a paving brick. Then see if it could be installed somewhere on main street in Sturgis.

I've always wanted to go to the rally but realize I'll never make it now.

A couple of years ago I considered contacting Sturgis about the possibility. It could be a money maker for somebody.

Maybe one of the bars could keep a small vial of ashes in a back room and when family members visit it could be brought out.

21 posted on 03/27/2014 12:33:19 PM PDT by prisoner6 (FREEDOM)
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To: Graybeard58

Ashes to ashes, dust to dust. God is certainly capable of putting one’s mortal remains back together for resurrection.


22 posted on 03/27/2014 12:35:38 PM PDT by bubbacluck (America 180)
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To: HairOfTheDog

That’s the term; Mausoleum. I used to hear it a lot in Vincent Price movies, but never knew exactly what it meant. This is one of those conversations I cannot have with my adult siblings. It’s just a matter of time before my dad goes. Nobody wants to talk about ‘necessary arrangements’ now but me, so I let it drop, before I leave the wrong impression. Many folks are still rather superstitious about the inevitability or eventuality of death, not choosing to address the topic directly. I don’t have to make them uncomfortable about it, not now anyway.


23 posted on 03/27/2014 12:37:00 PM PDT by lee martell
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To: HairOfTheDog

If you are a veteran or the spouse of a veteran you are entitled to a free grave. My parents grave in a veterans cemetery overlooks the Pacific. They are surrounded by heroes. There is a lot more space available for cremated remains. The reason that I mention this is because I had a cousin who was a veteran. When he died his widow did not know that. I did not say anything because it was not my place to butt in.


24 posted on 03/27/2014 12:38:20 PM PDT by forgotten man
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To: Graybeard58

Aren’t you concerned about the huge carbon footprint you leave behind?

Think of the chiiiiiiiiiiildren.


25 posted on 03/27/2014 12:40:42 PM PDT by 353FMG
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To: Graybeard58

Put my ashes in either one of these.

26 posted on 03/27/2014 12:41:21 PM PDT by Tijeras_Slim
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To: Graybeard58

A sermon outline (breif) on the subject of cremation.

http://executableoutlines.com/top/cremate.htm

Can a Christian chose cremation? Sure. But is it best?

Nope.


27 posted on 03/27/2014 12:41:22 PM PDT by Responsibility2nd (NO LIBS. This Means Liberals and (L)libertarians! Same Thing. NO LIBS!!)
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To: Graybeard58
Cremation gaining acceptance, study shows

I could end up in a place that is very hot, and I don't want to get a head start.

28 posted on 03/27/2014 12:43:40 PM PDT by The Sons of Liberty (Who but a TYRANT shoves down another man's throat what he has exempted himself from?)
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To: Graybeard58

I want to be cremated.

I want my ashes formed into golf balls and every A-hole who wants to take one last whack at me can fire my remains into Monterey Bay...


29 posted on 03/27/2014 12:51:49 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously-you won't live through it anyway-Enjoy Yourself ala Louis Prima)
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To: Responsibility2nd

Thanks for the link.

Pretty much sums up what I believe.


30 posted on 03/27/2014 12:54:46 PM PDT by Catmom (We're all gonna get the punishment only some of us deserve.)
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To: PaForBush

Winnuh!


31 posted on 03/27/2014 12:55:42 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously-you won't live through it anyway-Enjoy Yourself ala Louis Prima)
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To: PaForBush

Your comment is just toooooooo funny. Brightened my day. Thank you.


32 posted on 03/27/2014 12:57:52 PM PDT by Grams A (The Sun will rise in the East in the morning and God is still on his throne.)
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To: wku man

My dad is buried in Kansas, my mom in Missouri and my daughter in Texas. Have never been back to my parent’s sites since their death and not really even sure where they are buried. Do visit my daughter’s burial site and place yellow tulips there once a month.

I have already told my son to have me cremated and put half of the ashes on the top of the mountain at Lionshead in Colorado and half in the Gulf of Mexico. Then go out and celebrate the fact that I had a good life, great friends, and know that they will see me later. Also remind him and my grandsons that although I may not be on this earth any longer, I can see everything they do!


33 posted on 03/27/2014 1:06:15 PM PDT by Grams A (The Sun will rise in the East in the morning and God is still on his throne.)
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To: Mastador1

My husband is going through the same issue with the death of his father.

When his dad died, the man asked for his ashes to be tossed in a river and my husband honored those wishes.

And that was that, until about ten years later. Out of the blue, the grief of his gather’s death finally hit my husband. (I think that it was because he was going through issues with our own son and he desperately wished for his father’s counsel.)

At that time, he desperately needed his dad. And I mean that the need to speak with his father crushed this man. But there was nothing. Nowhere to go. Not even a grave.

He told me several times that this is all he needed. A grave. A headstone. Any tangible way to touch the man who made him. Had there been anything left, he would’ve flown there in a minute.

That killed him for several years. The ache to visit his father’s grave was soul-deep and wouldn’t go away. It took a very long time for him to come to terms with that. That pain lasted longer than the initial death of the man himself. (shock protects us from a lot... until it wears off)

My dad was killed by an illegal back in 1992. At first, I went to the funeral, grieved, then moved on. In 2002, I finally absorbed the loss and went (half way around the world) to visit the cemetery to find his grave to grieve. The cemetery had lost the plot in their records. I wandered for more than 15 hours, searching for my father. In the end, I placed the flowers on a stranger’s grave and asked if they would please tell my dad that I loved him. I curled up and bawled for days after. I’d lost my dad.

