Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

The Curmudgeon's Guide to Getting Ahead: Dos and Don'ts of Right Behavior, Tough Thinking and more
www.amazon.com ^ | April 8, 2014 | Charles Murray

Posted on 04/20/2014 5:47:09 AM PDT by dennisw

The Curmudgeon's Guide to Getting Ahead: Dos and Don'ts of Right Behavior, Tough Thinking, Clear Writing, and Living a Good Life [Kindle Edition]

Charles Murray (Author)

5.0 out of 5 stars See all reviews (8 customer reviews) Print List Price: $17.95

Sold by: Random House LLC Length: 146 pages (Contains Real Page Numbers) Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here. Whispersync for Voice: Ready


TOPICS: Books/Literature; Computers/Internet; Education
KEYWORDS:
Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 37 people found the following review helpful Good advice for the young (and for the nearly curmudgeonly) By Paul A. Mastin on April 8, 2014 Format: Hardcover I have been a fan of Charles Murray since I read his classic Losing Ground while I was in college. Many are familiar with Murray's always thought-provoking and insightful work in his books and his work with the American Enterprise Institute. During his tenure at AEI, he as seen countless college interns and young scholars come through their doors. His new book, The Curmudgeon's Guide to Getting Ahead, is a wonderful distillation of practical advice for these young people and others.

As a writer, Murray is of course concerned with language usage, in both written and spoken communication. Most of it is standard style manual material, but this passage stands out: "Do you use the word like as a verbal tic? I mean, like, do you insert it in, like, random points in your, like, spoken conversation? If the answer is yes, this is the single most important tip in the entire book: STOP IT!" Well said! His tips on writing (and re-writing) are worth a read for any aspiring writer.

Some of his advice will seem old-fashioned and out of date, but it's still hard to argue with it. Speaking of tattoos, he agrees that they have a place in history, "first among savage tribes and then, more recently, among the lowest classes of Western societies." He reluctantly makes exceptions for insignias from the armed forces, but clearly advises against any visible tattoos.

Some of his best advice is for that class of students and young people who end up in places like AEI for internships, which he calls "affirmative action for the advantaged." He argues that while internships can be beneficial, much more beneficial would be summer jobs in the service sector, in order to be around people of all classes and learning how to wait on people rather than being waited on. Any sort of cultural exposure is beneficial, since "we aren't required to love all of our fellow Americans. But we should know from personal experience we're talking about."

Murray covers a lot in a relatively short space. The Curmudgeon's Guide would make a great gift for the college graduates in your life, but even for someone getting closer and closer to a curmudgeonly age, there is plenty to learn and think about here.

Thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for the complimentary electronic review copy!

1 posted on 04/20/2014 5:47:09 AM PDT by dennisw
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: dennisw

This book will be a good gift for a young person, son, daughter etc grandson etc


2 posted on 04/20/2014 5:48:49 AM PDT by dennisw (The first principle is to find out who you are then you can achieve anything -- Buddhist monk)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dennisw

Sounds great.. Best of luck.. We need these today, since we stopped teaching the need to strive for quality standards..


3 posted on 04/20/2014 6:09:21 AM PDT by carlo3b (Corrupt politicians make the other ten percent look bad.. Henry Kissinger)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dennisw
learning how to wait on people rather than being waited on.

Service to others is always important.

It's hard to be a leader. There are skills required which not everyone possesses.
It's hard to be a follower.There are skills required which not everyone possesses.

I know a lot of people who cannot follow. They cannot serve. They need to be right 100% of the time. They need to have all the answers to everything. You know nothing. They know it all, and they will not take directions or suggestions. Why should they value your input? They're the leader!

Most bad leaders have a distinct inability to follow. They cannot serve anyone but themselves.

4 posted on 04/20/2014 6:11:16 AM PDT by ClearCase_guy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ClearCase_guy

By the way, the people who push “public service” — such as Hillary Clinton — are the most incompetent servants. Those people want to be Lords and have others wait on them hand and foot. They need to be served constantly — and they deserve it!! After all, they are all about “public service”, so they’re just better than you.


5 posted on 04/20/2014 6:13:08 AM PDT by ClearCase_guy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: dennisw

Available in HARCOVER too! and Kindle which can be read on a PC too...


6 posted on 04/20/2014 6:15:56 AM PDT by dennisw (The first principle is to find out who you are then you can achieve anything -- Buddhist monk)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson