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Jersey City woman shares secret to longevity at 105th birthday party
Jersey Journal ^ | April 10, 2014

Posted on 04/12/2014 8:17:30 AM PDT by SMGFan

A Jersey City woman who will turn 105 years old on Sunday swears she's found the secret to longevity: dark chocolate and red wine.

(Excerpt) Read more at nj.com ...


TOPICS: Food; Health/Medicine
KEYWORDS: health
Great advice with Easter approaching.
1 posted on 04/12/2014 8:17:30 AM PDT by SMGFan
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To: SMGFan

It’s certainly worth trying! LOL


2 posted on 04/12/2014 8:23:57 AM PDT by MomofMarine
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To: SMGFan

She was a little mad during the interview. “Damn it,” she said, “I left my cigarettes at the bar again.”


3 posted on 04/12/2014 8:27:46 AM PDT by gunsequalfreedom (Conservative is not a label of convenience. It is a guide to your actions.)
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To: SMGFan
She worked until she was 92. I think that's the real secret.

I think it's sad that so many people want to retire at an early age. Never understood able bodied people who didn't like to work.

4 posted on 04/12/2014 8:29:00 AM PDT by SamAdams76
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To: SamAdams76

I’ve got a relation by marriage who retired and began hitting the bottle harder than ever. It’s not pretty.


5 posted on 04/12/2014 8:34:41 AM PDT by ProtectOurFreedom
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To: SMGFan

Cynical me was ready to think her longevity was based on a life peppered with government support, Social Security for decades and all that. Her story made me ashamed of what I initially thought.

Worked until 92, only then her job was gone because of Sept 11, 2001 where she worked in NYC. Self sufficient until a very few years ago until she broke her hip. Her whole story is a wonderful testament to hard work freedom, and those who have a real appreciation of it.


6 posted on 04/12/2014 8:48:29 AM PDT by Gaffer (Comprehensive Immigration Reform is just another name for Comprehensive Capitulation)
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To: SamAdams76

I retired 1 1/2 years ago from a very high stress job. Hubby had been retired for 7 yrs by then. Couple of reasons I retired early. Had set ourselves up so We didn’t need the money anymore and I wanted to enjoy life. Am doing that right now while I sit on our 40 ft sailboat and have breakfast and coffee waiting for what will be a beautiful day.
I have enjoyed every single day that I haven’t had to get up and go to work anymore.


7 posted on 04/12/2014 8:52:36 AM PDT by sheana
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To: ProtectOurFreedom
I've seen the same thing. I have close relative who retired young due to a "disability". He was able-bodied enough for most jobs and was offered a desk job by his employer but decided to collect SSI and sit at home instead. He proudly declared himself "retired" and he wasn't even 50 years old.

Slowly and surely, he began a speedy decline. Online gambling, pornography and drugs and liquor. He put on over 100 pounds. His wife left him and he lives in squalor, sitting in a darkened room with the TV constantly blaring. None of his friends come around anymore.

Many people have been brainwashed into looking forward to retirement and envision it as endless golf and pleasure. What they need to understand is that retirement signals the end of your useful life. Without wanting to sound too harsh about it, the only milestone after retirement is your death.

Having a job gives you something to live for. There is plenty of time for golf and vacation when you are working. In fact, you will have more money to do those things.

8 posted on 04/12/2014 8:53:28 AM PDT by SamAdams76
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To: sheana

Sounds like you didn’t like your job very much. That’s a shame too. Life is too short to do something you don’t like. Hopefully things work out well for your retirement but maybe you can find something low stress that you like doing.


9 posted on 04/12/2014 8:55:54 AM PDT by SamAdams76
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To: SamAdams76

If I wasn’t retired I couldn’t do the greatest job of my life in coaching HS baseball.


10 posted on 04/12/2014 8:56:24 AM PDT by onedoug
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To: onedoug

Exactly my point. You have a reason for getting up in the morning. When I say job, I’m not necessary talking about a 9 to 5 office gig. Coaching HS baseball is definitely a job.


11 posted on 04/12/2014 8:58:06 AM PDT by SamAdams76
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To: SamAdams76

My dad retired on disability in his early fifties. Never sleeps past 6:00am. Works his property, his garden and restores old tractors. He works more since his retirement than he did before as his job left him exhausted. He is the exception though. No alcohol or drugs though. He fixes lawn mowers for the whole neighborhood for free because he loves fixing stuff.


12 posted on 04/12/2014 8:58:15 AM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: Black Agnes
Sounds like your dad is working and not really retired at all!

That is good.

13 posted on 04/12/2014 8:59:45 AM PDT by SamAdams76
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To: SamAdams76

I loved my job! I worked for myself. I don’t want to work anymore. Would rather spend time on our boat either docked or sailing. Come and go as I please. Pretty simple.


14 posted on 04/12/2014 8:59:55 AM PDT by sheana
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To: SMGFan

God bless her.


