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The Cruel Sea (1953)
1953 | Ealing Studios

Posted on 03/28/2014 9:50:24 PM PDT by rlmorel

Opening in the autumn of 1939 just as the Battle of the Atlantic begins, Lieutenant-Commander George Ericson, a British Merchant Navy and Royal Naval Reserve officer, is recalled to the Royal Navy and given command of HMS Compass Rose, a newly built Flower class corvette intended for convoy escort duties. His sub-lieutenants, Lockhart and Ferraby, are both newly commissioned and without experience at sea.

The new first lieutenant, James Bennett (Stanley Baker), is an abusive martinet. Despite these initial disadvantages, the ship's company gains hard experience and becomes an effective fighting unit. At first their worst enemy is the weather...


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; History; Music/Entertainment; TV/Movies
KEYWORDS: england; military; navy; wwii
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I had never seen this movie before...with the exception of the really, REALLY cheesy night ocean scenes that looked like they had been shot in a swimming pool, I thought it was an excellent, almost exceptional movie on this subject. When they went to using real footage later in the movie, it was very well done, and an excellent story.

I was very surprised to see this actor below...recognize him?

And the angles and shots were very, very good, I thought in many scenes, including this one where a guy is yelling out the order for the British equivalent of the Special Sea and Anchor Detail.

The footage of ships in heavy seas was very typical...I spent a few months in the North Atlantic back in the Seventies, and it brought back some memories there.

1 posted on 03/28/2014 9:50:24 PM PDT by rlmorel
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To: rlmorel

The difference in the use of filmed models and film footage almost made the movie seem like it had been directed by two different people in turn. But I thought the acting throughout was very good.


2 posted on 03/28/2014 9:52:08 PM PDT by rlmorel ("A nation, despicable by its weakness, forfeits even the privilege of being neutral." A. Hamilton)
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To: rlmorel

Saw ‘Sink the Bismarck’ not long ago, might have some similarities, the Brits used those little planes, World War I vintage to attack that ship.


3 posted on 03/28/2014 10:11:25 PM PDT by BeadCounter (morning glory evening grace)
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To: rlmorel

An uncle joined the Coast Guard in 1942 so he could provide valuable war service by protecting girls at the beach ;)

He got out of training, was sent on the North Africa invasion and spent the rest of the war on convoy escort in the North Atlantic.

When I asked him about it what I got back was &@$€£¥%#!!! Coast Guard.


4 posted on 03/28/2014 10:16:55 PM PDT by Rockpile
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To: rlmorel

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0045659/

trailer:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fSpaKCC6g2M


5 posted on 03/28/2014 10:41:14 PM PDT by iowamark (I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy)
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To: rlmorel

The movie is superb. The book is even better.


6 posted on 03/28/2014 11:09:35 PM PDT by ken5050 (I fear a world run by adults who were never spanked as kids and got trophies just for participating)
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To: BeadCounter

I downloaded the “Sink the Bismarck” in B&W on torrent, I still yet to see that “The Cruel Sea.” My grandpa gave me DVD of the “Battle of Britain.” Seems some British breeds are born warriors, that’s why retaking Falkland almost piece of a cake.


7 posted on 03/29/2014 12:54:45 AM PDT by hamboy
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To: rlmorel
I think LCDR Nicholas Monsarrat’s “The Cruel Sea” is the movie where the corvette, HMS Compass Rose, in order to get at the German submarine, has to go through a group of survivors in the water from the ship just sunk by the sub. The survivors think they're OK until the corvette drops its depth charges on the other side of the survivors. All the men in the water know they're doomed when those depth charges explode. Incredibly wrenching scene — there will be no rescue from certain death.

The Battle of the North Atlantic was a cruel war with very little quarter given by the U-boats or the weather.

8 posted on 03/29/2014 1:58:08 AM PDT by MasterGunner01
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To: rlmorel
"The Cruel Sea" is such a fabulous movie -- HIGHLY recommended, good call.

Then again, pretty much any movie with Jack Hawkins is going to be good. And Stanley "I'm the first leftentant and don't you forget it" Baker -- he is just excellent. "Snorkers, good-oh!"

The line in the movie that says it all, though, that says it all about a lot of things, is when the Captain wearily explains his bad mood: "It's the war. It's the whole bloody war."

