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Vitamin D and its effect on weight loss examined in new study
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center ^ | April 22, 2014 | NA

Posted on 04/25/2014 8:57:59 AM PDT by neverdem

Caitlin Mason

Dr. Caitlin Mason in her office at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center on April 19, 2014

Photo by Robert Hood / Fred Hutch

Click for high-res version

SEATTLE - April 22, 2014 - A new study published online April 18 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggests that healthy or “replete” levels of vitamin D may be associated with weight loss in a certain segment of postmenopausal overweight women.

Scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center looked at the results of Vitamin D supplementation on a group of overweight women ages 50 to 75 who tested low in D. The research was conducted as part of the Vitamin D, Diet and Activity study at the Hutch.

Vitamin D has multiple physiologic functions beyond its classically recognized role in calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism. Vitamin D receptors are found in more than 30 cell types and the focus has recently switched from bone health to vitamin D’s effect on cancer, cardiovascular health, and other areas, such as weight loss.

“Vitamin D is certainly having its day in the spotlight,” said Dr. Caitlin Mason, researcher at the Hutch’s Public Health Sciences who worked on the vitamin D and weight loss study. “But we still have a lot to understand.”

 The study compared 12 months of oral vitamin D supplementation (2000 IU/d) compared with placebo on changes in weight, body composition, and metabolic markers [insulin and C-reactive protein (CRP)] during a structured behavioral weight-loss program in overweight and obese postmenopausal women.

Women who took vitamin D in addition to participating in a diet and exercise weight loss program lost similar amounts of weight to those who just completed the weight loss program. There were also no significant differences in the reduction in weight corrected for height, waist circumference, percentage body fat, trunk fat, insulin or C-reactive protein.

However, women randomly assigned to vitamin D supplementation who became replete [i.e., whose blood levels of 25(OH)D rose to 32 ng/mL or greater] lost more weight and had greater improvements in body composition compared with women who did not become replete. These finding suggest a potential threshold effect and highlights the importance of considering changes in nutrient status rather than only the average magnitude of change.

The women whose D levels became replete lost an average of 19 pounds over the course of 12 months as compared to the women in the placebo group, who lost an average of 12 pounds during the same time period. Both groups participated in a reduced calorie diet and an exercise program that included approximately 45 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous aerobic activity a day, five days per week.

“This suggests women trying to lose weight might want to have their D levels checked by their provider and replenish their vitamin D levels either through supplements or sun and then have their D levels rechecked after a few months to make sure they’ve risen to a healthy level,” said Anne McTiernan, M.D., Ph.D., principal investigator of the study and a Member of the Fred Hutch Cancer Research Center’s Public Health Sciences Division.

While the NIH lists anything over 50 ng/mL as too high, others in the scientific community consider anything between 30 ng/mL and 80 ng/mL as normal.  In the weight loss study, women were considered replete at around 32 ng/mL.

The report also demonstrated that women who took their vitamin D pills regularly showed a drop in C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation. If vitamin D can modify the metabolic alterations associated with obesity, then changes in circulating concentrations of vitamin D could modify obesity-disease relations.

“An overweight person’s body is in a state of chronic inflammation and all of these inflammation proteins that the body produces can cause things like elevated risk for cancer and diabetes,” said Catherine Duggan, Ph.D., principal staff scientist with the Fred Hutch Cancer Research Center’s Public Health Sciences Division. “Vitamin D helped with that. It could make the condition of being overweight less stressful on the body.”

# # #

At Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, home to three Nobel laureates, interdisciplinary teams of world-renowned scientists seek new and innovative ways to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer, HIV/AIDS and other life-threatening diseases. Fred Hutch’s pioneering work in bone marrow transplantation led to the development of immunotherapy, which harnesses the power of the immune system to treat cancer with minimal side effects. An independent, nonprofit research institute based in Seattle, Fred Hutch houses the nation’s first and largest cancer prevention research program, as well as the clinical coordinating center of the Women’s Health Initiative and the international headquarters of the HIV Vaccine Trials Network. Private contributions are essential for enabling Fred Hutch scientists to explore novel research opportunities that lead to important medical breakthroughs.



TOPICS: Health/Medicine; Science
KEYWORDS: vitamind; vitd; weightloss
Vitamin D3 supplementation during weight loss: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin D3 supplementation during weight loss did not increase weight loss or associated factors compared with placebo; however, women who became replete experienced greater improvements.

