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The 7 Reasons America Became A Great Power
Rightwing News ^ | 4-2-14 | John Hawkins

Posted on 04/03/2014 3:00:56 AM PDT by kingattax

We hear a great deal about how America needs to be “changed” by people who don’t seem to know America’s history, understand our country’s uniqueness, or appreciate how good we’ve had it as a people.

Until you understand what made America a great nation to begin with, you have no business suggesting any changes to the policies, tradition, and culture that made us so uniquely successful.

It’s not an accident that America became a great power. It’s because of these seven reasons.

(Excerpt) Read more at rightwingnews.com ...


TOPICS: History
KEYWORDS:

1 posted on 04/03/2014 3:00:56 AM PDT by kingattax
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To: kingattax

The Constitution for the United States is the crowning achievement of Western civilization. The NATURAL RIGHTS of mankind are specifically acknowledged. The Constitution explicitly states the purpose of and reason for government is to secure these rights.

The creation of the United States is our greatest achievement. From that Liberty and prosperity has flowed. Health, wealth and well being has never been greater. We have brought mankind to the stars. Communism has subjected mankind to poverty and brutality, killing hundreds of millions to achieve its Utopian ends, it has sent mankind to the depths of Hell.


2 posted on 04/03/2014 3:29:00 AM PDT by Ray76 (Take over the GOP? You still beg. Fight for what's right. Forget them.)
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To: kingattax
I think Dave Dougherty and I better identified what we'd call the Four Pillars of American Exceptionalism in our "Patriot's History of the Modern a World": 1) a Christian, mostly Protestant religious foundation; 2) common law; a free market; private property with written titles and deeds. All of the things he identifies are the results of these factors. Other nations have/have had strong militaries, resources, and constitutions that, in theory, limited government. But these didn't produce America.

For fun, I compared the constitution of Cameroon with ours---very much the same. But Cameroon has a genuine dictator, vs Obama who so far is constrained by (occasionally) the Supreme Court, the House, and elections.

3 posted on 04/03/2014 3:38:18 AM PDT by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
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To: LS

Christian mores, freedom of exchange (a free market with no combines), private property, and rule of law (written rules, written records)

All else HAS failed.


4 posted on 04/03/2014 3:52:41 AM PDT by Ray76 (Take over the GOP? You still beg! Fight for what's right. Forget them.)
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To: kingattax

In America, every citizen is responsible for his own security and has the right to bear arms in order to maintain it. This puts the monopoly of force, necessary for the security of the state, at the lowest and most disperesed possible level.

All of our freedoms stem from this one freedom. The right to not be messed with, and the firepower to back that up.

The American People, freed from the shackles of repressive government, responded by building the greatest nation in the history of the World.


5 posted on 04/03/2014 4:04:33 AM PDT by Haiku Guy (Health Care Haiku: If You Have a Right / To the Labor I Provide / I Must Be Your Slave)
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To: kingattax
I don't disagree with any of these, though one of them (industrial capacity) might be missing the mark.

What's overlooked in this article is the importance of being "new." And by this I mean the U.S. is one of the few places in the world where land titles and property ownership can be traced back continuously through the entire history of human settlement in the modern age. This is absolutely critical in any economic system built on bank financing and mortgages.

6 posted on 04/03/2014 4:17:38 AM PDT by Alberta's Child ("I've never seen such a conclave of minstrels in my life.")
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To: LS

Would you please clarify what is meant by “Protestant religious foundation” as distinguished from “Christianity”.


7 posted on 04/03/2014 4:17:56 AM PDT by Ray76 (Take over the GOP? You still beg! Fight for what's right. Forget them.)
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To: LS
LS. I would second that. Christianity not only teaches people to obey the law but to do it from a heart level not just as a man pleaser. That give us a society that acts consistently whether anyone is watching them or not. Also it is the basis for the concept that rights come from God not government.
8 posted on 04/03/2014 4:21:50 AM PDT by virgil283 (When the sun spins, the cross appears, and the skies burn red)
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To: LS

This Hawkins guy doesn’t seem to be the sharpest tool in the shed. Some of his commentary is flat out stupid even when he does get something right. In particular the comment about Western Culture being a main strength, and then citing Venezuelans as being a counter example. Where does he think Venezuelan culture comes from the Incas? Dolt.

The fact that free markets and common law are not even cited (as you did) indicates that he’s utterly clueless.

Heck, citing a strong military is particularly egregious in its silliness. The U.S. did not really have a strong military at all except in bursts until after WW II. It’s hard to justify us being a world power based on something we only picked up after being a world power.


9 posted on 04/03/2014 4:37:51 AM PDT by drbuzzard (All animals are created equal, but some are more equal than others.)
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To: kingattax
7) A Constitution That Limited Centralized Government:

It wasn’t what government did that made America great, it was what the Constitution prevented the government from doing that allowed America to become great.

The Constitution is the only reason America became a great power.

Many of today’s Americans have never experienced the freedom a government with limited powers of legislation allows. The elected discovered they can get more votes by ignoring their oath to defend the Constitution and advocate more favors from the Treasury that their powers of legislation permit.

"Do not blame Caesar, blame the people of Rome who have so enthusiastically acclaimed and adored him and rejoiced in their loss of freedom and danced in his path and given him triumphal processions. Blame the people who hail him when he speaks in the Forum of the new wonderful good society which shall now be Rome's, interpreted to mean more money, more ease, more security, and more living fatly at the expense of the industrious." --Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 BC)

"When the law no longer protects you from the corrupt, but protects the corrupt from you - you know your nation is doomed."

10 posted on 04/03/2014 4:56:42 AM PDT by MosesKnows (Love many, trust few, and always paddle your own canoe.)
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To: kingattax
Here's my seven reasons:

1. Barack Obama wasn't President

2. Harry Reid wasn't Senate Majority leader

3. Nancy Pelosi wasn't Speaker of the House

4. John Roberts wasn't Chief Justice

5. There was no "Great Society"

6. The mainstream media was only mildly biased and corrupt

7. No one called the Constitution a "living document"

11 posted on 04/03/2014 5:14:11 AM PDT by Sicon ("All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others." - G. Orwell)
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To: kingattax
hm.. not sure I agree with that much of that list.

- protestant work ethic

- limited government at all levels, especially the federal level

- abundant resources

- unbridled capitalism

- willingness to nearly exterminate the natives

- restrictive immigration policy that protected the culture for the most part and enabled an English speaking super majority.

- success in recruiting the best and brightest from elsewhere to come here from their home countries where they were either under appreciated or outright discriminated against.

- plus, we were blessed with the greatest founding fathers in the history of the world which make the intellectuals of today look like complete morons.

- willingness to fight to protect or expand.

- restricted voting rights for most of our history to only those who had earned the right.

12 posted on 04/03/2014 5:15:57 AM PDT by TexasFreeper2009 (Obama lied .. the economy died.)
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To: LS
1) a Christian, mostly Protestant religious foundation;

You mean like, Vicky Gene Robinson's Episcopalians?

13 posted on 04/03/2014 5:29:23 AM PDT by Last Dakotan
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To: Ray76; LS

I’ll take a stab at it.

American Catholics don’t like to hear it, but Catholicism till quite recently was utterly hostile to everything America stood for.

The idea of democracy and enforceable human rights as against the State, for instance, emerged in a Protestant nation, England.

Catholicism specifically denounced as heresy the very idea of individual religious freedom up thru at least the latter 19th century.

Catholic religious hierarchy would seem to make the Church more comfortable with secular aristocracy than Protestantism inherently is.


14 posted on 04/03/2014 5:46:39 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: Sherman Logan

exactly.

America was primarily founded by protestants FLEEING from Catholic countries where they were persecuted.


15 posted on 04/03/2014 5:55:05 AM PDT by TexasFreeper2009 (Obama lied .. the economy died.)
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To: TexasFreeper2009

I like your list.

I will add that they only exterminated the natives when necessary. Most other cultures would have gone and solved the problem permanently. The USA went for forced relocation on an on going basis rather than extermination.

I will also add that the USA really rose to power after the WWII smashed up everyone else.


