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Archaeologists find 'lost' medieval village... [Scotland]
Culture24 ^ | 28 April 2014 | Ben Miller

Posted on 05/01/2014 12:13:06 AM PDT by SunkenCiv

German and Dutch pots, jugs and mugs, coins including an American cent, spindles, a sheep skull and horse teeth have been found by archaeologists digging in the Scottish Borders, where doors integrated into walls have revealed a “lost” Medieval village of families, farmyards and hearths.

Between Edinburgh and the Northumberland National Park, the outskirts of Selkirk have previously been associated with the Battle of Philiphaugh, a 1645 victory for the Scottish Covenanter Army against their under-strength Royalist enemies...

A pipeline-laying project by Scottish Water, though, has found stone brick structures including two pivot stones, used as hinges for doors between the 14th and 16th centuries but turned into cobbling after their buildings were demolished.

Four coins, stone counters for games, burnt clay and fired fragments were also found...

“The radiocarbon dates confirm activity in the period from 1472 to 1645. Although the artefacts were recovered from the lower plough soil rather than sealed archaeological contexts, they too support a late 15th to 17th century date.

“Two pottery sherds from stoneware bottles, or possibly drinking mugs imported from Germany or Belgium, would date to that period. A fragment of a clay tobacco pipe identifies the maker as James Colquhoun, who manufactured pipes in Glasgow between 1660 and 1680.

“These artefacts also suggest that manufactured goods were being traded from the cities to the rural areas of Scotland.”

(Excerpt) Read more at culture24.org.uk ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: battleofphiliphaugh; godsgravesglyphs; medieval; middleages; renaissance; scotland; scotlandyet; selkirk
full title, "Archaeologists find 'lost' medieval village full of pottery, coins and bones in Scottish Borders".
Documentary research suggested a range of buildings were spread over a large area along the river Tweed © Guard Archaeology Ltd

Documentary research suggested a range of buildings were spread over a large area along the river Tweed © Guard Archaeology Ltd

1 posted on 05/01/2014 12:13:06 AM PDT by SunkenCiv
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To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

2 posted on 05/01/2014 12:13:55 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv


3 posted on 05/01/2014 12:18:48 AM PDT by JoeProBono (SOME IMAGES MAY BE DISTURBING VIEWER DISCRETION IS ADVISED;-{)
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To: SunkenCiv

So after Shakespeare and the Kings James Bible era and countless written sources we need to unearth a few coins and trinkets to tell us about life there??? Next they’ll be digging around Liverpool to tell us about the Beatles.


4 posted on 05/01/2014 12:19:23 AM PDT by Monterrosa-24 (...even more American than a French bikini and a Russian AK-47.)
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To: Monterrosa-24

‘Ah, Shakespeare.’


5 posted on 05/01/2014 12:25:29 AM PDT by onedoug
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To: SunkenCiv

Medieval? The medieval period began around 476 AD and ended around 1450-1492 AD. This hamlet is a little old to be labeled medieval. What ARE they teaching inschools nowadays?


6 posted on 05/01/2014 12:52:01 AM PDT by Jemian
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To: Jemian
“The radiocarbon dates confirm activity in the period from 1472 to 1645.

Medieval? The medieval period began around 476 AD and ended around 1450-1492 AD.

Uh, looks like Medieval Times to me.

7 posted on 05/01/2014 2:37:42 AM PDT by raybbr (Obamacare needs a death panel.)
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To: SunkenCiv
Two pottery sherds from stoneware bottles

Sherd = shard. I had to look that one up.

8 posted on 05/01/2014 2:47:38 AM PDT by exDemMom (Current visual of the hole the US continues to dig itself into: http://www.usdebtclock.org/)
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To: Monterrosa-24
So after Shakespeare and the Kings James Bible era and countless written sources we need to unearth a few coins and trinkets to tell us about life there???

Most written sources give no real sense of how people actually lived. You only get that sense by examining where they lived and the objects they used in daily life.

9 posted on 05/01/2014 2:50:00 AM PDT by exDemMom (Current visual of the hole the US continues to dig itself into: http://www.usdebtclock.org/)
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To: SunkenCiv

coins including an American cent,

Obviously dropped by some wayward time traveler....


10 posted on 05/01/2014 3:18:58 AM PDT by Adder (No, Mr. Franklin, we could NOT keep it.)
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To: SunkenCiv
… coins including an American cent…
Prior to 1645?
11 posted on 05/01/2014 3:23:27 AM PDT by R. Scott (Humanity i love you because when you're hard up you pawn your Intelligence to buy a drink)
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To: R. Scott
No doubt, brought back to Scotland by Henry Sinclair, the Earl of Rosslyn, who explored the North American continent in 1398. The Aztecs worked gold, so they could have worked copper, and the equivalent of a penny's worth of copper could have made it far enough north to have been traded to Sinclair, who could have brought it back to Scotland. Sinclair also had an Italian navigator, by the way. ;-)
12 posted on 05/01/2014 3:51:26 AM PDT by Pecos (The Chicago Way: Kill the Constitution, one step at a time.)
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To: exDemMom

The English butchered the original Scot language. The English wreck everything.