Who decided what level is replete? Maybe 2000 IU oral vitamin D3/d is too modest a dose? The race of the subjects was ignored.

1 posted on 04/25/2014 8:57:59 AM PDT by neverdem
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To: neverdem

What about “Vitamin D” production from exposure to the sun?


2 posted on 04/25/2014 9:03:30 AM PDT by a fool in paradise (The new witchhunt: "Do you NOW, . . . or have you EVER , . . supported traditional marriage?")
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To: neverdem
So women who took supplementation and reached the threshold for normal levels after being deficient lost more weight.
As a dieting man with a Vitamin D deficiency, I'd like to see a study on men. Either way, maybe I should take more than 2800 iu daily.
3 posted on 04/25/2014 9:03:30 AM PDT by rmlew ("Mosques are our barracks, minarets our bayonets, domes our helmets, the believers our soldiers.")
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To: neverdem
I've read that D3 should be taken in conjunction with K2; else calcium more easily forms arterial plaque. Thoughts?
4 posted on 04/25/2014 9:05:33 AM PDT by Carry_Okie (The tree of liberty needs a rope.)
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To: neverdem

Poor conclusions in the study. 19 lbs lost over 12 months versus 12 lbs lost over 12 months is statistically insignificant. Considering that both groups were on a reduced calorie/moderate exercise program, you could have said that water was the contributing factor (good luck finding a placebo for that, though). Without identifying other contributing factors such as race, family history, or restricting to the exact same diet, this study is worthless.


5 posted on 04/25/2014 9:08:00 AM PDT by rjsimmon (The Tree of Liberty Thirsts)
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To: rmlew

So, tanning _will_ make you literally look slimmer!


6 posted on 04/25/2014 9:12:36 AM PDT by glorgau
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To: a fool in paradise
What about “Vitamin D” production from exposure to the sun?

Women who sat on the beach or by the pool all day did not lose as much weight as the women who swam, jogged, or played volleyball in the sun.

;o)

7 posted on 04/25/2014 9:13:08 AM PDT by NautiNurse (Obama sends U.S. Marines to pick up his dog & basketballs. Benghazi? Nope.)
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To: neverdem

The likely reason a non-specific term such as “replete” was used, is that the optimal dosage would vary from one individual to the next due to physiology and genetic heritage. What “works” for one may not work for another, and vice versa. Supplementation with vitamins, minerals, herbs, etc. is like that. There can be a fair amount of trial and error.


8 posted on 04/25/2014 9:17:16 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: neverdem

‘Replete’ differs from one to another. If you’re supplementing you need to have your levels tested. Some people need 2000IU, some need 5000IU, some need 15000IU.


9 posted on 04/25/2014 9:18:55 AM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: Carry_Okie

Definitely take the K2 (or get it via diet) if you’re taking D3.

Organ meats, egg yolks and some hard cheeses have K2. You know, all those things we’re told not to eat or we’ll have a heart attack? Turns out that advice may have been misleading.

I take Thorne’s drops for K2 (MK4). And something from Jarrow whose name escapes me right now that’s a bone building supplement that has MK7 and a bunch of minerals besides.


10 posted on 04/25/2014 9:21:09 AM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: a fool in paradise
What about “Vitamin D” production from exposure to the sun?

Sun exposure was mentioned in the press release, but not in the abstract. The measured variable was serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D].

11 posted on 04/25/2014 9:31:21 AM PDT by neverdem (Register pressure cookers! /s)
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To: neverdem

I’m not a doctor, but I think 2000 IU is a pretty low dose. I take at least twice that much, and it has really turned a lot of health problems around.

It’s especially important to take Vitamin D3 in the winter, if you don’t get much sun. And in the summer, too, if you use a lot of sunscreen and avoid tanning.

Just my opinion. I’m not a doctor. But my doctor was converted to Vitamin D after I sent him a few articles on it.


12 posted on 04/25/2014 9:33:46 AM PDT by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: a fool in paradise

I’ve noticed that those seniors who take long walks in the sun or do high-energy lawnwork during the day are not overweight. So I got the perfect exercise equipment....a good-sized dog who walks me a few miles every day.


13 posted on 04/25/2014 9:37:26 AM PDT by grania
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To: onedoug

ping


14 posted on 04/25/2014 9:37:57 AM PDT by windcliff
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To: grania
I’ve noticed that those seniors who take long walks in the sun or do high-energy lawnwork during the day are not overweight.

