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Remnants of Sailendra dynasty allegedly found
Jakarta Post ^ | Wednesday, April 09, 2014 | Ainur Rohmah

Posted on 04/12/2014 12:40:22 PM PDT by SunkenCiv

The National Archeological Excavation Center has found more evidence of the existence of the Sailendra civilization, believed to have prospered during the 7th century in Ngreco hamlet, Kesongo village, Tuntang district, Semarang regency, Central Java.

Previously, a team found pieces of bricks, artifacts and a jaladwara waterway segment, while recently it discovered a foundation believed to have been used for a temple structure.

A jaladwara was a water sewage system commonly found in bath houses during ancient times. The tip of the jaladwara is usually the shape of a dragon’s head.

The finding is strengthened by the discovery of soil that is harder than that in other locations... [during] an excavation in Ngreco hamlet for the past week to trace the remnants of the Buddhist Sailendra dynasty...

According to Indrajaya, the findings in Tuntang district are part of efforts to gather knowledge on culture during the Sailendra kingdom era.

...the discovery of the jaladwara in Ngreco hamlet suggested the presence of a waterway...

The Sailendra dynasty was founded in 752 AD by King Bhanu with the influence of the Buddha Mahayana. One of its greatest legacies is the Borobudur temple complex in Magelang.

The dynasty was successful in expanding its territory to Cambodia, but it collapsed in 850 AD.

(Excerpt) Read more at thejakartapost.com ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: borobudur; centraljava; godsgravesglyphs; indonesia; kesongovillage; ngrecohamlet; sailendradynasty; semarangregency; tuntangdistrict
The bas relief of 8th century Borobudur depicted the palace scene of King and Queen accompanied by their subjects. Its strongly suggested that the relief depicted the actual scene of Sailendran royal court. [Gunawan Kartapranata]

The bas relief of 8th century Borobudur depicted the palace scene of King and Queen accompanied by their subjects. Its strongly suggested that the relief depicted the actual scene of Sailendran royal court. [Gunawan Kartapranata]

1 posted on 04/12/2014 12:40:22 PM PDT by SunkenCiv
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To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...
The photo is just related (from wikipedia), it isn't part of these new finds. I'm just glad these are in Indonesia and not Afghanistan.

2 posted on 04/12/2014 12:41:51 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv
I thought the Sailendra went out of business when their solar products didn't catch on in world markets...

(I would translate their writings but I never learned Java script...)

3 posted on 04/12/2014 12:45:30 PM PDT by chajin ("There is no other name under heaven given among people by which we must be saved." Acts 4:12)
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To: chajin

*snicker*

Well done!


4 posted on 04/12/2014 12:49:12 PM PDT by Tax-chick (Entropy is high. Wear a hat!)
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To: Tax-chick

I seriously am fascinated by ancient archaeology, but sometimes I can’t stop yielding to the ba-dump-BUMP temptation. There was an incredible civilization in SE Asia that has been unknown to the west because it wasn’t in the Christian-Muslim-Silkroad axis that fills most of our history books—deservedly so, but not at the expense of the rest of the world.


5 posted on 04/12/2014 12:53:25 PM PDT by chajin ("There is no other name under heaven given among people by which we must be saved." Acts 4:12)
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To: chajin

I like cool old stuff, too. I often read about ancient civilizations, such as this one, about which I know absolutely nothing.


6 posted on 04/12/2014 12:55:28 PM PDT by Tax-chick (Entropy is high. Wear a hat!)
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To: chajin

Actually, the Sailendrans were early pioneers of wind power, particularly in transitioning from oars as the primary means of naval vessel propulsion .....


7 posted on 04/12/2014 1:11:51 PM PDT by mikrofon (Sail away, sail away, sail away…)
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To: SunkenCiv

One of the most interesting aspects of the archaeology is the concentration of wealth. Much of what we have of ancient civs is the remnant the wealthy minority left us. The story of history to date is one in which wealth becomes more and more generalized.

How many Americans would trade their current lifestyle for the lifestyle of any historical king up to the early 20th century?