9 posted on 03/29/2014 2:37:26 AM PDT by Finny (Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path. -- Psalm 119:105)
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To: iowamark

In that trailer, when Hawkins was speaking to a subordinate, and he called him;”...number one...”. it stirred my memory:
Where have I heard that voice saying a VERY similar thing? (calling someone a number)
Then it came to me -
Ben Hur!


10 posted on 03/29/2014 3:14:37 AM PDT by spankalib ("I freed a thousand slaves. I could have freed a thousand more if only they knew they were slaves.")
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To: spankalib

In the first Star Trek pilot “The Cage,” Majel Barrett was “Number One.” She was later Nurse Chapel in the series.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0059753/


11 posted on 03/29/2014 3:46:53 AM PDT by iowamark (I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy)
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To: rlmorel
The footage of ships in heavy seas was very typical.

I once saw a documentary that explored the old movie making technologies. The hardest scenes to recreate via modeling were ships at sea and fire. The sea scenes were model ships placed in tanks of water and it was almost impossible to create an artifical wave on such a small scale that would look realistic.....

12 posted on 03/29/2014 4:06:34 AM PDT by Hot Tabasco (Under Reagan spring always arrived on time.....)
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To: rlmorel

An excellent movie - one of the best. Despite the carping about blending scenes with actual footage, it is a superb tribute to the men who fought the battle of the Atlantic.

It’s one of the few war movies I’d recommend (the other two are the Bridges at Toko Ri and Sands of Iwo Jima).


13 posted on 03/29/2014 4:14:54 AM PDT by Chainmail (A simple rule of life: if you can be blamed, you're responsible.)
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To: Rockpile

My father joined the CG for very much the same reason at the end of 1940, he felt there was going to be a war. Spent the end of 1941 through the 1944 on convoy escort.

Was sent West to Kali to pick up a new ship for the invasion of Japan. His opinion was very much the same as your Uncle.


14 posted on 03/29/2014 5:07:51 AM PDT by Little Bill (EVICT Queen Jean)
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To: Chainmail
I feel tears well up whenever I watch Toko Ri. Scenes are from my era in Japan.
15 posted on 03/29/2014 5:32:18 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (Rip it out by the roots.)
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To: ken5050

I’m not a book person. I have read very few books in my life, but when I was a teenager, I read “The Cruel Sea” and was enthralled by it. I recall being scared to death, as I was transported aboard the “HMS Compass Rose”.


16 posted on 03/29/2014 5:54:28 AM PDT by faucetman ( Just the facts, ma'am, Just the facts)
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To: Hot Tabasco
A precursor ( for lack of a better term) of "The Cruel Sea" is Noel Cowrard's "In Which We Serve" .

This was filmed in 1941..It's the classic home front rally the people type of movie, made when the war's outcome was still in the balance. It's a great film..

The "ocean scenes" look like they were made in a swimming pool with an 8mm camera..

17 posted on 03/29/2014 6:18:50 AM PDT by ken5050 (I fear a world run by adults who were never spanked as kids and got trophies just for participating)
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To: Hot Tabasco; rlmorel
The sea scenes were model ships placed in tanks of water and it was almost impossible to create an artifical wave on such a small scale that would look realistic

I've long wondered if adding soap to breakup the water's surface tension, or using some entirely different liquid could have achieved better results?

18 posted on 03/29/2014 6:50:56 AM PDT by fso301
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

Me too. Really captures the tragedy of the lost lives. Bill Holden really did a great job in that role.


19 posted on 03/29/2014 7:32:02 AM PDT by Chainmail (A simple rule of life: if you can be blamed, you're responsible.)
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To: Chainmail

I was an Army Brat in Japan, 1951-1961.
We made six crossings of the Pacific on MSTS during that decade.

MSTS was often called “The Army’s Navy.” Civilian skipper and crew, named for long dead Army heros. Our last trip back was on the General W. A. Mann into Oakland, CA.

Troops on the fantail and bow. Military dependents in five levels, bunched in tiny staterooms in the midsection. Two weeks at sea on each crosing.


20 posted on 03/29/2014 7:39:54 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (Rip it out by the roots.)
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To: rlmorel
Is that Denholm Elliot? He was in a bunch of movies including Raiders of the Lost Ark.

Garde la Foi, mes amis! Nous nous sommes les sauveurs de la République! Maintenant et Toujours!
(Keep the Faith, my friends! We are the saviors of the Republic! Now and Forever!)