Doesn't imply causation.

15 posted on 04/25/2014 9:49:08 AM PDT by steve86 (Acerbic by nature not nurture)
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To: Carry_Okie

Food-grade hydrogen peroxide in very dilute amounts in water gets rid of arterial plaque.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G3BcmgXiI30

Yes, I have tried it and it seems to work.


16 posted on 04/25/2014 9:49:29 AM PDT by Jack Hydrazine (Pubbies = national collectivists; Dems = international collectivists; We need a second party!)
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To: Carry_Okie; Black Agnes
I've read that D3 should be taken in conjunction with K2; else calcium more easily forms arterial plaque. Thoughts?

IIRC, John Cannell MD hawks his D3 with K2, Boron and magnesium.

There was an article in Family Practice News a few years ago. It mentioned blacks taking D3 supplements getting a lot of calcified arteries in larger vessels, e.g. aorta and carotids.

17 posted on 04/25/2014 9:50:07 AM PDT by neverdem (Register pressure cookers! /s)
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To: a fool in paradise

“What about “Vitamin D” production from exposure to the sun?”

That doesn’t happen here in the Cleveland, Oh area!


18 posted on 04/25/2014 9:51:32 AM PDT by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ( Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end!)
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To: NautiNurse

:) Good one NN


19 posted on 04/25/2014 10:00:17 AM PDT by poobear (Socialism in the minds of the elites, is a con-game for the serfs, nothing more.)
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To: rmlew

Do you get tested for your Vitamin D levels every 3 months? You can take 10,000 IU a day. Some docs prescribe one dose of 50,000 IU once a week. Talk to your doc if your levels aren’t going up much with your current dose.


20 posted on 04/25/2014 10:02:00 AM PDT by Abigail Adams
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To: steve86
Doesn't imply causation

Exercising outside isn't making them fat. I'll grant you that people who spend the day outside might spend less idle time in the house eating. Whatever the causation, emulating the lifestyles of people who lead long, active, healthy lives can't hurt.

21 posted on 04/25/2014 10:04:17 AM PDT by grania
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To: neverdem

I love it when the medical profession FINALLY starts looking at nutritional supplements.

My very distinguished doc looked at the list I brought him of all the supplements I take. “They won’t hurt you,” he said. Ten years later, he’s undergoing experimental treatment for his life threatening melanoma, and he just wrote a paper on the benefits of a vegan diet and supplementation with — gasp — vitamins.

Here’s some good info on Vitamin K from Thorne, an excellent supplement company:

http://www.thorne.com/altmedrev/.fulltext/14/3/284.pdf


22 posted on 04/25/2014 10:06:36 AM PDT by Veto! (OpInions freely dispensed as advice)
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To: glorgau
So, tanning _will_ make you literally look slimmer!

Well I don't know about that, but I have always heard that tanned fat looks better than pale, pasty fat. What do you prefer, a nice roasted brown turkey or a pale raw turkey?

23 posted on 04/25/2014 10:21:05 AM PDT by Mastador1 (I'll take a bad dog over a good politician any day!)
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To: rjsimmon
19 lbs lost over 12 months versus 12 lbs lost over 12 months is statistically insignificant.

The article itself cites statistical significance at the .05 level. Other measures were also significant.

24 posted on 04/25/2014 10:45:39 AM PDT by hinckley buzzard
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To: hinckley buzzard
The article itself cites statistical significance at the .05 level. Other measures were also significant.

All within one standard deviation. Insignificant.

25 posted on 04/25/2014 10:48:07 AM PDT by rjsimmon (The Tree of Liberty Thirsts)
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To: Black Agnes

I take 680 mg of strontium and 500 mg chelated magnesium to build bone, or to fight osteoporosis.


26 posted on 04/25/2014 10:49:39 AM PDT by FrdmLvr ("WE ARE ALL OSAMA, 0BAMA!" al-Qaeda terrorists who breached the American compound in Benghazi)
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To: Veto!

I take 100 mcg Vitamin K1/day (Country Life). Is K2 better?


27 posted on 04/25/2014 11:08:53 AM PDT by FrdmLvr ("WE ARE ALL OSAMA, 0BAMA!" al-Qaeda terrorists who breached the American compound in Benghazi)
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To: rjsimmon

A P value of 0.05 indicates a 95% Confidence Interval - that is the definition of a statistically significant event.


