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America’s Fastest Shrinking Cities
Wall Street 24X7 ^ | 04/15/2014 | by Vince Calio

Posted on 04/15/2014 12:53:40 PM PDT by SeekAndFind

The U.S. population rose by just 0.72% in 2013, the lowest growth rate in more than 70 years. Not only has the country become less-attractive to immigrants than in years past, with net immigration down from nearly 1.2 million as of 2001 to 843,145 last year, but also the U.S.’s domestic birth rate has dropped to a multi-decade low.

While the population of most of the country’s metro areas grew at a low pace in recent years, in a small number of metro areas the population actually shrank. Looking at the most recent years, the U.S. population rose by just 2.4% between April 2010 and July 2013, but in 30 metro areas the population shrank by at least 1%. The population in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, fell a nation-leading 4.4% in that time. Based on recently released U.S. Census Bureau estimates, 24/7 Wall St. examined the cities with shrinking populations.

Most of the metro areas with the largest declines in populations have been shrinking for decades.The total population of Cambria County, Pennsylvania — which makes up the Johnstown metro area — has fallen 34% between 1940 and 2013. Allegany County, Maryland — the central county of the Cumberland, Maryland metro area — peaked in population during the 1950 Census. The county’s population has since fallen by 18%, according to the Census Bureau’s 2013 population estimates.

In many of these areas, long-term drops in manufacturing jobs are tied to specific industries. The Youngstown, Ohio; Weirton, West Virginia; and Johnstown, Pennsylvania metro areas were all once home to major employers in the steel industry. Each of these areas lost many of the jobs these businesses once supported. Similarly, automotive factory closures have hurt the Saginaw, Michigan and Mansfield, Ohio metro areas.

Kenneth M. Johnson, senior demographer at the Carsey Institute at the University of New Hampshire, told 24/7 Wall St. that industry declines and job losses can lead to population declines. “It’s entirely plausible that the loss of jobs in a specific industry sector could be be the driving force in that kind of decline,” he said.

Of course, manufacturing jobs have declined nearly 30% in the U.S. between 2001 and 2013. However, in eight of the areas with shrinking populations, the number of jobs in the manufacturing sector fell by more than the nationwide decline, according to figures produced by Economic Modeling Specialists Intl. (EMSI). Flint, Michigan, lost the most jobs in the sector as manufacturing employment declined 57% from 2001 to 2013.

In general, these areas suffered from weak job markets overall. In Pine Bluff, the metro area with the single greatest loss of residents, the unemployment rate at the end of last year was more than 10%, among the highest in the country. Similarly, Flint, Saginaw, and Carson City, Nevada, all had unemployment rates of at least 9% in December 2013, well above the national rate of 6.7%

According to Johnson, young people leaving the area in order to look for work have driven the population decline for many industrial metro areas in the Midwest. “As a result, you would lose not only the young adults themselves but, over time, the children they would have produced.”

The loss in younger residents has also lead to a higher median age in these areas. “You would have a higher death-to-birth ratio because there aren’t as many births, but also because an aging population has higher mortality risk,” said Johnson. In 2012, six of the metro areas with the largest declines had populations with a median age of at least 40 years, older than the national median age of 37.4. A typical Johnstown resident was 44 years old.

While most of these areas had long-term, steady declines in population, the decline in Carson City and Farmington was more recent. Since 1940, San Juan County, New Mexico, the central county in Farmington, and Carson City, Nevada have grown 639% and 1,585%, respectively.

“I think its important to make a distinction between these shorter-term population trends in the 2010 to 2013 period and these longer-term trends that have hurt these older, industrial areas in the Midwest,” noted Johnson.

Based on recent U.S. Census Bureau estimates, 24/7 Wall St. examined changes in population for 381 metropolitan statistical areas from April 2010 through July 2013. We also considered figures from the Census Bureau’s 2012 American Community Survey. We reviewed population figures from each decennial Census since 1940, using each area’s largest county as a proxy for the metro area. Data on incomes and price levels, current as of 2012 and 2011, respectively, are from the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA). Figures on home price changes are from the Federal Housing Finance Agency’s (FHFA) House Price Index and are current as of the end of 2013. Seasonally adjusted unemployment rates for December of each year from 2010 to 2013 are from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Estimates for gross metropolitan product are from IHS Global Insight. EMSI data on changes in total jobs, as well as manufacturing and construction jobs, between 2001 and 2013 were also considered.

These are America’s shrinking cities.