13 posted on 05/01/2014 4:03:06 AM PDT by Vermont Lt (If you want to keep your dignity, you can keep it. Period........ Just kidding, you can't keep it.)
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To: Jemian

I thought that too, but then figured it was probably a village established in the medieval era but was still inhabited in the 1600’s, qualifying it as medieval.


14 posted on 05/01/2014 5:32:11 AM PDT by FrdmLvr ("WE ARE ALL OSAMA, 0BAMA!" al-Qaeda terrorists who breached the American compound in Benghazi)
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To: raybbr

1472 - 1645 is just after the medieval period, not during. This, iirc, was the Tudor and Elizabethan period.


15 posted on 05/01/2014 5:34:01 AM PDT by Jemian
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To: FrdmLvr

I considered that, but nothing from the article suggests they’ve found anything from the years cited. The simplest explanation is the writer didn’t know history and just tossed the term “medieval” in on his own.


16 posted on 05/01/2014 5:40:44 AM PDT by Jemian
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To: Jemian

Edit on my previos post: “they didn’t find anything PRIOR to the years cited...”


17 posted on 05/01/2014 5:42:04 AM PDT by Jemian
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To: SunkenCiv

1472 to 1645 would be “Renaissance”, not “Medieval”.

Of course, the remote location could have made life there “seem” Medieval.

JMO...I am not an Archaeologist. Just a Humble Bass Player...what do I know?


18 posted on 05/01/2014 7:05:21 AM PDT by left that other site (You shall know the Truth, and The Truth Shall Set You Free.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Brigadoon?


19 posted on 05/01/2014 7:08:58 AM PDT by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: Jemian

Personally, I think of 476 AD as pre-Medieval, and part of the Dark Ages.


20 posted on 05/01/2014 7:10:01 AM PDT by MrsEmmaPeel (a government big enough to give you everything you want, is big enough to take everything you have)
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To: SunkenCiv

***“The radiocarbon dates confirm activity in the period from 1472 to 1645. **

Ending in the Plague years.


21 posted on 05/01/2014 7:33:17 AM PDT by Ruy Dias de Bivar (Sometimes you need 7+ more ammo. LOTS MORE.)
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To: BenLurkin

Yeah, my take on the headline was that it was still a working village that had been overlooked in the modern era.


22 posted on 05/01/2014 10:02:47 AM PDT by wildbill
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To: Ruy Dias de Bivar

Good idea, and that might account for all memory of the town having been lost.

‘In 1350, there was a great pestilence and mortality of men in the kingdom of Scotland, and this pestilence also raged for many years before and after in various parts of the world.’

Scotichronicon, John of Fordun

http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/scotlandshistory/medievallife/blackdeath/index.asp


23 posted on 05/01/2014 10:07:28 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: exDemMom

“...Most written sources give no real sense of how people actually lived. You only get that sense by examining where they lived and the objects they used in daily life...”

“Or suppose a woman has ten silver coins[a] and loses one. Doesn’t she light a lamp, sweep the house and search carefully until she finds it?”


24 posted on 05/01/2014 12:47:19 PM PDT by Monterrosa-24 (...even more American than a French bikini and a Russian AK-47.)
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To: left that other site

Obviously you’ve never been to Scotland. [ducks, runs]

You play a bass?!? You should switch to something more musical, like bagpipes! ;’)


25 posted on 05/01/2014 3:29:34 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: BenLurkin

Turns out that Brigadoon didn’t really vanish and then reappear, the witnesses were just drunk.


26 posted on 05/01/2014 3:30:11 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: R. Scott; Pecos; wildbill

American Colonial Penny image search:

https://www.google.com/search?q=american+colonial+penny&tbm=isch


27 posted on 05/01/2014 3:36:02 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Vermont Lt

Steeleye Span - Parcel of Rogues
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gLufwtSZiIs


28 posted on 05/01/2014 3:37:22 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: exDemMom

Thanks exDemMom!


29 posted on 05/01/2014 3:37:47 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: raybbr; Jemian; FrdmLvr

When posting this topic, I put both terms into the keywords.


30 posted on 05/01/2014 3:38:29 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: raybbr; Jemian; FrdmLvr

Okay, so, I hadn’t actually done it yet, turns out that was a slightly earlier topic.