LonePalm, le Républicain du verre cassé (The Broken Glass Republican)

21 posted on 03/29/2014 8:03:46 AM PDT by LonePalm (Commander and Chef)
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To: LonePalm

Yes! And, of course, “Trading Places”!


22 posted on 03/29/2014 9:04:45 AM PDT by rlmorel ("A nation, despicable by its weakness, forfeits even the privilege of being neutral." A. Hamilton)
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To: Rockpile

Heh, I stongly suspect that at any time from the Roman Army to today, you would hear “&@$€£¥%#!!! (INSERT SERVICE HERE)


23 posted on 03/29/2014 9:07:29 AM PDT by rlmorel ("A nation, despicable by its weakness, forfeits even the privilege of being neutral." A. Hamilton)
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To: rlmorel
Damn, now the rest of my year is shot. I get about one pop culture question right per year. Please don't ask how I picked him out or remembered the name. I have no clue.

I was in the Publix (supermarket) checkout line last Monday evening and realized I couldn't have named a single person on the tabloid covers if their name hadn't been printed there. I was uncertain which person a few of the names referred to.

Garde la Foi, mes amis! Nous nous sommes les sauveurs de la République! Maintenant et Toujours!
(Keep the Faith, my friends! We are the saviors of the Republic! Now and Forever!)

LonePalm, le Républicain du verre cassé (The Broken Glass Republican)

24 posted on 03/29/2014 9:26:20 AM PDT by LonePalm (Commander and Chef)
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To: BeadCounter; rlmorel; Finny; Chainmail; faucetman

Bead, “those little planes, WW1 vintage” were Fairey Swordfish torpedo bombes. They were designed during the 1930s and obsolete in 1939, but continued on being used by the Royal Navy because the got the job done. And also the Italians and Germans didn’t have aircraft carriers with fighters to escort and defend their ships.

One of several sites where you can get info about the Swordfish: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fairey_Swordfish

To all: Yes, I read the book in high school, several times and it led me to Horatio Hornblower series. There is a second book similar to “The Cruel Sea” and nearly as good, is “HMS Marlborough Will Enter Harbour.”


25 posted on 03/29/2014 9:41:36 AM PDT by GreyFriar ( Spearhead - 3rd Armored Division 75-78 & 83-87)
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To: spankalib; iowamark

And don’t forget that Picard called his executive officer, Commander William Riker, “Number One,” it is an old Royal Navy expression/designation


26 posted on 03/29/2014 9:46:35 AM PDT by GreyFriar ( Spearhead - 3rd Armored Division 75-78 & 83-87)
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To: ken5050; rlmorel; iowamark; BeadCounter

Ken, I agree with you 200%. This is a definite ‘must read’ war novel. Story of the men who sailed and fought in the little ships of the fleet.


27 posted on 03/29/2014 9:48:54 AM PDT by GreyFriar ( Spearhead - 3rd Armored Division 75-78 & 83-87)
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To: GreyFriar; BeadCounter; rlmorel; Finny; Chainmail; faucetman

Both we and the British were unprepared in many ways, and had to fight early on with weapons that were inferior to the demands, as we found out with Torpedo Squadron 8 at the Battle of Midway.

Those guys had a lot of guts.

One of my favorite movies is, in many ways, “The Caine Mutiny”, and in that movie, the scene where the officers are celebrating after Queeg self-destructed at the Court Martial.

The lawyer comes in, three sheets to the wind, and dresses them down because, in the end, they were responsible in many respects for what happened, more so than Queeg.

He was a guy serving through peacetime with crappy equipment, and took that same equipment up into the North Atlantic on convoy duty in an undeclared shooting war, while these guys were still snot-faced college boys cheering the football team. He cracked, as a lot of good men did, because they had “a bellyful” and couldn’t take any more.

The comments of the captain in this movie brought that to mind for me. It’s the bloody war.


28 posted on 03/29/2014 9:52:42 AM PDT by rlmorel ("A nation, despicable by its weakness, forfeits even the privilege of being neutral." A. Hamilton)
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To: rlmorel; BeadCounter; Finny; Chainmail; faucetman

I agree. In the movie, it was Jose Ferrer who played the lawyer who defended the junior officers and then verbally lashed them for their lack of support/understanding/action in producing Quegg’s breakdown while in command.