28 posted on 04/25/2014 11:31:19 AM PDT by dadgum (Overjoyed to be the Pariah.)
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To: Cicero

“It’s especially important to take Vitamin D3 in the winter, if you don’t get much sun.”

Everyone who lives above of 33* N Latitude (which is Los Angeles, CA) does not get enough sunlight to make sufficient vitamin D. Here in N. Idaho I advise my patients to take a minimum of 2000iu every day.


29 posted on 04/25/2014 11:32:11 AM PDT by 43north (BHO: 50% black, 50% white, 100% RED.)
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To: dadgum

You are correct. I misread their data.


30 posted on 04/25/2014 11:38:59 AM PDT by rjsimmon (The Tree of Liberty Thirsts)
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To: 43north

“I advise my patients to take a minimum of 2000iu every day.”

That is good. Everybody needs D3 and here in Ohio I advise all my clients that they should do 10,000 iu per day. This is well below any toxicity levels and is better than a flu shot for prevention. Flu shots are hazardous. D3 is not. Dark skinned people do not do well getting vitamin D from the sun and even in Florida they should do the 10,000 units of D3, in my opinion.


31 posted on 04/25/2014 11:42:18 AM PDT by GGpaX4DumpedTea (I am a Tea Party descendant...steeped in the Constitutional Republic given to us by the Founders)
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To: FrdmLvr

K1 is the one that’s involved in blood clotting. K2 is the one involved in bone formation. It’s responsible for keeping calcium in your bones and not your arteries. There are several varieties of K2. MK4 and MK7 seem to be the ones that are most studied at this point. I take a little of both each day.

Read up on K2, D3 and varieties and dosing. Especially if you have issues with blood clotting or stickiness.

My internist takes MK4 and MK7. The MK4 every day and the MK7 2 or 3 times a week as it stays in the blood longer.

YMMV of course.

IF you’re on warfarin or other blood thinner ask your doc and have your INR monitored if you begin taking ANY K vitamin (K1 OR K2) as they can both interfere with INR values. Some docs have their warfarin patients adjust their warfarin dosage to a particular dose of K2 to lower the known risk of aortic stenosis associated with long term warfarin use.


32 posted on 04/25/2014 11:47:20 AM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: 43north

yes those lower latitudes can also change attitudes

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b7JpxavO9NE


33 posted on 04/25/2014 11:50:08 AM PDT by rolling_stone
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To: a fool in paradise

Some cannot process it for some reason so you take pills. I feel I have more energy from taking up to 10,000 IU a day. The sun gives you that in about 10 minutes. I take it because I was always feeling rundown. I also take iron. I stopped taking the thyroid med when the doctor told to start taking vitamin D.


34 posted on 04/25/2014 12:01:30 PM PDT by minnesota_bound
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To: rmlew
Either way, maybe I should take more than 2800 iu daily.

I take 4400 IU daily, 4000 IU as D3 and another 400 IU in a multivitamin which may be D2 or D3. IIRC, D2 needs a pass through the kidneys. When they do the serum assay it can be expressed as ng/ml, nanograms per milliliter or nmol/l, nanomoles per liter. Those units are not the same. Find out what units are being used and what's the normal range for serum 25(OH)D.

35 posted on 04/25/2014 12:18:31 PM PDT by neverdem (Register pressure cookers! /s)
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To: Black Agnes

Oh thank you! I’d read about Vitamin K being good for bones, so picked this up at the health food store. The bottle even mentioned it being specifically for bones. I will take your advice and look into it and then pick up what I need. I’m not on any meds, so nothing to interfere with. Or I should say, no meds to interfere with my supplements. Again, thank you. You’re very informative.


36 posted on 04/25/2014 12:31:51 PM PDT by FrdmLvr ("WE ARE ALL OSAMA, 0BAMA!" al-Qaeda terrorists who breached the American compound in Benghazi)
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To: minnesota_bound
I stopped taking the thyroid med when the doctor told to start taking vitamin D.

Why stop the thyroid med? That doesn't sound wise.

37 posted on 04/25/2014 1:21:19 PM PDT by neverdem (Register pressure cookers! /s)
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To: FrdmLvr

This is the stuff I currently take:

http://www.vitacost.com/jarrow-formulas-bone-up-superior-calcium-formula-360-capsules

http://www.iherb.com/Thorne-Research-Vitamin-K2-1-fl-oz-30-ml/21592

http://www.iherb.com/Healthy-Origins-Vitamin-D3-10-000-IU-360-Softgels/21298


38 posted on 04/25/2014 1:43:43 PM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: grania
"...seniors who take long walks in the sun or do high-energy lawnwork during the day are not overweight"

It is partly that they are not extremely overweight or otherwise very ill that they are able to take up these activities in the first place.