8 posted on 04/12/2014 1:18:44 PM PDT by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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To: SunkenCiv

A.D. 752 to 850 is not “ancient” but medieval in European terms. The first Carolingian king of the Franks, Pippin the Short, became king in 751. The Abbasid dynasty of caliphs took over in 750.


9 posted on 04/12/2014 1:23:47 PM PDT by Verginius Rufus (ADES)
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To: mikrofon
Actually, the Sailendrans were early pioneers of wind power, particularly in transitioning from oars as the primary means of naval vessel propulsion .....

That was because they were frugal and would only buy vessels that were on sail...

10 posted on 04/12/2014 1:26:32 PM PDT by chajin ("There is no other name under heaven given among people by which we must be saved." Acts 4:12)
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To: Verginius Rufus
A.D. 752 to 850 is not “ancient” but medieval in European terms.

OTOH, what passes for the "middle ages" in China (Southern Song, perhaps Yuan dynasties) and Japan (Kamakura-jidai) doesn't begin until the 1100s, and the SE Asian civilization of the 800s, and even into the 1100s in modern-day Cambodia and Thailand, would be "ancient" by European standards, emulating more the Greco-Roman than the Carolingian-Byzantine era.

11 posted on 04/12/2014 1:30:22 PM PDT by chajin ("There is no other name under heaven given among people by which we must be saved." Acts 4:12)
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To: chajin

Sailendrans is achemadically correct but in the venacular, they are known as sailors


12 posted on 04/12/2014 1:34:17 PM PDT by bert ((K.E. N.P. N.C. +12 ..... History is a process, not an event)
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To: 1010RD
How many Americans would trade their current lifestyle for the lifestyle of any historical king up to the early 20th century?

Not me. Give me flush toilets ... and antibiotics, anesthesia, and air conditioning.

However, I don't understand why I can't have those things and also have cool clothes.

13 posted on 04/12/2014 1:39:25 PM PDT by Tax-chick (Entropy is high. Wear a hat!)
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To: Tax-chick

It’s the 21st century, baby. Live it up!

http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_trksid=m570.l3201&_nkw=vintage+clothing&_sacat=0


14 posted on 04/12/2014 2:01:50 PM PDT by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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To: 1010RD

I plan to stop caring what people think about my clothes when I turn 50. My children can divide their lives into the eras of “Before Mama went bats” and “After Mama went bats.”


15 posted on 04/12/2014 2:03:44 PM PDT by Tax-chick (Entropy is high. Wear a hat!)
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To: Tax-chick

What I really wanted to share with you was a gal who designs and sews her own era specific clothes, but I couldn’t find it. She ran the gamut from Regency to Medieval.

I liked a lot of her stuff. I’m not a fan of most modern clothing. It’s not made for women, but for women-haters. It is rarely complimentary and mostly slutty. I think women’s fashion entered a cyclical depression starting with the tube top and we won’t be out of it until normal women take back the fashion industry.

I’ve seen hundreds of prom dresses and, even for the youngest most beautiful bodies, they’re unflattering. Showing less is more. I’m hoping that we’ve hit the nadir for women’s fashion and that things are beginning to look up, then a new “fashion” takes hold that just “uglifies” womanhood. Good luck with your fashion change. Do you sew your own clothes?


16 posted on 04/12/2014 10:09:38 PM PDT by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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To: 1010RD

No, I don’t sew much. I can successfully make one skirt pattern and one jumper pattern, but it’s hard to get two hours uninterrupted even to make the skirt. Mostly I shop at The Salvation Army.

There’s a whole world of beautiful outfits, from different countries and eras, including styles that will flatter even a very stout figure, but it seems as if many women consumers are simply blind. With what is currently for sale, at best a lady can look tidy and dignified, and perhaps find a flattering color, but there isn’t much that’s really gorgeous, even in formal gowns, as you observed.


17 posted on 04/13/2014 3:57:06 AM PDT by Tax-chick (Entropy is high. Wear a hat!)
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To: Tax-chick

Resale shopping is the way to go. I’m often surprised that more people don’t do it. The prices are low and the quality is high. If you’re willing to shop retail, resale is a winner all around.


18 posted on 04/14/2014 1:08:58 AM PDT by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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