31 posted on 05/01/2014 3:39:44 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Adder

Whoops, sorry, missed you.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/3150742/posts?page=27#27


32 posted on 05/01/2014 3:40:20 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: JoeProBono

?


33 posted on 05/01/2014 3:41:32 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Adder; SunkenCiv
coins including an American cent, Obviously dropped by some wayward time traveler....

Is that the one with President Jefferson Davis on it?

-PJ

34 posted on 05/01/2014 3:45:26 PM PDT by Political Junkie Too (If you are the Posterity of We the People, then you are a Natural Born Citizen.)
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To: SunkenCiv

The ‘Silian 3’ stone was discovered by chance alongside a stream in the Welsh village of Silian.

http://www.foxnews.com/science/2013/06/18/long-lost-medieval-stone-with-mysterious-carvings-discovered-in-wales/


35 posted on 05/01/2014 4:16:11 PM PDT by JoeProBono (SOME IMAGES MAY BE DISTURBING VIEWER DISCRETION IS ADVISED;-{)
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To: SunkenCiv

“Tis ok...

Thanks!


36 posted on 05/01/2014 4:30:56 PM PDT by Adder (No, Mr. Franklin, we could NOT keep it.)
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To: SunkenCiv

So, did the ancient Scots actually invent Communism???


37 posted on 05/01/2014 4:36:10 PM PDT by Zionist Conspirator (The Left: speaking power to truth since Shevirat HaKelim.)
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To: SunkenCiv

What is the difference between a lawn mower and a bagpipe?

You can tune a lawn mower!

(Disclaimer: I am ON the Official FR Bagpipe Ping List! LOL!
It is a low volume ping list for a hig volume instrument.)


38 posted on 05/01/2014 4:49:52 PM PDT by left that other site (You shall know the Truth, and The Truth Shall Set You Free.)
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To: JoeProBono

Ah, thanks, maybe another topic in the offing.


39 posted on 05/01/2014 4:50:00 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Vermont Lt
The English wreck everything.

You paint with a wide brush, sir.

40 posted on 05/01/2014 5:00:23 PM PDT by Churchillspirit (9/11/2001 and 9/11/2012: NEVER FORGET.)
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To: left that other site

What’s the difference between bagpipes and an onion?

Nobody cries when you chop up bagpipes.


41 posted on 05/01/2014 5:42:55 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Political Junkie Too

Maybe it was just the coin that time traveled, someone cent it back in time.


42 posted on 05/01/2014 5:44:23 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv

He He He...

I have some pics of Pipers in the wind.

They can’t be posted on FR.


43 posted on 05/01/2014 5:51:16 PM PDT by left that other site (You shall know the Truth, and The Truth Shall Set You Free.)
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To: Churchillspirit

I was being a wee bit sarcastic.


44 posted on 05/01/2014 6:09:43 PM PDT by Vermont Lt (If you want to keep your dignity, you can keep it. Period........ Just kidding, you can't keep it.)
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To: SunkenCiv

But none as early as the article mentions.


45 posted on 05/02/2014 2:42:11 AM PDT by R. Scott (Humanity i love you because when you're hard up you pawn your Intelligence to buy a drink)
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To: left that other site

“Lad, I don’t know where you’ve been, but I see you’ve won first prize...”


46 posted on 05/02/2014 5:47:49 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv

BWA HA HA HA HA HA HA AHA!!!!!!



I know that joke! :-0
47 posted on 05/02/2014 6:11:25 AM PDT by left that other site (You shall know the Truth, and The Truth Shall Set You Free.)
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To: R. Scott

Coinage from the Americas earlier than 1700 is rare; early examples (I’ve got a 3 cent coin around here somewhere) are hard to find even online. Coin collectors have become wary of doing that, because an online photo can be used to create a convincing fake. The Spanish Real was a popular denomination, and the term “two bits” (still in use today referring to a US quarter dollar coin) derives from the practice of cutting a Real into 8 bits (”pieces of 8”); the Real remained legal currency in the US until 1857.

It’s not well known, and I’m sure it’s not taught in school, but the US gov’t didn’t get serious about having a national currency until not long before the Civil War. Around here, and probably everywhere on the frontier, we had “wildcat banks”, which issued their own currency, and were audited by state (or territorial) authorities, to make sure they had sufficient specie (gold and/or silver) in their safe/vault to back their scrip.


48 posted on 05/02/2014 8:26:54 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Vermont Lt; Churchillspirit

Or as they say in England, “keep your pecker up”.


49 posted on 05/02/2014 8:33:16 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv

Yep. As best I know our first coins were minted after 1780.


50 posted on 05/02/2014 2:12:56 PM PDT by R. Scott (Humanity i love you because when you're hard up you pawn your Intelligence to buy a drink)
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