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To: SunkenCiv
...why did people domesticate a mere dozen or so of the roughly 200,000 species of wild flowering plants? And why only about five of the 148 species of large wild mammalian herbivores or omnivores? And while we’re at it, why haven’t more species of either plants or animals been domesticated in modern times?

Because those were the plants that tasted good and weren't overly difficult to grow. As for the animals, try milking a jaguar. Seriously, it would be too hard to breed a deer that couldn't jump a fence, or to build fences that would hold them. Additionally, venison bacon sucks.

13 posted on 04/23/2014 12:15:24 PM PDT by SampleMan (Feral Humans are the refuse of socialism.)
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To: SampleMan

I think they’re on the ball regarding the predisposition of some species to be domesticated. Some species, such as deer, talking birds, etc, can be hand-tamed from early in life, and yet still have to be kept confined in some way. A preceramic culture left the mainland for Cyprus about 8000 years ago and built a village that was inhabited for some period of time. Their origin is known because all the remains of food species in their rubbish tips were from the mainland, and included a species of deer which they’d corral (and maybe preemptively cripple) and slaughter as needed. Of course, animal husbandry of that kind requires agriculture to supply feed.


14 posted on 04/23/2014 12:41:37 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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