16 posted on 04/03/2014 6:32:18 AM PDT by staytrue
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To: staytrue

Forced re-location resulted in mass deaths, so the result was the same (and I am ok with that) because if we had not cleared the continent of them for the most part... we would now be in a south/central american situation at best or a south africa type situation at worse.

In the end, it was either us or them. And it may seem heartless but in that situation I will choose us every time.

Unlike most, I see man as he is, not as how I would prefer him to be. And I have no doubt that given the chance any other people or race would have wiped white Europeans off the face of the earth and taken everything they have.


17 posted on 04/03/2014 6:49:47 AM PDT by TexasFreeper2009 (Obama lied .. the economy died.)
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To: kingattax

I think America is great, and that is because of history and the leadership of many many people.

What is happening however is we are now facing a bigger challenge.

China.

China has five times our population, and (much) cheaper labor pool, and a strongly nationalistic government which does not allow equal treatment under the law. The country limits companies to Chinese ownership, and prevents foreign (American in other words) ownership of land.

China is doing to America, what America earlier did to the world. Except they are doing it, not simply by competing, but by setting up laws which discriminate.

China is in the drivers seat, and both American parties are playing along.

The problem is, China is getting ever stronger, and ever more sophisticated.

China is a very formidable competitor, and America faces a real threat if we continue to just go along.

I’m not sure how to best deal with China, but what we are currently doing is simply surrendering.

Rapidly.


18 posted on 04/03/2014 6:57:25 AM PDT by Cringing Negativism Network (http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/balance/c5700.html#2013)
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To: LS

Compare the Constitution of the United States with the Constituiton of the USSR or the Islamic Republic of Iran. Both of those countries had/have very nice Constitutions guaranteeing all sorts of Rights, although there are certain “nuances” squirreled away in the documents that were/are used to deny all of those rights. The important thing is not what the document says but what the body politic does. The document by itself is a scrap of paper, and is used as such most places in the world.

America’s great achievement was to live out the document as a way of public life. And it worked...for a while anyway. I’m afraid it’s pretty much a scrap of paper now, just like every other place on earth.


19 posted on 04/03/2014 7:03:45 AM PDT by henkster (I don't like bossy women telling me what words I can't use.)
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To: Ray76; Sherman Logan; TexasFreeper2009

“....clarify what is meant by “Protestant religious foundation vs Christianity...”

Not just protestant, but a very particular flavor. Hard scrabble hard core backwoods hillbilly flavor.

“A Hessian captain, fighting on behalf of the British, told a friend in Germany in 1778, “call this war, dearest friend, by whatsoever name you may, only call it not an American Revolution, it is nothing more nor less than an Irish-Scotch Presbyterian Rebellion.”

40%+/- of Washington’s duration troops were first or second generation Ulster Scots as were the Over the Mountain Men in Carolinas as well.

Read more in The Journal of the American Revolution.

http://allthingsliberty.com/2013/09/presbyterian-rebellion/

Google American Revolution and Presbyterianism for the full effect of the Scottish Reformation (John Knox)and Scots Age of Enlightenment (Adam Smith for example) on America’s founding and intended character.


20 posted on 04/03/2014 7:09:02 AM PDT by Lowell1775
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To: staytrue

“...the USA really rose to power after the WWII smashed up everyone else.”

The world’s industrial numbers were overwhelmingly American by 1871. We were just the quiet guy in the bar while all the noisy dwarves bragged and squabbled.

http://www.economist.com/blogs/graphicdetail/2012/06/daily-chart-8


21 posted on 04/03/2014 7:09:02 AM PDT by Lowell1775
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To: staytrue

Correction - We became a world power by smashing everyone else. The Army Air Force blasted Germany and Japan to rubble. The two atomic bombs only did 3% of the damage to Japan.


22 posted on 04/03/2014 7:21:39 AM PDT by SpeakerToAnimals (I hope to earn a name in battle)
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To: kingattax

America Became A Great Power...

Don’t worry, Obama’s working as hard as he can to correct that...


23 posted on 04/03/2014 7:45:37 AM PDT by JimRed (Excise the cancer before it kills us; feed & water the Tree of Liberty! TERM LIMITS NOW & FOREVER!)
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To: TexasFreeper2009
America was primarily founded by protestants FLEEING from Catholic countries where they were persecuted.