15 posted on 04/12/2014 9:01:10 AM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: SamAdams76

He thought, for a while, about opening a fixit shop. But decided it was more ‘fun’ if he didn’t HAVE to do it every day. BTW, his disability was NOT govt disability. And he and mom saved 99c of every $ he made when he was working so they’re not on any FSA checks right now. It’s a good thing they were so frugal. I could tell stories about their frugality. I’ll give you one though. When he had his massive MI and very nearly died (heart surgeon told him if he’d EVER smoked he’d have died from it, dad was too cheap to spend $$ on cigs) the emergency staff cut his clothes off when he came in. One of his favorite sets of work coveralls too. He made them SAVE the little strips of fabric in a bag and when I came to visit him he asked if I could sew them back together for him. LOL.


16 posted on 04/12/2014 9:04:48 AM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: Black Agnes

Good for your dad that he was able to stay active, regardless of his disability. Staying busy definitely has its merits.


17 posted on 04/12/2014 9:07:58 AM PDT by Jane Long (While Marxists continue the fundamental transformation of the USA, progressive RINOs assist!)
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To: Black Agnes

If you’ll pardon my pointing it out, it doesn’t sound as if your father is particularly disabled.


18 posted on 04/12/2014 9:08:36 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: SMGFan

Her internal beauty shines through. What an amazing lady. May God continue to bless her!


19 posted on 04/12/2014 9:12:27 AM PDT by Jane Long (While Marxists continue the fundamental transformation of the USA, progressive RINOs assist!)
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To: SMGFan

My late mom’s cousin is 106 and never touched wine. Guess she has eaten chocolate over the years. My mom died in January, 2007 and would have been 103 in April of that year. She sure never touched wine. Many of my ancestors lived until they were in their 90’s even those born in the early 1800’s..


20 posted on 04/12/2014 9:16:45 AM PDT by MamaB
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To: Gaffer

+1


21 posted on 04/12/2014 9:18:01 AM PDT by Traveler59 ( Truth is a journey, not a destination.)
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To: 9YearLurker

He’s not able to do his former job. Actually he wanted to. OSHA forbid his presence in the workplace with his heart condition. The company insurance forbid his working that job as well (liability). His company (where he got his disability) didn’t have any other jobs they could offer him (wanted to offer him at his age) and just wrote him off to disability. It was cheaper for them to do that than fight a wrongful dismissal suit or pay the extra liability the insurance company wanted.

Liability and health insurance were prohibitive when he looked into opening a fix-it business on his own. And OSHA wouldn’t have permitted HIM to be on the premises doing work with his heart condition at that time.

30+ years ago (he’s ~80 now) there weren’t the same level of medical interventions in heart disease there are now. He had his massive MI right before the introduction of the clot buster drugs. He’s still prohibited from lifting anything more than 20lbs or walking up more than 1 flight of stairs in a certain amount of time. He’s got all sorts of ‘assistance’ equipment in his shop to help him. All the lifting and supporting stuff. He’s got kids and kin who help him move heavy stuff if he has to. He’s not on a schedule with anything so waiting several days isn’t a big deal. Since clotbuster drugs there are very few people with his kind of heart damage anymore. And most of the ones that had that sort of damage are dead now.


22 posted on 04/12/2014 9:18:30 AM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: SMGFan
her husband, Leo Mospak, was killed by Russian soldiers in Estonia during World War II.

Estonian Legion perhaps?

23 posted on 04/12/2014 9:25:36 AM PDT by InABunkerUnderSF (Hey CNN, where's the wall to wall Leland Yee coverage?)
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To: SMGFan

Every day now I have my heart medicine...dark chocolate. A while ago I told my wife I had my heart medicine, and she gave me this puzzled look. “Heart medicine...what heart medicine?” I told her dark chocolate, and she gave me that you’re-an-idiot look. I just laughed. But dark chocolate is good for the heart.


24 posted on 04/12/2014 9:27:18 AM PDT by driftless2
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To: Black Agnes

Thanks for the detailed answer.

I generally don’t think taxpayers should be paying liability for someone whose health would support their doing a desk job of some type—but private disability insurance, of course, is something completely different.

I’m glad his ticker held up for so long.


25 posted on 04/12/2014 9:29:01 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: sheana

I’m considering retiring on a sailboat and am trying to learn all I can about it.

Would you be willing to share more info about your sailboat and lifestyle decisions?

If so, please PM me...?


26 posted on 04/12/2014 9:38:20 AM PDT by MV=PY (The Magic Question: Who's paying for it?)
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To: SMGFan

Hmmmm....if that’s true....I should live forever!


27 posted on 04/12/2014 9:39:37 AM PDT by goodnesswins (R.I.P. Doherty, Smith, Stevens, Woods.)
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To: SamAdams76

I agree with you...WORK also does a body good!


28 posted on 04/12/2014 9:40:15 AM PDT by goodnesswins (R.I.P. Doherty, Smith, Stevens, Woods.)
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To: 9YearLurker

My dad was the oldest child of an alcoholic sharecropper and a teenage mom w/o high school diploma. He and his next youngest brother had to do most of the sharecropping AND do their regular chores AND attend school while he was growing up. He left home at 16, in the 10th grade, to help his mom put food on the table for his 5 younger siblings when his dad finally just left them. This was prior to any sort of welfare or food stamp program. He worked in a dangerous and stressful job for 35 years until he had the massive heart attack that very nearly killed him. He’s told me and my brother that if he left us $1 it would be $1 more than anyone ever left him.

