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Credit Card Use Is Imprisoning Fewer Americans
Main St. ^ | May 1, 2014 | Ellen Chang

Posted on 05/02/2014 3:43:59 AM PDT by Enterprise

NEW YORK (MainStreet) — Americans are relying less on their credit cards now, and more consumers are able to pay their balance in full each month, according to a recent Gallup poll.

The poll found that in 2014 48% of Americans always pay the balance of their credit card each month compared to 42% who paid them in full in 2006 and only 43% in 2008 during the Great Recession.

Now only 33% of credit card owners say they leave a balance each month, which is a record low since Gallup began measuring these habits in 2001.

(Excerpt) Read more at mainstreet.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy
KEYWORDS: balances; consumers; creditcards; debt; shopping
Hey now, y'all are going to upset the banksters!
1 posted on 05/02/2014 3:43:59 AM PDT by Enterprise
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To: Enterprise

Hopefully people are falling out of love with debt.


2 posted on 05/02/2014 3:53:10 AM PDT by cripplecreek (Remember the River Raisin.)
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To: Enterprise

I pay all my cards in full. No interest required. Plus I make around $1000 a year from my costco Amex card. WIN WIN!


3 posted on 05/02/2014 3:53:12 AM PDT by Vaquero (Don't pick a fight with an old guy. If he is too old to fight, he'll just kill you.)
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To: Vaquero

“I pay all my cards in full.”
___________________________________________
I gave up all of my Master/Visa cards and used only my AMEX corporate card, where I had to pay in full every month.
When it last expired, I did not pay the high fee to renew.
When living internationally, it is not so widely accepted as advertised.


4 posted on 05/02/2014 4:04:00 AM PDT by AlexW
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To: Enterprise

It would be interesting to see how many people who had Credit cards in that period from 2001 to 2008 have lost their jobs and had to declare bankruptcy, thus clearing out most debt?


5 posted on 05/02/2014 4:15:05 AM PDT by The Working Man
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To: AlexW

Been credit card free for almost 10 years now. I’ll never look back.


6 posted on 05/02/2014 4:46:22 AM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: rarestia

“Been credit card free for almost 10 years now. I’ll never look back.”
_______________________________________________
I agree, but it is advisable to keep a debit card, or an AMEX that you have to pay in full each month.
One never knows what emergency could require their use.


7 posted on 05/02/2014 4:52:11 AM PDT by AlexW
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To: cripplecreek

People also in part used credit card debt when they were optimistic about their economic prospects in the future. E.g., a lot of startups were funded in that manner.


8 posted on 05/02/2014 4:56:47 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: rarestia

Do you not order anything online? Travel with a need for a rental card? Buy electronics for which an extended warranty is useful? Like the ability to dispute charges if something wasn’t delivered right?


9 posted on 05/02/2014 4:57:58 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: Enterprise
Credit Card Use Is Imprisoning Fewer Americans

The answer to this is simple. DON'T PAY FOR LIFESTYLE WITH DEBT. The instant gratification culture that prevails today has caused a massive load of irresponsible borrowing for things that are unnecessary.

Someone has maxed out their credit cards and is whining about not being able to get out of debt? Too bad. So sad. Save instead of borrow to start with.

10 posted on 05/02/2014 5:04:42 AM PDT by from occupied ga (Your government is your most dangerous enemy)
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To: rarestia
I pay for everything that I can with a credit card now, and I never pay any interest because I pay it off in full every month. The credit card has several advantages:
  1. I get 1.5% cash back
  2. I see exactly how much I'm spending and on what
  3. Some purchases qualify for an extended warranty
  4. I can buy stuff on line without using the odious paypal
just to name a few. There are some people who shouldn't have a credit card. One of my wife's friends couldn't get the concept that credit was not the same as cash, and that borrowed funds had to be repaid. She's always whining about how broke she is, but stints herself nothing.
11 posted on 05/02/2014 5:11:16 AM PDT by from occupied ga (Your government is your most dangerous enemy)
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To: AlexW
When living internationally, it is not so widely accepted as advertised.