10. Saginaw, Mich.
> Net population change, 2010 to 2013: -1.81% (tied, 10th highest)
> Population change from peak (1980): -13.8%
> Unemployment: 9.0% (42nd highest)
> GMP change, 2013: -1.2% (25th lowest)

The Saginaw metro area’s population fell by 1.8% between 2010 and 2013, largely due to people leaving the area. A net total of 4,393 people moved out of the area during those years. The area’s auto manufacturing sector and supporting industries have shrank in recent decades. A number of General Motors factories in the county have closed down over the years with only one remaining today, Saginaw Metal Casting Operations. While manufacturing employment has recovered slightly in recent years, Saginaw’s unemployment rate of 9% at the end of last year was still well above the national rate of 6.7%. Incomes were also quite low in the area, where per capita personal income was slightly more than $33,000 in 2012, versus more than $45,000 nationwide.

9. Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Penn.
> Net population change, 2010 to 2013: -1.81% (tied, 10th highest)
> Population change from peak (1970): -22.9%
> Unemployment: 8.1% (tied-75th highest)
> GMP change, 2013: -0.4% (tied, 57th lowest)

Mahoning County, Ohio, the largest in the Youngstown metro area, lost 23% of its population since its peak in 1970. The metro area’s population was decimated when a major source of jobs, the steel industry, began to get leaner and shut down factories in the 1970s and 1980s. Sections of the city became so sparsely populated over the past three decades that, in 2002, the administration revealed a plan to move residents from low-population areas to other neighborhoods within the city — although many residents were unwilling to move. Jobs in manufacturing have continued to diminish in recent years as well, falling by 37% between 2001 and 2013 — although manufacturing continued to account for an outsized portion of all jobs. Recently, the area’s economy has struggled, with GMP shrinking by 0.4% last year, even as the U.S. economy grew 1.9%.

8. Weirton-Steubenville, W. Va.-Ohio
> Net population change, 2010 to 2013: -1.98%
> Population change from peak (1960): -31.5%
> Unemployment: 8.9% (45th highest)
> GMP change, 2013: -2.6% (5th lowest)

From 1960 to 2013, the population in Jefferson County, Ohio, the largest county in the Weirton metro area, declined by 31.5%. Like many of the fastest shrinking areas in the U.S., the Weirton metro area’s population once relied on the U.S. steel industry for jobs. In 2007, Weirton Steel Corp. plant was closed, ending the production of steel at a company that had once been a major part of the city’s identity. In 2012, 19% of the area’s population were senior citizens, and the median age was 43.8 years old, making the area one of the oldest in the U.S. From 2010 to 2013, the area lost nearly 2% of its population, largely due to natural factors, as deaths outnumbered births by more than 1,800.

7. Cumberland, Md.-W. Va.
> Net population change, 2010 to 2013: -2.0%
> Population change from peak (1950):-17.9%
> Unemployment: 7.1% (141st lowest)
> GMP change, 2013: +0.5% (141st lowest)

Factories run by Pittsburgh Plate Glass (PPG), Allegany Munitions and Kelly Springfield Tire once employed many Cumberland area residents. While PPG is still a Fortune 500 company, it ceased manufacturing in Cumberland in 1981, and the Kelly Springfield Tire plant closed in 1987. Allegany Munitions, now called Alliant Technologies, still employed more than 1,400 people in the area as of 2012. Not surprisingly, a weak economy may contribute to the area’s population decline. The area’s GMP grew by only an estimated 0.5% in 2013, well below the 1.9% national GDP growth. Cumberland city officials have initiated a plan to construct multi-family housing as an attempt to reverse the decline. The plan includes upgrades to the city’s infrastructure, including schools and roads.

6. Carson City, Nev.
> Net population change, 2010 to 2013: -2.16%
> Population change from peak (2000): +3.1%
> Unemployment: 9.5% (28th highest)
> GMP change, 2013: -1.3% (22nd lowest)

The Carson City metro area experienced considerable outward migration between 2010 and 2013. In that time, nearly 1,000 residents left the area, which had a population of slightly more than 54,000 last year. Natural population growth was also negative, as deaths outnumbered births in every year from 2010 onward. The significant population decline was likely due in part to the area’s poor economy. The area’s unemployment rate was among the worst in the country, at 9.5%, as was the decline in home prices over the five years prior to the end of 2013. Also, personal income barely grew between 2010 and 2012, rising just 2.2% a year, among the lowest growth rates in the nation.Still, people may return to the area if the economy improves. An October 2013 report by the Nevada State Demographer’s Office projects that Carson City’s population will begin growing in the future.