29 posted on 03/29/2014 10:08:20 AM PDT by GreyFriar ( Spearhead - 3rd Armored Division 75-78 & 83-87)
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To: rlmorel

The Cruel Sea (1953)
http://stagevu.com/video/erjlggygbygt


30 posted on 03/29/2014 10:14:12 AM PDT by JoeProBono (SOME IMAGES MAY BE DISTURBING VIEWER DISCRETION IS ADVISED;-{)
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To: GreyFriar; rlmorel; iowamark; BeadCounter
Here's another novel of WW II naval action you might enjoy. It's one of my favorites.

Many of Alistair MacClean's WW II thrillers were made into successful, big-budget films..."Where Eagles Dare" "The Guns of Navarone."

His first novel, "HMS Ulysses",is IMHO, in many ways his best work. MacClean served in the RN the first years of the war. He did a few Murmansk convoys (which had atrocious casualty rates) and his ship was part of the successful hunt for the Tirpitz. He based "HMS Ulysses" on his own experiences, as well as the story of Convoy PQ-17, where 24 of the 35 ships bound for Murmansk were sunk, a horrendous toll.

If you can find it, well worth the read..It's superb.

31 posted on 03/29/2014 10:20:28 AM PDT by ken5050 (I fear a world run by adults who were never spanked as kids and got trophies just for participating)
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To: ken5050; rlmorel; iowamark; BeadCounter

Ken,

Good Heavens, YES! HMS Ulysses, I’m kicking myself for forgetting that one. It is excellent, but I must admit, that The Cruel Sea is my favorite of the 3. and it was never made into a movie, drat


32 posted on 03/29/2014 10:45:12 AM PDT by GreyFriar ( Spearhead - 3rd Armored Division 75-78 & 83-87)
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To: rlmorel
Absolutely!!! Spot on!

I love the Caine Mutiny -- the book is even better than the movie -- and you nailed my favorite scene. When Jose Ferrer hoists a toast to "the real author of the Caine Mutiny." He tosses the champagne into the face of Fred MacMurray, and tells him, "If you want to do something about it, I'll be outside. I'm a lot drunker than you are, so it oughtta be a fair fight."

I get goose bumps every time.

You are so right, though, that the Queegs of the day were heroes in their own right, holding the post when nothing was going on, and then to be dissed by snotty superior "intellects" like Lt. Keefer (MacMurray) was contemptible.

Never thought of comparing the two movies, but you're right.

I also love, love love "Bridge on the River Kwai." Of course it has Jack Hawkins! But the mindset and rationale of Col. Nicholson (Guinness) in some ways reminds me of the "win at all costs" Republicans acting to endorse and place in power an agent of the corrupt use of amoral government, in order to "defeat" the enemy that is an agent of the same.

33 posted on 03/29/2014 10:58:58 AM PDT by Finny (Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path. -- Psalm 119:105)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

Army brat in Japan 1956-58.

We saw friends off from Yokohama on a grey passenger ship called the General E.D. Patrick. Tiny staterooms, brass portholes, & warnings in the passages for kids to beware of steel doors that could slam in heavy seas.

Ticker tape sendoff from dockside to ship. I actually thought all that tape would prevent the ship from casting off.


34 posted on 03/29/2014 11:55:20 AM PDT by elcid1970 ("In the modern world, Muslims are living fossils.")
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To: elcid1970
There were two Particks in MSTS.

They were the Edwin D. Patrick and the Mason M. Patrick (also known as the Mickey Mouse.) We were on both ships on a run to Yokohama or back to Seattle.

Along with the W. A. Mann, we also sailed on the Wm O. Darby and the G. M Randall. Five ships and six trips across the Pacific.

All but the last voyage was Seattle-Yokohama or Yokohama-Seattle.

One of these girls was reported to have broken in half at her moorings but was raised, welded together and resumed troop and dependent transportation during the Korean campaign.

I remember the bands played and we threw streamers down to the folks on the dock. The paper streamers parted and the band marched off as we pulled away via local tugs. It seems like a lifetime ago...

35 posted on 03/29/2014 12:12:08 PM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (Rip it out by the roots.)
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To: GreyFriar; BeadCounter; Finny; Chainmail; faucetman

Thank you for the recommendations...I will absolutely read all three. I have never read any of them, and have always thought myself well read on Naval affairs, but...I guess I can’t be, if I have missed these books!