Folks, notice how often in his posts Mr. Alex gets in the fact that he lives outside the United States. It's his claim to fame, poor thing.

12 posted on 05/02/2014 5:14:46 AM PDT by OldPossum ("It's" is the contraction of "it" and "is"; think about ITS implications.)
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To: from occupied ga

Save instead of borrow to start with. ....Save to use a credit card, get the rebates, use the rebates to pay off the card in a few months and come out ahead. Just like a part-time job.


13 posted on 05/02/2014 5:16:42 AM PDT by Safetgiver ( Islam makes barbarism look genteel.)
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To: Safetgiver
Save instead of borrow to start with

Excellent advice. Too bad so few people follow it. I wonder what the average debt of 0bama voters vs the average debt of conservatives is.

14 posted on 05/02/2014 5:33:41 AM PDT by from occupied ga (Your government is your most dangerous enemy)
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To: Enterprise
Maine votes to secede on June 12, 2018. On June 13, 2019, the bankers will have very rude awakening in the Republic of Maine.

While I am not at liberty to say exactly what, I can say this, the Republic of Maine will be a Christian nation that is a true Republic, not an oligarchy, like the US and the rest of the so called 'free' world democracies. There will be no federal reserve, nor will bankers or lawyers be in any place of power.

15 posted on 05/02/2014 6:10:51 AM PDT by The_Republic_Of_Maine (Be kept informed on Maine's secession, sign up at freemaine@hushmail.com)
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To: AlexW

The costco Amex is free to exec members and you can run a balance. I don’t run one. I get 1%- 3% back on all purchases. So not only do I not pay for the card but I get back between $700 and 1200 a year. Win win


16 posted on 05/02/2014 6:23:40 AM PDT by Vaquero (Don't pick a fight with an old guy. If he is too old to fight, he'll just kill you.)
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To: Enterprise

My advise on credit cards and debt is CASH whenever possible:

Charge to credit cards only if you need a record of the transaction otherwise cash is anonymous. Remember someone is watching what you buy and from whom.

By paying cash, you feel your spending habits immediately, not at the end of the period when the charges come due. Don’t have the cash, don’t buy.

If you charge, always pay off the charges in full each month thereby using their money interest free and maintaining a good credit rating. Never know when you might have a life (not life-style) emergency that requires temporarily going into debt.

Keep a small cash reserve at the ready. Cash gives you leverage to negotiate prices and to take advantage of special opportunities. Some transactions require cash only.

There are many more advantages to cash that I have not mentioned. I could go and on, but many freepers already know and practice this business model.

BTW, I didn’t say it was easy, you have to work your way through it.


17 posted on 05/02/2014 6:28:10 AM PDT by Texicanus (Texas, it's a whole 'nother country.)
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To: AlexW; 9YearLurker

I use a debit card for online purchases. I’ve had no problem disputing charges in the past. Most debit cards offer the same protections as credit. When my card number was stolen by a skimmer at a restaurant, they refunded me all of the money and apprehended the teen responsible for the fraud.

Banks take card fraud very seriously. I work for a CUSO with an enormous fraud department, and regardless if it’s debit or credit, they treat transactions the same.


18 posted on 05/02/2014 7:48:02 AM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: from occupied ga

As a recovering alcoholic, I’ve found that addiction can rear its ugly head in just about anything. I cut the credit cord many years ago, because I was finding that most luxury items could be had at the “swipe of a card.”

Instead, my wife and I budget our funds every month and only spend on large purchases when we have double the money saved that’s needed for the actual purchase. We are graduates of Dave Ramsey’s Financial Peace University, and we couldn’t be happier with our debt-free life.

Say what you want about “Cash back” and other gimmicks used by the card companies, I prefer to live my life under my own auspices. I don’t ever need to worry about reading fine print or dealing with the stress of calling an 800 number to deal with account issues. It’s much more peaceful this way, I believe.

To each their own...


19 posted on 05/02/2014 7:53:32 AM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: Enterprise

Polls are not fact or factual.

Consumer credit is as large as ever. Read the “Financial Accounts of the United States” quarterly report.

Half the people are not paying off their credit cards every month. Not even close. People lie about such status.


20 posted on 05/02/2014 8:11:49 AM PDT by CodeToad (Arm Up! They Are!)
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To: rarestia

One of the motivators in my using credit cards was lotto tickets. I used to use cash to buy stuff, but when gas stations started selling lotto tickets, I’d go in to give a depost for the fill up - wait five minutes while some retard tried to figure out the numbers for his ten lotto tickets, put in my deposit, go fill my car, and then go back in to get my change onto find another moron buying his dozen or so lotto tickts and another 5 - 10 minute wait.


21 posted on 05/02/2014 8:43:06 AM PDT by from occupied ga (Your government is your most dangerous enemy)
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To: rarestia

Credit unions in general have pretty good service, I think.

I wouldn’t want to use a debit card online.


22 posted on 05/02/2014 9:28:12 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: 9YearLurker

Never had a problem. I work in IT with a focus on a security, and I’ve been able to put a lot of protections in place to ensure my data is secure. *knock wood*


23 posted on 05/02/2014 9:38:01 AM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: rarestia

Then I’m especially surprised you’d take that risk. You are both at risk of having your actual funds wiped out and having to fight to get them back AND at the mercy of your bank.

BTW, how do you build your credit score without using credit cards?


24 posted on 05/02/2014 9:53:07 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: 9YearLurker

I’ve had my card number stolen in the past. All $800 was refunded to me the next day without so much as the stroke of a pen on some affidavits. My bank was very helpful and made the transaction painless.

Just for your reference, a MAJORITY of credit card fraud occurs at points of sale, not online. Thanks to SSL, you can shop online with a feeling of security provided the vendor is legit and keeps their security in check. Most card numbers are swiped at gas stations, unbranded ATMs, restaurants, and retail establishments (e.g. Target). My wife and I only buy what we can afford in cash. We never swipe our cards in restaurants or at retail stores. Most of our major shopping purchases are done online with Amazon.

As far as credit score, it’s a garbage measure. My credit score is well over 800, as I have a mortgage on which I stay current, and I assumed my wife’s old debts which we’ve paid down. Over time, however, I realize it will go down, and that’s okay. Banks still offer manual underwriting for customers if requested.

As Dave says, “There’s no need to bow to the FICO God.” It’s a meaningless number.


25 posted on 05/02/2014 10:09:39 AM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: rarestia

RE: credit card theft—I’m in IT, I know.

And to each his own. Sounds like you’ve already got a mortgage, don’t want cc credit, and have a job. So FICO isn’t very relevant to you. And you don’t mind having money stolen out of your account directly, because you think you’ll get it back quickly enough.


26 posted on 05/02/2014 10:37:09 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: 9YearLurker

??

I can feel the smug all the way over here, Lurker. It’s quite bright. Could you turn down the smugness a little bit? You’re hurting my eyes.

You can’t steal money from an account with a minimal footprint. There are a TON of things you can do to protect your information from criminals. Do the research instead of deriding me for my position.


27 posted on 05/02/2014 10:43:06 AM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: rarestia

You are the one who said you’d had $800 taken from your account—not I.

I said to each his own.

And yes, I think it is borderline irresponsible of you to be advocating that people here use their debit cards online.


28 posted on 05/02/2014 11:04:20 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
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To: 9YearLurker

Irresponsible how?! My card number was stolen by a teenager (the actual SERVER) using a skimmer AT A RESTAURANT! I’ve NEVER had my information stolen from an online transaction.

If you don’t understand how the technology works, then don’t pretend to understand how your personal information is secured. Online transactions are 100% safe. The caveat here is that the TRANSACTION is safe, meaning the back-and-forth of the data is secure. If you do business with a shady merchant or someone running a server in their basement, that’s on you.

I have 10 years in IT security, and I can tell you that a majority of the fraudulent card purchases that pass through our CUSO are due to physical access to the card in question. Data analytics prove that less than 10% of fraudulent activity on a card is due to online transactions with secure merchants (i.e. Amazon).


29 posted on 05/02/2014 11:11:07 AM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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