5. Mansfield, Ohio
> Net population change, 2010 to 2013: -2.17%
> Population change from peak (1980): -7.2%
> Unemployment: 8.1% (tied-75th highest)
> GMP change, 2013: -0.4% (tied-57th lowest)

Mansfield was hit hard by the bankruptcy of General Motors in 2009 when GM closed its plant in the area. The plant was the area’s biggest employer at the time with more than 400 workers. Nearly 3,000 more people moved out of the area than people moved in between 2010 and 2013, one of the largest outward migrations in the country over that time frame. The area’s unemployment rate was 8.1% in December 2013, higher than the U.S. unemployment rate of 6.7%. Mansfield’s economy shrank by 0.4% in 2013, even as national output grew by 1.9%. The area’s poor economy and the city’s inability to generate sufficient funds from taxes, led the Mansfield city school district to declare a state of fiscal emergency in December.

4. Johnstown, Penn.
> Net population change, 2010 to 2013: -2.21%
> Population change from peak (1940): -34.2%
> Unemployment: 8.1% (tied-75th highest)
> GMP change, 2013: -1.1% (29th lowest)

A falling population is hardly a new trend in the Johnstown area, which consists of Pennsylvania’s Cambria County. Since 1940, when the county’s population topped 213,000 people, the number of residents in Cambria County has dropped in every decade. Johnstown’s population fell from 143,677 in 2010 to less than 140,500 last year. A portion of this was attributable to migration, as net 1,600 residents moved out of the area during that time. As of 2012, Johnstown’s population was among the nation’s oldest, with a median age of 44.1, while more than 19% of the population were senior citizens, among the highest in the U.S. The area was once a major steel maker, and before that it was a major source of coal. Bethlehem Steel alone accounted for more than 11,000 jobs in the area during the 1970s, according to the Johnstown Area Heritage Association. The Fortune 500 company, which no longer exists, permanently closed its Johnstown plant in 1992.

3. Flint, Mich.
> Net population change, 2010 to 2013: -2.45%
> Population change from peak (1980): -7.8%
> Unemployment: 9.8% (25th highest)
> GMP change, 2013: +1.4% (135th highest)

Flint — known for its manufacturing industry — is still feeling the effects of General Motor’s 2009 bankruptcy. While the company was rescued by the government, numerous, less profitable GM facilities were still liquidated, many of which were located in Flint. Nearly 10% of the workforce was unemployed as of December 2013, among the worst rates in the nation. The poor work climate may be contributing to the city’s exodus. Flint’s population was 415,376 last year, down 2.45% from April 2010, most of which can be explained by migration. Much of this decline occurred between mid 2011 and mid 2012, when the city’s population dropped by nearly 4,000, the largest nominal decline nationwide over that time.

2. Farmington, N.M.
> Net population change, 2010 to 2013: -2.72%
> Population change from peak (2010): -2.8%
> Unemployment: 6.4% (163rd lowest)
> GMP change, 2013: -1.4% (18th lowest)

While most metro areas with declining populations have been shrinking for a while, Farmington’s population was actually growing until recently. Nearly 7,000 more people moved out of Farmington than moved in between 2010 and 2013, among the highest outward migrations in the nation over that period. While the area’s 6.4% unemployment rate at the end of 2013 was below the U.S. unemployment rate, the area’s per capita personal income was $33,092 in 2012, among the lowest in the country. The area’s economy has also contracted for two consecutive years, shrinking 2.2% in 2012 and 1.4% in 2013 — both among the largest drops in the nation. However, the area is experiencing a spike in oil investment. This could provide a boost to the Farmington economy and lure people to the area.

1. Pine Bluff, Ark.
> Net population change, 2010 to 2013: -4.43%
> Population change from peak (1980): -19.3%
> Unemployment: 10.2% (21st highest)
> GMP change, 2013: -1.7% (17th lowest)

Pine Bluff’s population fell by more than 4.4% between 2010 and 2013, or by more than 1,000 people per year in each of the last three years.Most of this decline can be attributed to outward migration. Nearly 5,000 people left the area in that time, as Pine Bluff’s population fell from just over 100,000 to less than 96,000. County officials remain unsure about what has caused the drop in population, although high crime rates are believed to be one possibility. Another contributing factor may be the lack of good area jobs — Pine Bluff’s unemployment rate topped 10% at the end of last year, among the highest rates of any metro area. Despite substantial recent gains, per capita personal income in Pine Bluff was just $32,776 in 2012, among the lower incomes in the country and well below the per capita national income of $45,188. The area’s economy has also been struggling, shrinking 1.7% last year, among the largest declines in the country.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Society
KEYWORDS: cities; decline; population

1 posted on 04/15/2014 12:53:40 PM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind
with net immigration down from nearly 1.2 million as of 2001 to 843,145 last year

Legal, illegal, or both combined?