36 posted on 03/29/2014 12:56:49 PM PDT by rlmorel ("A nation, despicable by its weakness, forfeits even the privilege of being neutral." A. Hamilton)
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To: ken5050

Thanks ken5050, I am going to get them all reserved in my library network (which is quite good, covering half of our state) when I get home from work tonight!


37 posted on 03/29/2014 12:58:37 PM PDT by rlmorel ("A nation, despicable by its weakness, forfeits even the privilege of being neutral." A. Hamilton)
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To: GreyFriar; ken5050; BeadCounter; Finny; Chainmail; faucetman

There are a few things I really appreciated about “The Caine Mutiny” and reinforced by what I saw in this movie:

1.) Command is a lonely thing, especially at sea. You can’t really be friends with many people, and you have to insulate a lot of other people from the agony and deliberations of the decisions you have to make. It doesn’t mean you can’t consult with others...they just can’t share in the worst parts of making those decisions, and you can’t put it on them.

2.) Both movies (”The Cruel Sea” and “The Caine Mutiny”) are primarily about leadership. In “The Cruel Sea”, it is the loneliness of it, and how even your XO can’t really share parts of it. In “The Caine Mutiny”, it is about working inside a chain of command, and how you have to act the same and do your job to the best of your ability whether your CO is an absolute jerk and nutcase, or a lovable guy. In the military, you NEVER get to choose, that is your lot once you are in it. And, in the case of “The Caine Mutiny”, it is as much about supporting those above you as it is supporting the people below you. It ALSO is about keeping in mind that, no matter how bad a CO might seem to be, as sure as God made little green apples, there is surely a CO out there who is FAR worse.

I guess all of this is true to a degree in civilian life, except in civilian life, you can walk away from it, the choice is yours.


38 posted on 03/29/2014 1:09:02 PM PDT by rlmorel ("A nation, despicable by its weakness, forfeits even the privilege of being neutral." A. Hamilton)
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To: MasterGunner01

I can’t imagine it.

I was on a carrier, which, no matter how rough the sea got, was not likely to have much happen to it, the worst likely being walking into a bulkhead or spilling your coffee. Below decks, that is...above decks, you can definitely go over the side (sometimes with the help of some focused jet exhaust) which is probably a LOT worse than going over on a frigate, since you have that long fall to the water that probably makes it more like hitting a sidewalk from 20 feet than falling ten feet into the water.

In any case, the water is then the worst enemy you have, assuming you aren’t in the South Pacific somewhere. When we were up above the Arctic Circle in Nov/Dec, they told us if you go over the side, the clock starts ticking pretty quick for you, and unless there is a helo already in the air, you probably haven’t got much of a chance.

I remember standing up there and looking down at that dark black/blue ocean from the flight deck, and thinking how cold it would be to go in there. It was very sobering.

Watching that movie last night, I thought the most gripping part was when the HMS Compass Rose was sunk. That was the most gripping ship sinking scene I have seen in cinema (Titanic special effects and the Propeller Guy not withstanding)

The part of that scene that got me was the captain standing over the voice tube, listening to the screams of the trapped, soon to be dead-at-the-bottom-of-the-ocean men, screaming out the last moments of their lives for him to vividly hear. It literally made me shudder. And later, when the Captain had a flashback on his new ship, one had to wonder: How does a man go back out to sea after that? I have often wondered the same thing about the USMC veterans of the South Pacific. After going through a nightmare like Tarawa or Peleliu, how on earth could you gird yourself to do another landing on another island? It boggles the mind. It would be one thing if you were ignorant, but...if you had already done it...

A cruel sea, indeed.


39 posted on 03/29/2014 1:25:51 PM PDT by rlmorel ("A nation, despicable by its weakness, forfeits even the privilege of being neutral." A. Hamilton)
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To: rlmorel

My pleasure. Do let me know what you thought of it..


40 posted on 03/29/2014 1:30:15 PM PDT by ken5050 (I fear a world run by adults who were never spanked as kids and got trophies just for participating)
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To: Chainmail; Hot Tabasco; fso301; Finny

Dang, I hope I didn’t sound like I was carping about it, because I didn’t feel like I was.

I began watching the movie late a night or two before, and couldn’t finish it, and when I got through the first nighttime ocean scenes which weren’t very good (I thought) I very nearly didn’t watch the rest of the movie, even though the acting on the sets and the themes were very good.