Not exactly. There were some Heugenots, but in actuality America got surprisingly few immigrants from Catholic-ruled countries prior to the Revolution, or indeed after it until the Italians started arriving in the late 19th century.

The Puritans, Scotch-Irish and Catholic Irish were to varying degrees refugees from religious persecution, but it was by the Church of England (or Ireland), not Roman Catholics.

24 posted on 04/03/2014 7:52:56 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: SpeakerToAnimals

The european part of wwII was really about Germany vs. Russia.

probably 20 million dead on each side.

And russia was getting the better of germany before the USA entered.

Now the English and Americans certainly made the russian job easier by opening the 2nd front.

In the comedy Hogan’s Heros, there was a really good reason why every german in that show trembled with idea of being sent to the russian front.


25 posted on 04/03/2014 7:53:22 AM PDT by staytrue
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To: Lowell1775

I think the “Presbyterian rebellion” notion can only be maintained if one uses the term quite loosely, lumping in Congregationalists, which the Brits and Loyalists of the time probably did.

New Englanders were almost all Congregationalists, not Presbyterians proper. The South was dominated by C of E, which in some colonies was the Established Church.

Presbyterians were primarily Scots or Scotch-Irish and were mostly found on the frontier or in the Middle Colonies, especially PA.

I’d be interested if you have a reference for the 40% number. Sounds high to me.

Ran across an interesting site for religion of the 208 men it classifies as Founders. 55% were Episcopal/C of E. Presbyterians were at 19% and Congregationalists at 17%. Big dropoff thereafter.

http://www.adherents.com/gov/Founding_Fathers_Religion.html

I don’t think the Presbyterians can accurately be claimed as dominant in the Revolution, despite what its opponents may have said at the time.


26 posted on 04/03/2014 8:18:31 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: henkster

But my interest is in why that happened, and my answer is the “Four Pillars.”


27 posted on 04/03/2014 9:23:43 AM PDT by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
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To: Last Dakotan; Sherman Logan; TexasFreeper2009; LS

“...a Christian, mostly Protestant religious foundation”

Not just Protestant...but a very specific flavor. Backwoods hillbilly hardcore and hardscrabble. At the time, Ulster Presbyterianism.

40%+/- of Washington’s enlisted troops and the Over the Mountain Men in the Carolinas were of the same ilk just as example.

“A Hessian captain, fighting on behalf of the British, told a friend in Germany in 1778, “call this war, dearest friend, by whatsoever name you may, only call it not an American Revolution, it is nothing more nor less than an Irish-Scotch Presbyterian Rebellion.”

More in Journal of American Revolution.

http://allthingsliberty.com/2013/09/presbyterian-rebellion/

Google Scottish Enlightenment (Adam Smith) and Scots Reformation (John Knox) if you seek the kernels of our liberties and American character.


28 posted on 04/03/2014 9:25:25 AM PDT by Lowell1775
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To: Last Dakotan; Sherman Logan; TexasFreeper2009; LS

“...a Christian, mostly Protestant religious foundation”

Not just Protestant...but a very specific flavor. Backwoods hillbilly hardcore and hardscrabble. At the time, Ulster Presbyterianism.

40%+/- of Washington’s enlisted troops and the Over the Mountain Men in the Carolinas were of the same ilk just as example.

“A Hessian captain, fighting on behalf of the British, told a friend in Germany in 1778, “call this war, dearest friend, by whatsoever name you may, only call it not an American Revolution, it is nothing more nor less than an Irish-Scotch Presbyterian Rebellion.”

More in Journal of American Revolution.

http://allthingsliberty.com/2013/09/presbyterian-rebellion/

Google Scottish Enlightenment (Adam Smith) and Scots Reformation (John Knox) if you seek the kernels of our liberties and American character.