His company gave him disability to buy his silence against a wrongful dismissal. Fact is, he wasn’t qualified for any of their desk jobs by then. He didn’t even have a high school diploma or even GED. There simply wasn’t a desk job they could have given him that didn’t involve stress that would have called down the insurance company/OSHA gods wrath.

This is less about goldbricking and more about government regulation and lawyers inhibiting someone who could have very easily started his own business. He did the numbers wrt starting his own fixit business, and assuming he could have doctor shopped to get approval for it, would have had to work 10-12hrs a day just to essentially break even after all the insurance payments for his heart condition. His former profession was off limits as per OSHA.

He wasn’t terribly happy to be on disability. It being a sign of shame for his generation. I think that stigma is why he stays so busy. He’s afraid someone will think he’s goldbricking.


29 posted on 04/12/2014 9:44:54 AM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: Black Agnes

I hope I conveyed well enough my understanding of his situation. Our understanding of an economically deprived childhood has come a long way in the last couple of generations. Fortunately, the bar has been raised.


30 posted on 04/12/2014 9:57:39 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: 9YearLurker

My dad’s upbringing is why he insisted my brother and I get college degrees. Kid brother does what daddy used to, jobwise. We are much more mindful and attentive to stress related health issues though now. And kid brother at least has a college degree to fall back on.

I think it was the stressful job and the stressful childhood that contributed to daddy’s heart condition. NONE of the relatives on either side of his family tree had any sort of heart condition prior to mid 70’s. His dad’s side never had heart conditions. They all died in their mid/late 90’s. A few of them topped out in the 105yrs range. Dad completely changed his lifestyle though. He doesn’t eat enough to ever be completely full, drinks one cup of coffee/day, never smoked. He eats mostly veggies and scrambled eggs in the summertime. The veg from his own garden. He likes to brag ‘grew everything on this plate’ when he eats. When he’s not puttering around some little old lady’s malfunctioning lawn mower he’s on the phone with his younger siblings ‘running their business’. He’s always been the replacement dad in that family. The younger ones don’t remember a time when it wasn’t daddy’s paycheck that bought the food and even the shoes they wore to school.


31 posted on 04/12/2014 10:10:13 AM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: Black Agnes

Sounds like he’s never stopped contributing.

Nice story. My father is 89 and still going strong (after a little heart surgery himself.)


32 posted on 04/12/2014 10:13:06 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: 9YearLurker

He had more heart surgery last year to repair a damaged valve (beware long term warfarin use!). He’s been clearing brush at the back of their property for the past week now. His only complaint right now is his knees. Given his age, he’s OK with that considering all the things that could be wrong.

I’ve got several trays of veggies started for him too. We’re just waiting for it to get warm enough to set them out now. I grow the heirlooms he likes and has trouble finding already started at the big box stores. He prefers to grow the ones his mama grew. Can’t blame him.

IIRC he’s not on any meds now either. Not even BP meds. His BP is always excellent. He was on the warfarin and statins ‘prophylactically’ given his condition and age. He’s off the warfarin now, just takes aspirin and got off the statins when he read a little more about them. His cholesterol is fine as well. Always was in fact. He was on the statins because of other ‘risk factors’ (previous heart attack). His heart attack wasn’t because of high cholesterol even. He was 100% blocked in a couple places but his cholesterol was 180 when they checked it with 30yr old technology.


33 posted on 04/12/2014 10:31:35 AM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: SMGFan

I’m saved!


34 posted on 04/12/2014 11:02:51 AM PDT by Lorianne (fedgov, taxporkmoney)
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To: SamAdams76
What they need to understand is that retirement signals the end of your useful life. Without wanting to sound too harsh about it, the only milestone after retirement is your death.Wow. I hope that you change your mind. Many retired folks throw themselves into volunteer work, contribute to projects much larger than their personal sustenance, and make things happen. Retirement doesn't render a person useless. Attitude or outlook on life is what makes a person vibrant. Or not.
35 posted on 04/12/2014 7:48:29 PM PDT by SisterK (behold a pale horse)
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To: sheana
I have enjoyed every single day that I haven’t had to get up and go to work anymore.

That makes two of us. I retired in 1999 at age 54 and have never regretted it - not once!

36 posted on 04/12/2014 8:56:51 PM PDT by Graybeard58 (God is not the author of confusion. 1 Cor 13: 33)
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To: SisterK
Again, you have the wrong interpretation of "retired" because what you describe in your post is not retirement.
37 posted on 04/13/2014 8:17:59 AM PDT by SamAdams76
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To: SamAdams76

exxxxxxxcuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuse me


38 posted on 04/13/2014 11:20:00 AM PDT by SisterK (behold a pale horse)
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To: SisterK

I miss Steve Martin. In his prime, he was the best comedian on the planet.


39 posted on 04/13/2014 11:28:05 AM PDT by SamAdams76
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To: sheana

You go! I’m jealous. :D


40 posted on 04/13/2014 12:03:50 PM PDT by Mama Shawna
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