2 posted on 04/15/2014 12:55:56 PM PDT by Yo-Yo (Is the /sarc tag really necessary?)
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To: SeekAndFind

Wow 6 of the 10 cities are either in Michigan or Ohio (or border them ... Penn. for example). Depressing. I live near Toledo and you get the sense this area is NEVER going to recover.


3 posted on 04/15/2014 12:59:01 PM PDT by library user
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To: library user
I live near Toledo and you get the sense this area is NEVER going to recover.

Those who rule us don't ever want that recovery to occur. That would mean prosperity.. jobs.. hope.. those are anathema to those who want the country's populace on its knees begging for scraps from the government.

4 posted on 04/15/2014 1:02:43 PM PDT by ScottinVA (Obama is so far in over his head, even his ears are beneath the water level.)
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To: SeekAndFind

Someone define “city”....those all seem like large TOWNS to me.


5 posted on 04/15/2014 1:03:23 PM PDT by SoFloFreeper
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To: SeekAndFind

how many are democrat strongholds?

how many did not make the list (Detroit) because they are already dead?


6 posted on 04/15/2014 1:04:50 PM PDT by longtermmemmory (VOTE! http://www.senate.gov and http://www.house.gov)
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To: library user

Things must be bad in Michigan and Ohio. Even the illegals and the dead beats don’t want to go there.


7 posted on 04/15/2014 1:06:44 PM PDT by forgotten man
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To: SeekAndFind

Johnstown, PA hitched their wagon to the corrupt John Murtha after the steel industry went down. For thirty years they relied on him bringing home government pork to keep the town employed.

Eventually he went the way of all flesh. And the jobs he extorted moved on to the next corrupt Congressman to chair that committee.

It will be a ghost town within a decade or so.


8 posted on 04/15/2014 1:08:24 PM PDT by Buckeye McFrog
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To: SeekAndFind

As they said in Michigan during the Carter recession: Last one out of Michigan turn off the lights.


9 posted on 04/15/2014 1:09:34 PM PDT by lurk
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To: forgotten man

“Things must be bad in Michigan and Ohio. Even the illegals and the dead beats don’t want to go there.”

There are plenty of them here in the Cleveland Dakron area!


10 posted on 04/15/2014 1:09:45 PM PDT by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ( Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end!)
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To: forgotten man

Who in the world would want to live in those miserable places. Run by a bunch of corrupt democrats who have run those midwestern states into the dirt.


11 posted on 04/15/2014 1:09:49 PM PDT by turducken
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To: Yo-Yo
with net immigration down from nearly 1.2 million as of 2001 to 843,145 last year.

that's just legal immigration:

I hope that is true

If true it's the best news I've heard in a long time

we don't need any more immigrants when we have 330 million people in the USA and lowest workforce participation

go home you 3rd world socialists or stay home!

of course illegals are probably up so that's not good. but at least all support me on here against illegals. i am against any immigration from the 3rd world

12 posted on 04/15/2014 1:17:52 PM PDT by Democrat_media (Obama ordered IRS to rig 2012 election and must resign)
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To: SeekAndFind

I have personal knowledge of the Cumberland, Maryland area. I went to college in that area. I also worked in the state department of planning in Cumberland for a time while in school.

When I was there, in the mid 1970s, it was an economically depressed area. People talked about the cutbacks and closures of major manufacturing such as Kelly Springfield Tires, Celanese Fortrel, and PPG. Population was declining. Coal mining exists in that part of Maryland, and it too was declining at that time.

It is striking to me that, at least in the case of Cumberland, from this list, the area was known to be economically disadvantaged decades ago. It strikes me how difficult it can be to turn things around. Civic leaders at that time despaired at the economic circumstances of that area. And they continue to do so today. It’s as if nothing has changed. I wonder how many other places on the list are also chronically depressed over a period of decades, with little to show for any attempts at economic revival.


13 posted on 04/15/2014 1:18:06 PM PDT by Dilbert San Diego (Im)
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To: SeekAndFind

All thanks to the EPA and Agenda 21. The New World Order plan is wonderful and living under the United Nations is going to be even better!