29 posted on 04/03/2014 9:25:25 AM PDT by Lowell1775
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To: Sherman Logan

This is absolutely correct. American Catholicism, although MUCH more “latitudinarian” than European Catholicism, nevertheless usually came from a culture infused with socialism and communalism (France, Italy, Germany, or Ireland). It is a statistical fact, that Tom Sowell shows, that Irish have much preferred to work in government, the police, fire, rather than start businesses. Many of the southern European Catholics arrived seeing the president as no different from a king or dictator and had virtually no understanding of “republicanism.”


30 posted on 04/03/2014 9:26:22 AM PDT by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
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To: Ray76

Yes, virtually ALL the colonies, even Maryland, were heavily protestant. Even PA with the Quakers had strong German Protestant influences. In other words, the US was not primarily ever a Catholic nation. This generally, though not always, meant that there was less of willingness to tolerate top-down governance, and rather a tendency to embrace bottom up common-law governance.


31 posted on 04/03/2014 9:28:42 AM PDT by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
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To: virgil283

Yes, this is from Jeremiah and also Corinthians, where God says He writes the laws “on the hearts of the people.”


32 posted on 04/03/2014 9:29:42 AM PDT by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
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To: Lowell1775

Yes. Absolutely right. A large number of the Revolutionaries who actually FOUGHT were Scots-Irish.


33 posted on 04/03/2014 9:30:54 AM PDT by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
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To: kingattax

I thought it was mostly because we turned out to be bigger and meaner than the Japanese. :)


34 posted on 04/03/2014 10:01:25 AM PDT by Mr. Jeeves ([CTRL-GALT-DELETE])
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To: Sherman Logan

I agree. It was a unique blend of peoples, resources, distance, and geo-politics at the time that enabled us to to pull it all off.

In shorthand, I always describe the gentlemen Tidewater Anglican/Cavalier types (now Episcopalians) and Puritan/dissenters providing most of the money, respectability, leadership and intellect while the Calvinist/Knoxite Presbyterian/Congregationalists provided the much of the mob and muscle.

Would that diversity gave us such strength today.


35 posted on 04/03/2014 10:48:45 AM PDT by Lowell1775
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To: Lowell1775

Population of UK at the time around 12M, but about 4M of that was in Ireland, and most of that was hardly a group that made the country stronger. Most Irish (and Scotch-Irish) at the time were strongly anti-British, and for good reason.

Population of what became US, about 2.5M and growing very fast. A good chunk of whom were slaves.

Given the tech and logistics of the time, it was probably just not possible for UK to conquer US in 1770s, if Americans just refused to give up. They couldn’t support a large enough army to conquer and control territory of that size, particularly since America just didn’t have a single vulnerable point.

From another perspective, if we hadn’t broken away in 1776, either a successful revolution or something like Canada/Australia was inevitable sometime during the 19th century. The Brits just couldn’t continue to dominate a continent as its population and industry grew.

The Brits, after all, gave practical independence with little resistance to both Oz and Canada. But OTOH they learned a lesson the really hard way from George and the boys.


36 posted on 04/03/2014 12:49:20 PM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: MosesKnows
"When the law no longer protects you from the corrupt, but protects the corrupt from you"...

...Well said

....~\\\ I Wish I had said it ///~...

37 posted on 04/03/2014 8:21:09 PM PDT by virgil283 (When the sun spins, the cross appears, and the skies burn red)
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To: virgil283
I Wish I had said it

I also wish I could be that wise but that is a quote from Ayn Rand.

As is this quote :

The only power any government has is the power to crack down on criminals. Well, when there aren't enough criminals, one makes them. One declares so many things to be a crime that it becomes impossible for men to live without breaking laws. Ayn Rand

Long before Rand's observation, there was this quote.

"The more corrupt the state, the more numerous the laws." - Tacitus, Roman Senator and Historian (A.D. c.56 - c. 115) Tacitus (c. 56/57-ca. 125) was a Roman orator and historian. In a life that spanned the reigns of the Flavian emperors and of Trajan and Hadrian, he played a part in the public life of Rome and became its greatest historian.

Fortunately, for us, some people share their observations of events that others live. Quotations provide a viable way to weave their wisdom and observations into our everyday lives.

38 posted on 04/04/2014 5:57:13 AM PDT by MosesKnows (Love many, trust few, and always paddle your own canoe.)
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