But, I got home late from work last night, and decided to watch the rest of it. I sure am glad that I did. An excellent portrayal, IMO. There was a lot of naval detail in that movie that I thought would stand up to the dissection of anyone who has ever been on a warship.

Very well done!


41 posted on 03/29/2014 1:32:58 PM PDT by rlmorel ("A nation, despicable by its weakness, forfeits even the privilege of being neutral." A. Hamilton)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks; elcid1970

Your description of those ships brought to mind one of the most moving and memorable parts of a book that I have ever read.

There was a book about the Chosin Reservoir campaign called “Cold as Hell”, and in the book the author describes when the transport ship (like one of those described) left San Francisco with thousands of Marines on board on a dark night.

The surrounding hills were dotted with lights that gave them a magical look, and the multitude of the people on the dock began singing “Goodnight Irene”, a popular song of the day. Everybody, even those on the ship joined in as the ship pulled away from the dock...

When you hear the song today, you can only imagine how achingly beautiful and poignantly sad that scene must have been. Many of those men never came back.

It was a different time.


42 posted on 03/29/2014 1:38:53 PM PDT by rlmorel ("A nation, despicable by its weakness, forfeits even the privilege of being neutral." A. Hamilton)
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To: rlmorel

It was a marvelous book-—I’ve read it several times over the years.

.


43 posted on 03/29/2014 1:39:18 PM PDT by Mears
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To: rlmorel
Dang, I hope I didn’t sound like I was carping about it, because I didn’t feel like I was.

I didn't think so........but if you feel the needs to make amends, send me a hundred dollars and you can purge yourself of the guilt........ :)

44 posted on 03/29/2014 1:48:45 PM PDT by Hot Tabasco (Under Reagan spring always arrived on time.....)
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To: rlmorel
Herman Wouk (Caine Mutiny) also wrote the very excellent Winds of War and War and Remembrance books. A very enjoyable full-on history of WWII from an American Naval officer's perspective, for the most part. Inspired me to read Rise & Fall of the Third Reich, and Arms of Krupp, a couple of scary-ass tomes.
45 posted on 03/29/2014 1:52:04 PM PDT by Finny (Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path. -- Psalm 119:105)
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To: Finny
Herman Wouk (Caine Mutiny) also wrote the very excellent Winds of War and War and Remembrance books. A very enjoyable full-on history of WWII from an American Naval officer's perspective, for the most part.

War and Remembrance, and it's accompanying TV Mini-Series, probably was the best overall chronicle of the horrors of The Holocaust.

46 posted on 03/29/2014 1:53:44 PM PDT by dfwgator
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To: rlmorel
True. They're both about leadership, profoundly, exactly. Good point! For me, Caine Mutiny was really more about the leadership of Keith's part, and so ... so insightful. Herman Wouk has a way of doing that. You will love the book. I've been a reader since I can remember. I cut my teeth on Steinbeck's Cannery Row and Sweet Thursday, not exactly good influences! {^) (But Tai Pan by James Clavell, another absolultely fabulous novel I read very young, counterbalanced it I like to think!). I read Caine Mutiny when I was in my late 20s. When I finished, I did something I never felt compelled to do before, nor since. I closed the book, put it down, and said outloud (in my very cool little studio apartment) to no one at all, "Now, THAT was a novel."
47 posted on 03/29/2014 2:01:08 PM PDT by Finny (Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path. -- Psalm 119:105)
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To: Hot Tabasco

Heh, I was born a Catholic, so I have a large reservoir of guilt to expunge!


48 posted on 03/29/2014 4:21:13 PM PDT by rlmorel ("A nation, despicable by its weakness, forfeits even the privilege of being neutral." A. Hamilton)
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To: dfwgator

I just watched “Winds of War” on Netflix for the first time last month.

Loved Robert Mitchum. Perfect for that role.

I’ll have to watch “War and Remembrance”.


49 posted on 03/29/2014 4:22:27 PM PDT by rlmorel ("A nation, despicable by its weakness, forfeits even the privilege of being neutral." A. Hamilton)
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To: rlmorel

War and Remembrance is awesome....but be warned, there are some incredibly brutal scenes, especially for a made-for-TV series.


50 posted on 03/29/2014 4:23:46 PM PDT by dfwgator
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