I’m not against cremation, but I am against the loss of a ‘final resting place’. There needs to be somewhere for our loved ones to go. I’ve seen and felt that need and it can’t be denied.

I know that it may sound weird to those who haven’t experienced it, but there’s something about a loss that hits you many years later. Then, there is a desperate need to ‘touch’ the one who meant so much to you. To be denied that is almost as painful as experiencing that loss all over again.

Give the grieved a place to go.


34 posted on 03/27/2014 1:11:10 PM PDT by Marie (When are they going to take back Obama's peace prize?)
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To: Grams A

Bkmk


35 posted on 03/27/2014 1:12:54 PM PDT by BigIsleGal (Wake Me Up When the Stupid Wears Off)
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To: Marie

I want to be a tree.

http://www.eternitrees.com/frequently-asked-questions


36 posted on 03/27/2014 1:14:29 PM PDT by Raebie
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To: Raebie

Or a diamond. For my girls. But I can’t be an earring. They’d lose me inside of a week.

http://www.lifegem.com/


37 posted on 03/27/2014 1:17:50 PM PDT by Raebie
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To: lee martell

You’re not morbid. You’re right.

After my family’s experienes with the loss of ashes, we’ve all made a pact and I’m the one who’s agreed to carry it out.

I’m building a crypt on our land that has shelves. Each shelf will carry the ashes and the remembrance book of every individual in there. A lock of hair, a photo, good stories, videos, etc.

When hubby and I die, or if the land is sold, my daughter has agreed to build a crypt for all of us on her land.

The family will stay together. Everyone will have a place to go.

Part of out motivation is that we’re a military family and there are no ‘roots’. We know that things have to stay mobile.


38 posted on 03/27/2014 1:18:26 PM PDT by Marie (When are they going to take back Obama's peace prize?)
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To: prisoner6

You may not value your moral remains once you’re finished with them, but someday, someone you love may need to touch base. Don’t deny them that.


39 posted on 03/27/2014 1:19:35 PM PDT by Marie (When are they going to take back Obama's peace prize?)
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To: Graybeard58

I’m even cheaper. Both myself and my late wife are/were anatomical donors. When the university is done with our bodies they are cremated. No cost to us.


40 posted on 03/27/2014 1:19:57 PM PDT by R. Scott (Humanity i love you because when you're hard up you pawn your Intelligence to buy a drink)
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To: Graybeard58

I used to be all for cremation...then I went to the funeral of a relative who was cremated. It’s weird but there’s no sense of closure...no chance to say goodbye in a sense. It was unsettling. Maybe not everyone feels that way but it was enough to change my mind.


41 posted on 03/27/2014 1:21:58 PM PDT by DouglasKC
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To: prisoner6

LOL! The curbside pickup was my first choice, too.


42 posted on 03/27/2014 1:23:40 PM PDT by Madame Dufarge
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To: Marie
Give the grieved a place to go.

That's the issue for me, I don't have a lot of family. My Dad passed a little over three years ago, my Mom has his ashes with her and she's in her eighties and poor health. Since I am in charge of her will and affairs after she passes I have already told her that I will bring my Grandmother's ashes together with her and my fathers in one place near us, and if my sister and brother can't deal with my spending money to do that tough beans.

43 posted on 03/27/2014 1:28:48 PM PDT by Mastador1 (I'll take a bad dog over a good politician any day!)
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To: Mastador1

You get it.

The mortal remains are not for the dead. We won’t care any more.

It’s comfort for the living.


44 posted on 03/27/2014 1:37:31 PM PDT by Marie (When are they going to take back Obama's peace prize?)
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To: Resolute Conservative

Hitler didn’t give six million a choice!


45 posted on 03/27/2014 1:39:00 PM PDT by ExTexasRedhead
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To: Graybeard58
All I know is that the idea of pumping my body full of preservative chemicals, then putting it in an expensive casket and burying it is the height of absurdity. My first choice would be a "green burial," where they wrap you in a shroud, drop you in a hole and plant a tree on top of you. Unfortunately, you can't do that most places. So cremation it is. And i plan to make my friends do something adventurous like climb a mountaint to scatter the ashes.

Although the burning Viking longship funeral has some appeal, too.

46 posted on 03/27/2014 1:41:34 PM PDT by Bubba Ho-Tep ("More weight!"--Giles Corey)
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To: Graybeard58

I would also prefer cremation. I don’t think I’ve visited family resting places more than twice in the last 10 years.

With the advent of digital media, there will be plenty of memories of me to go around to anyone who cares. I won’t; I’ll be off waiting for the rest of you to join me.


47 posted on 03/27/2014 1:46:27 PM PDT by henkster (I don't like bossy women telling me what words I can't use.)
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To: forgotten man

I don’t think that is true. I went to the veterans website and all your family gets is a flag and some war disabled vets get a few bucks to help with the cost. If you have other information please direct me to it, I’m doing a living will.


48 posted on 03/27/2014 1:50:39 PM PDT by spudville
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To: All

I plan on being cremated. There are too many people who want to piss on my grave. I’m not giving them the pleasure.


49 posted on 03/27/2014 1:58:31 PM PDT by VerySadAmerican (".....Barrack, and the horse Mohammed rode in on.")
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To: Marie

A cousin of my points out another reason to have some type of marker, for future generations to answer questions about their heritage. I agree, it is a place to go to find solace.


50 posted on 03/27/2014 2:01:47 PM PDT by phormer phrog phlyer
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