But emulating the healthy ones can't hurt; I agree.

39 posted on 04/25/2014 2:00:00 PM PDT by steve86 (Acerbic by nature not nurture)
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To: FrdmLvr

I have read that K2 is the good stuff. K1, not so much.

A ghastly fermented soy product called Natto is the best natural source of K2. I’ve tried it. Yuk. Plus, it’s very expensive and hard to find if you don’t have a Japanese market nearby.

I was diagnosed with osteoporosis, so I really need K2. I believe Thorne Research has the best, also available from Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/THORNE-RESEARCH-Vitamin-Liquid-Health/dp/B000FGWDTK

Another take on K2 from Dr. Sinatra, who is, I believe a reputable guy:

http://www.drsinatra.com/vitamin-k2-and-its-benefits

And a lengthy but readable discussion of K1 and K2 from Thorne Research:
http://www.thorne.com/altmedrev/.fulltext/14/3/284.pdf


40 posted on 04/25/2014 2:01:09 PM PDT by Veto! (OpInions freely dispensed as advice)
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To: Veto!

Thank you for your informative response. It’s been a great help!


41 posted on 04/25/2014 2:14:05 PM PDT by FrdmLvr ("WE ARE ALL OSAMA, 0BAMA!" al-Qaeda terrorists who breached the American compound in Benghazi)
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To: neverdem

I did not need it afterward.


42 posted on 04/25/2014 3:25:28 PM PDT by minnesota_bound
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To: minnesota_bound
I did not need it afterward.

Do you mean that you had an iron deficieny anemia, but your doc put you on a thyroid med as a therapeutic trial? Or are you being your own doc? Supplemental iron can become toxic. Look up hemochromotosis.

43 posted on 04/25/2014 3:45:03 PM PDT by neverdem (Register pressure cookers! /s)
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To: neverdem

6 doctors I went thru until the last who said take vitamin D and also said I was low in iron. He recommended 2000IU and after taking it for a bit I noticed I felt better. I stopped the thyroid pills (100mmg) then and up the vitamin D to 10000.
I had different docs give me different amounts of thyroid med. I think it was just an imbalance with all the blasted coca cola high fructose corn syrup. I stopped drinking soda except occasional diet sunkist. I avoid msg too.

Doctors practice medicine.
I even had one doc say I had diabetes.... which I do not. I just stopped drinking pop. My triglycerides and blood pressure went back to normal. I also take cinnamon pills which helps.


44 posted on 04/25/2014 4:27:56 PM PDT by minnesota_bound
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To: minnesota_bound
6 doctors I went thru until the last who said take vitamin D and also said I was low in iron.

The next questions are why are you low in iron. Ulcers? Cancer? I hope not, but you need answers. You don't have an iron deficiency anemia for no reason.

45 posted on 04/25/2014 5:56:58 PM PDT by neverdem (Register pressure cookers! /s)
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To: Black Agnes

http://www.greenpasture.org/public/Products/ButterOil/

is a naturally made supplement from grass fed cows which is a great source of all kinds of Vitamin K2.


46 posted on 04/27/2014 9:32:30 PM PDT by Fractal Trader
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To: neverdem
I've read that D3 should be taken in conjunction with K2; else calcium more easily forms arterial plaque.

Thoughts?

IIRC, John Cannell MD hawks his D3 with K2, Boron and magnesium. There was an article in Family Practice News a few years ago. It mentioned blacks taking D3 supplements getting a lot of calcified arteries in larger vessels, e.g. aorta and carotids.

I had a very mild stroke about 3-4 years ago. (Started having seizures in less than 24 hours after the stroke)I had absolutely no risk factors for a stroke other than a small atrial septal defect in my heart which no one knew about until a couple months ago. I was taking D3 with K2, Boron and magnesium at the time and have been too afraid to try it since then but not really sure it had anything to do with the stroke.

What do you think, could vitamin K have contributed to the stroke? I now take 81 mg. aspirin twice a day. At the time I was taking 81mg pretty regularly.

47 posted on 05/01/2014 4:16:05 AM PDT by muggs (Hope and Change = Hoax and Chains)
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