14 posted on 04/15/2014 1:19:35 PM PDT by B4Ranch (Name your illness, do a Google & YouTube search with "hydrogen peroxide". Do it and be surprised.)
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To: SeekAndFind

Saginaw, Michigan - Lefty Frizzell

I was born in Saginaw, Michigan.
I grew up in a house on Saginaw Bay.
My dad was a poor hard working Saginaw fisherman:
Too many times he came home with too little pay.

I loved a girl in Saginaw, Michigan.
The daughter of a wealthy, wealthy man.
But he called me: “That son of a Saginaw fisherman.”
And not good enough to claim his daughter’s hand.

Now I’m up here in Alaska looking around for gold.
Like a crazy fool I’m a digging in this frozen ground, so cold.
But with each new day I pray I’ll strike it rich and then,
I’ll go back home and claim my love in Saginaw, Michigan.

I wrote my love in Saginaw, Michigan.
I said: “Honey, I’m a coming home, please wait for me.
“And you can tell your dad, I’m coming back a richer man
“I’ve hit the biggest strike in Klondike history.”

Her dad met me in Saginaw, Michigan.
He gave me a great big party with champagne.
Then he said: “Son, you’re wise, young ambitious man.
“Will you sell your father-in-law your Klondike claim?”

Now he’s up there in Alaska digging in the cold, cold ground.
The greedy fool is a looking for the gold I never found.
It serves him right and no-one here is missing him.
Least of all the newly-weds of Saginaw, Michigan.

We’re the happiest man and wife in Saginaw, Michigan.
He’s ashamed to show his face in Saginaw, Michigan.


15 posted on 04/15/2014 1:23:56 PM PDT by Red Badger (LIberal is an oxymoron......................)
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To: SoFloFreeper

they are trying to conceal Chicago, NYC, LA, SF, etc.


16 posted on 04/15/2014 1:34:25 PM PDT by longtermmemmory (VOTE! http://www.senate.gov and http://www.house.gov)
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To: SeekAndFind

For Farmington,New Mexico

“the area’s per capita personal income was $33,092 in 2012, among the lowest in the country”

That figure make absolutely sense. One of the lowest? I don’t think so.

.


17 posted on 04/15/2014 1:44:53 PM PDT by Mears
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To: Buckeye McFrog

Johnstown, PA hitched their wagon to the corrupt John Murtha after the steel industry went down. For thirty years they relied on him bringing home government pork to keep the town employed.

KARMA....she’s a b#tch. couldn’t happen to a better collection of parasites.


18 posted on 04/15/2014 1:48:35 PM PDT by Dick Vomer (democrats are like flies, whatever they don't eat they sh#t on.)
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To: Mears

Oops,typo Re Post 17-—Makes NO sense.

.


19 posted on 04/15/2014 1:49:26 PM PDT by Mears
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To: SoFloFreeper
Sounds like they really had to scrape the bottom of the barrel to come up with this list. Ohio, Michigan, West Virginia, I get depressed just driving through those areas.

And yes, they are more large towns than cities. Saginaw, Steubenville, Carson City, Cumberland, Pine Bluff, etc., you've got to be kidding me! Around here, we call towns of that size suburbs.

20 posted on 04/15/2014 1:59:36 PM PDT by SamAdams76
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To: SeekAndFind

Surprising. I didn’t know Flint still existed.


21 posted on 04/15/2014 2:18:56 PM PDT by Vince Ferrer
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To: SeekAndFind

Hartford, Connecticut is not the fastest shrinking city? I know insurance and aircraft engines and guns are not growing in Connecticut.


22 posted on 04/15/2014 3:35:29 PM PDT by ExCTCitizen (I'm ExCTCitizen and I approve this reply. If it does offend Libs, I'm NOT sorry...)
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To: AdmSmith; AnonymousConservative; Berosus; bigheadfred; Bockscar; cardinal4; ColdOne; ...

Thanks SeekAndFind, sidebar:

New 2014 Rich States, Poor States Rankings Show States Are Making Large Reforms
American Legislator | 4-15-14 | Ben Wilterdink
Posted on 4/15/2014 4:16:30 PM by ThethoughtsofGreg
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/3144731/posts


23 posted on 04/15/2014 7:08:50 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SeekAndFind

These lists never seem to cover what would be really useful knowledge for people looking to possibly relocate.

What small cities or large towns have a low unemployment rate, low crime, low taxes, very affordable residential real estate, a pleasant climate and are in reasonable proximity to natural beauty and outdoor recreation?

Those are the places people would want to know about.


24 posted on 04/15/2014 7:21:03 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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