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More questions than answers as mystery of domestication deepens
Washington University in St Louis ^ | Monday, April 21, 2014 | Diana Lutz

Posted on 04/23/2014 11:25:00 AM PDT by SunkenCiv

...why did people domesticate a mere dozen or so of the roughly 200,000 species of wild flowering plants? And why only about five of the 148 species of large wild mammalian herbivores or omnivores? And while we’re at it, why haven’t more species of either plants or animals been domesticated in modern times? ...

[Fiona Marshall:] “We used to think cats and dogs were real outliers in the animal domestication process because they were attracted to human settlements for food and in some sense domesticated themselves. But new research is showing that other domesticated animals may be more like cats and dogs than we thought."

...the first domestications may have been triggered by climate change at the end of the last ice age — in combination with social issues.

As a result, people abandoned the hunter-gatherer lifestyle they had successfully followed for 95 percent of human history and turned instead to the new strategies of farming and herding.

As we head into a new era of climate change, Marshall said it would be comforting to know that we understood what happened then and why.

(Excerpt) Read more at news.wustl.edu ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: agriculture; animalhusbandry; dietandcuisine; domestication; godsgravesglyphs; helixmakemineadouble; huntergatherers
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To: Little Bill

Pinto Pete was danged lucky that no one liked horse meat that much, eh? :’)


21 posted on 04/23/2014 1:28:47 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv

It’s just wrong that to get money for very valid and interesting research some “climate change” angle seems necessary.


22 posted on 04/23/2014 1:30:45 PM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: colorado tanker

That’s one of the problems of modern interdisciplinary studies. It shouldn’t have to be.


23 posted on 04/23/2014 1:32:13 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Mariner

:’) The main advantage to, for example, the auroch, which was (or at least believed to be) the wild species from which modern cattle come, is that they didn’t run needlessly and didn’t care much whether there was a barrier around them so long as the food was available.

Even before domestication, the open range for the animals made it possible to hunt them effectively without necessarily moving around by the season, because they moved by the herd and stayed in areas where their food was. My belief is that meat was so desirable — and the higher protein led to more brain development in utero and in childhood — that fixed communities of hunter-gatherers were the transitional phase between migratory human bands and settled agriculture.


24 posted on 04/23/2014 1:50:54 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump World Heritage Site
http://history.alberta.ca/headsmashedin/

Earliest Mound Site
http://archive.archaeology.org/9801/newsbriefs/mounds.html

Watson Brake, a Middle Archaic Mound Complex in Northeast Louisiana
http://www.saa.org/AbouttheSociety/Publications/AmericanAntiquity/Volume70Number4October2005/WatsonBrakeaMiddleArchaicMoundComplexinN/tabid/501/Default.aspx

Ouachita River Mounds: A Five Millennium Mystery
http://www.louisianafolklife.org/LT/Articles_Essays/ouachita_mds.html

Myth of the Hunter-Gatherer
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/bloggers/1190694/posts


25 posted on 04/23/2014 1:54:47 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Tallguy
Dogs First Domesticated in Europe over 18,000 Years Ago, mtDNA Study Shows

Also, I've read that one guy speculates that dogs domesticated us.

26 posted on 04/23/2014 2:10:45 PM PDT by blam
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To: Jeff Chandler

http://news.discovery.com/animals/pets/dogs-not-as-close-kin-to-wolves-as-thought-140116.htm


27 posted on 04/23/2014 2:35:39 PM PDT by Salamander (Agent Of Fortune)
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To: SunkenCiv
That is where Natural Selection came in, my Grandfather died and my Uncle gave him to another farmer and Old Pete was taken out of the gene pool shortly there after.

I can't remember if he was bred but if he was I am sure that his foals noticed the consequences of bad behavior and adjusted.

28 posted on 04/23/2014 2:35:50 PM PDT by Little Bill (EVICT Queen Jean)
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To: SunkenCiv
I've spent thousands of years with zebras on a domestication project. Finally, using MRI technology and deep brain scans, we've discovered what's at issue.

It's the stripes.

Zebras just don't see themselves as part of civilized society.

29 posted on 04/23/2014 3:06:37 PM PDT by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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To: SunkenCiv

RC = Roman Catholic years?


30 posted on 04/23/2014 3:08:46 PM PDT by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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To: SunkenCiv

And just small marginal differences between groups would quickly add up. Think of Koreans when Americans first came during the war. They were small, but now Koreans are as big as an average American, though not quite so tasty when bbq’d.


31 posted on 04/23/2014 3:11:10 PM PDT by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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To: 1010RD

:’)


32 posted on 04/23/2014 3:26:52 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: 1010RD

Radiocarbon.


33 posted on 04/23/2014 3:27:04 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: muir_redwoods
Once you’ve got houses nd donkeys, why bother with zebras?

There are places where horses cannot do well because of the native pests, which do not affect zebras.
34 posted on 04/23/2014 4:31:01 PM PDT by Nepeta
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To: SunkenCiv
It was all about beer, every last thing drills down to beer when you dig back through history.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Humans originally existed as members of small bands of nomadic hunters/gatherers. They lived on deer in the mountains during the summer and would go to the coast and live on fish and lobster in the winter.

The two most important events in all of history were the invention of beer and the invention of the wheel. The wheel was invented to get man to the beer. These were the foundation of modern civilization and together were the catalyst for the splitting of humanity into two distinct subgroups:

1. Liberals; and
2. Conservatives.

Once beer was discovered, it required grain and that was the beginning of agriculture. Neither the glass bottle nor aluminum can were invented yet, so while our early humans were sitting around waiting for them to be invented, they just stayed close to the brewery. That's how villages were formed.

Some men spent their days tracking and killing animals to B-B-Q at night while they were drinking beer. This was the beginning of what is known as the Conservative movement.

Other men who were weaker and less skilled at hunting learned to live off the conservatives by showing up for the nightly B-B-Q’s and doing the sewing, fetching, and hair dressing. This was the beginning of the Liberal movement.

Some of these liberal men eventually evolved into women. The rest became known as girliemen.

35 posted on 04/23/2014 4:43:43 PM PDT by Hootowl99
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To: Fractal Trader
I disagree about the first plant cultivation. I think that, at a much earlier date, man would have domesticated fruit trees such as olives, figs, and apples.

I tend to agree.

And a grove of trees at winter camp would be able to be left to grow without supervision ready to be picked when you returned in the fall.

36 posted on 04/23/2014 4:49:11 PM PDT by Harmless Teddy Bear (Proud Infidel, Gun Nut, Religious Fanatic and Freedom Fiend)
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To: muir_redwoods
Once you’ve got houses nd donkeys, why bother with zebras?

Hard to disagree with that. I'd much rather live in a house than a zebra :).

37 posted on 04/23/2014 8:41:27 PM PDT by MCH
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