Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Holy Land Farming Began 5,000 Years Earlier Than Thought
LiveScience ^ | March 19, 2013 | Douglas Main

Posted on 04/06/2014 8:00:14 PM PDT by SunkenCiv

For thousands of years, different groups of people have lived in the Negev desert, building stone walls and cities that survive to this day. But how did they make their living?

The current thinking is that these desert denizens didn't practice agriculture before approximately the first century, surviving instead by raising animals, said Hendrik Bruins, a landscape archaeologist at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev.

But new research suggests people in this area, the Negev highlands, practiced agriculture as long ago as 5000 B.C., Bruins told LiveScience. If true, the finding could change historians' views of the area's inhabitants, who lived in the region in biblical times and even before, he added.

A great surprise

Bruins' findings come from radiocarbon dating of bones and organic materials in various soil layers in an ancient field in southern Israel. He measured the ratio of carbon isotopes (atoms of the same element with a different number of neutrons), which changes as the radioactive carbon-14 isotope breaks down over time, while the stable carbon-12 does not. Within the soil, he found evidence of past cultivation, including animal manure and charred organic material (likely burnt kitchen scraps), both of which have been used as fertilizer around the world for millennia, he said.

(Excerpt) Read more at news.yahoo.com ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: agriculture; animalhusbandry; godsgravesglyphs; israel
By using walls to channelize and collect floodwaters, ancient farmers made the most of scant rainfall to grow crops in the desert. These techniques are still used today, like in this vineyard near Sede Boqer, Israel.

By using walls to channelize and collect floodwaters, ancient farmers made the most of scant rainfall to grow crops in the desert. These techniques are still used today, like in this vineyard near Sede Boqer, Israel.

1 posted on 04/06/2014 8:00:14 PM PDT by SunkenCiv
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

What a joke....5000 years??? Kinda tells me you’ve been guessing all along. Now...about all that carbon dating....


2 posted on 04/06/2014 8:02:55 PM PDT by Sacajaweau
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

3 posted on 04/06/2014 8:04:32 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: GraceG
Ping to you Grace.

There have been many advanced human civilizations. I think it is a mistake to assume we went in a single grade of development.

4 posted on 04/06/2014 8:04:53 PM PDT by KC_Lion (Build the America you want to live in at your address, and keep looking up.- Sarah Palin)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

bttt


5 posted on 04/06/2014 8:10:11 PM PDT by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

I can’t help it there is nothing wrong with the headline, but in my head I clearly hear the 60’s TV Robin saying “Holy Land Farming, Batman! Twisted I am.


6 posted on 04/06/2014 8:11:24 PM PDT by Mastador1 (I'll take a bad dog over a good politician any day!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Sacajaweau

7 posted on 04/06/2014 8:19:25 PM PDT by cuban leaf
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
But new research suggests people in this area, the Negev highlands, practiced agriculture as long ago as 5000 B.C., Bruins told LiveScience. A great surprise.

Heh, heh. Is it now?

8 posted on 04/06/2014 8:25:34 PM PDT by Texas Eagle (If it wasn't for double-standards, Liberals would have no standards at all -- Texas Eagle)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Sacajaweau

Your post tells me you don’t know what you’re talking about.


9 posted on 04/06/2014 8:37:19 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

I’ll believe it when they find some 7,000 year old overalls.


10 posted on 04/06/2014 8:47:21 PM PDT by smokingfrog ( sleep with one eye open (<o> ---)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Texas Eagle; blam

7000 years ago, IOW, the migration after the Black Sea flood.


11 posted on 04/06/2014 8:50:03 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

Well. Now we have a better idea when thought began.


12 posted on 04/06/2014 8:50:35 PM PDT by glock rocks (If you like your health plan, you're a racist !)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv; Sacajaweau; GraceG
5,000...

7000 years ago, IOW, the migration after the Black Sea flood.

something tells me if i ever have a chance at Grace...

13 posted on 04/06/2014 9:10:57 PM PDT by bigheadfred
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: bigheadfred
I suggest that if you want any kind of chance at with Grace, you try carbonara dating, rather than carbon dating.

Save the carbon for making footprints.

14 posted on 04/06/2014 9:31:09 PM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: smokingfrog

Oily hand prints on the front, or the deal is off. :)


15 posted on 04/06/2014 9:37:39 PM PDT by moose07 (the truth will out ,one day.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: smokingfrog

Not overalls but if they find some petrified Matzoh,it’s all over for the Palestinian claims that they were there first.

wouldn’t be surprised to find a “Moses was here” doodle on some clay tablet.

Now wouldn’t that be a kosher hoot?


16 posted on 04/06/2014 11:23:40 PM PDT by MadMax, the Grinning Reaper
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: MadMax, the Grinning Reaper

well, there kinda is a ‘Moses was here’ already isn’t there? Caleb’s puported tomb is in Timnath-serah (west bank) and it was this same Caleb, from Numbers 13:23, who went out as a spy for Moses, camped south of Israel, and found grapevines, with grapes so large it took two men to carry one bunch stretched between two staffs.

Grapes do grow wild, but to get a cluster so fruity that two men were needed to carry it? It’s hard to imagine something like that to not have been a result of careful cultivation by the ‘giants’ that Caleb and the other 11 spys saw.

not the same area as the article is talking about but Cain was also a farmer, Noah was a vitner, so horticultural skills were known from the beginning of the Bible.


17 posted on 04/07/2014 1:05:24 AM PDT by blueplum
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: bigheadfred

[ something tells me if i ever have a chance at Grace... ]

You are 3,000 years too late :)


18 posted on 04/07/2014 8:24:57 AM PDT by GraceG
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: KC_Lion

[ There have been many advanced human civilizations. I think it is a mistake to assume we went in a single grade of development. ]

There is all sorts of weird stuff in the era of antiquity...


19 posted on 04/07/2014 8:28:47 AM PDT by GraceG
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
But new research suggests people in this area, the Negev highlands, practiced agriculture as long ago as 5000 B.C., Bruins told LiveScience. If true, the finding could change historians' views of the area's inhabitants, who lived in the region in biblical times and even before, he added.

Does not surprise me. Here is what troubles me. Modern man punctuated into existence 70,000 to 240,000 ears ago depending upon whom you believe. 5000 years ago Man was still a stone age technologist. In that short amount of time he landed on the Moon. Yet, it took him 35 to 120 times longer to go from making spearheads to stone buildings without adding anything new to his anatomy.

This would only make sense if world human population remained too low for society to support clever inventive types. I think there is a lot of interesting stuff buried deeper than archeologists tend to dig that will eventually crop up and push advanced technology further back in time.

20 posted on 04/07/2014 10:44:28 AM PDT by LoneRangerMassachusetts (The meek shall not inherit the Earth)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: LoneRangerMassachusetts

That scenario doesn’t seem too likely, even if the lower figure of 70K (or as some would have it 40K) is accepted.

The problem is perhaps analogous to the search for exoplanets — when the first one was verified back in the 1990s, the technology was such that only very large bodies could be detected. Now nearly twenty years on bodies only 2 or 3 times Earth’s size can be detected.

With perishable materials, much less will survive over these huge intervals; woven material was used a very long time ago, but has only survived in the form of the imprints left on, say, clay. But the stone tools, arrowheads, etc, will be there for millions of years.

The oldest multirow (cultivated) barley sample AFAIK goes back to RC 14000 years ago, dug up in the Near East somewhere. It’s amazing that it survived, but it pushes back the verified age of agriculture. Postholes from structures rather like longhouses have been dated to 800K, and while it’s possible that a hunter-gatherer culture may have built shelters, the very nature of a moving food supply makes it unlikely that some form of agriculture was NOT being practiced there.

For much of the last 2 million years the oceans have been reduced in depth by glaciers on the highlands of the continents, and it’s perfectly likely that most of what we’d consider human prehistory left its traces on what is now the continental shelf.


21 posted on 04/07/2014 12:32:23 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Mastador1

Back then, the Batmobile was horse-drawn, and only had two wheels.


22 posted on 04/07/2014 12:44:09 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
Back then, the Batmobile was horse-drawn, and only had two wheels.

But tell me it still had those big bat wings on it.

23 posted on 04/07/2014 3:45:00 PM PDT by Mastador1 (I'll take a bad dog over a good politician any day!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

Ancient Nabatean winepress, present day vineyard. I like their priorities for that scarce rainwater.


24 posted on 04/07/2014 5:03:24 PM PDT by colorado tanker
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Mastador1

Two wings, but they grew out of an orb.


25 posted on 04/08/2014 4:59:48 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: colorado tanker

Wine was also used to clean up the water, and the water diluted the wine to avoid dehydration during the hot weather. :’) The Greeks did the same thing, in Homer there’s at least one scene where Odysseus is sitting at a table, mingling wine with water.


26 posted on 04/08/2014 5:01:41 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
IIRC, it was considered gauche among the Romans not to dilute their wine with water.

It's easy to forget that for most of human history urban water sources were dangerous. It was common to use alcohol or acid to mix with water to make it safer. Hence, the great popularity of tea and coffee. Also, it was common for people to drink beer over plain water until even into the 20th Century in the US and Northern Europe. Ahhh, for the old ways.

27 posted on 04/08/2014 10:09:21 AM PDT by colorado tanker
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: colorado tanker

Heh... those big bags of tea were lead-lined, that explains why my grandma and her siblings only lived into their 80s.


28 posted on 04/08/2014 10:18:33 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
"7000 years ago, IOW, the migration after the Black Sea flood."

Yup. I like it.

29 posted on 04/08/2014 11:27:08 AM PDT by blam
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
The oldest multirow (cultivated) barley sample AFAIK goes back to RC 14000 years ago, dug up in the Near East somewhere. It’s amazing that it survived, but it pushes back the verified age of agriculture. Postholes from structures rather like longhouses have been dated to 800K, and while it’s possible that a hunter-gatherer culture may have built shelters, the very nature of a moving food supply makes it unlikely that some form of agriculture was NOT being practiced there.

Afrocentrists have this "thing" about the early Egyptians being black Africans. Personally, I think that agriculturalists from much further north came down the eastern Mediterranean coast, found the very fertile Nile valley, and displaced any Africans who might have earlier been there. Egyptian civilization followed.

30 posted on 04/08/2014 11:34:47 AM PDT by PapaBear3625 (You don't notice it's a police state until the police come for you.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

31 posted on 04/08/2014 4:37:21 PM PDT by colorado tanker
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: colorado tanker

Maggie?


32 posted on 04/08/2014 4:56:49 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
Violet Crawley, Dowager Countess of Grantham.

(Well, yeah, its Maggie.)

33 posted on 04/08/2014 5:24:15 PM PDT by colorado tanker
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson