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10 Modern Technologies We Lived Without in Primitive, Pre-Millennial America
Pajamas Media ^ | 05/08/2014 | PAULA BOLYARD

Posted on 05/08/2014 8:12:05 AM PDT by SeekAndFind

While the 1970s are known for some terrifying fashions and the human indignity of the Disco Era, the decade (with some assists from the previous generation) also gave us some amazing technological advancements that many of us take for granted today. Here are ten that changed the world:

1. Microwave Ovens

1970 microwave

Before the 1970s, our only option for heating up leftover pizza was the conventional oven and we didn’t have the luxury of 4-minute microwave popcorn (gross as it is). Though the “Radarange” was first sold in the United States in 1947, it wasn’t until the ovens became affordable for the average family that “microwaves” became common in American homes (even if they didn’t live up to their promises of delicious layer cakes and scrumptious roasts in 30 minutes). In addition to the high prices, many Americans were afraid of radiation associated with microwave ovens. I remember my dad refusing to purchase what he called a “radar burger” at a concession stand in the early ’70s. In 1971, only 1% of households in the U.S. owned a microwave. By 1986, roughly 25% of households in the U.S. owned a microwave oven, with the number soaring to 90% of American households by 1997.

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2. Hair Dryers

The first American handheld hair dryer was patented in 1911, but they were heavy, weighing several pounds, and were often dangerous to use. Improvements in plastics and better electric motors in the 1960s led to more widespread use, and regulations by the Consumer Product Safety Commission made the dryers safer. Before handheld hair dryers were common in American homes, we sat under bonnet-style or rigid-helmet dryers — usually with our hair slathered with Dippity Do and wrapped around curlers.

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3. Cell Phones

Not only did pre-millennials live without cell phones, we lived without basic necessities like push-button phones. Ohio Bell (before the giant AT&T merger) used to charge more for “touchtone” phones than they did for the rotaries. If your friends had phone numbers with a lot of 8s or 9s you hoped you reached them on the first try so you wouldn’t have to go through that Herculean dialing effort again (no voice mail back then, either). We also didn’t have cordless phones and most families had one shared phone, usually located in the kitchen. If you were lucky, you had a super-long phone cord that would reach into another room (or the back porch) so you could have a modicum of privacy. After a few months of abuse, the stretched-out cord lay in a heap on the floor beneath the phone. Some families had “party lines” which means they shared a phone line with a neighbor. Of course, this meant that there was always a possibility that the neighbors would pick up when you were in the middle of an important call — or worse, that they were listening in the whole time. Nevertheless, it saved money and discouraged teenagers from loitering on the phone all day.

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4. TV Remote Controls

Believe it or not, there was a time when human beings had to stand up and walk across an entire room to change the channel or adjust the volume on a TV set. Of course, there were only three channels for us to choose from back then (unless we used that funny round antenna that would add two additional stations on UHF— the ones that offered Godzilla and other B-movies on Saturday afternoons). There were very primitive TV remote controls as far back as the 1950s, but they were usually limited to turning the TV on and off and they were not common — most TVs still had knobs for changing channels and adjusting volume. It wasn’t until the 1980s, when the advent of cable TV made them a necessity, that remote controls were included with every TV set and we were finally able to say goodbye to changing channels by turning the clunky knobs.

A legitimate case could be made that children were less obese back then because of those frequent walks back and forth from the TV.

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5. Personal Computers

In 1977, 48,000 computers were sold to Americans. That jumped to 125 million in 2001 and skyrocketed to 500 million personal computers in use in the United States in 2002. Prior to the common use of personal computers in the home, we labored away on typewriters, correcting errors with Wite-Out or by using mysterious erasable typing paper that relied on some sort of dark magic. Those of us who weren’t lucky enough to have an IBM Selectric electric typewriter banged out our high school papers on keys that required fingers of steel (and frequent breaks) and we fought with the inky Cloth Ribbons of Misery. The piles of crumpled-up papers under our desks testified to the hours of frustration that went into creating a presentable paper.

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6. Video Games

Home video games did not achieve widespread popularity until the release of a home version of Pong sold by Sears during the Christmas of 1975. Those of us who were lucky enough to receive one for Christmas that year hooked the primitive consoles up to our TV sets (often black and white TVs) and wasted entire days mesmerized by the back and forth ping pong action. We imagined that we were famous tennis stars chasing balls across the court while lying on the floor munching on bowls of Quisp and Cap’n Crunch. The success of Pong sparked hundreds of clones and eventually launched the modern video game industry.

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7. Digital Music

Not only did we not have digital music, we didn’t even have CDs. In order to listen to the music we wanted to hear we had two choices: we could drive (or get our parents to take us) to a record store to buy a record or a cassette (or an 8-track!), or we could sit in front of our transistor radios hoping to hear our favorite songs. Radio stations would often take requests, so we would spend hours trying to call our favorite stations hoping to get our songs some air time. The pre-millennial version of illegally downloading music was using a cassette recorder to tape songs from the radio. It was a tricky proposition, to be sure, never knowing when the song we wanted was going to come on, but we persevered and sometimes ended up with pretty good compilations of our favorite songs (until that blasted tape got all twisted up in the cassette casing and then required surgical intervention with pencils, screwdrivers, and, sometimes, Scotch Tape).

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lead

8. Lead-free Paint

Prior to 1977 when the Consumer Product Safety Commission banned it in residential and commercial properties, most paint contained lead. Though lead can cause nervous system damage, stunted growth, kidney damage, and delayed development in children, we ate the toxic paint chips because they tasted sweet and some kids couldn’t resist gnawing on window sills and picking up stray chips that peeled off of the porch railing.

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9. Pocket Calculators

In the mid-1960s calculators were large, heavy desktop machines that used hundreds of transistors on several circuit boards and required an AC power supply. By 1970, a calculator could be made using just a few microprocessor chips, opening the way for portable models powered with rechargeable batteries. The first portable calculator appeared in Japan in 1970 with integrated circuits that made the price and the size drop. They were soon marketed around the world. By the end of the 1970s the prices of calculators had reduced to a point where they were affordable to most Americans and we all began to use them regularly in our homes and schools.

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Typical-VCR-from-the-early-decade-of-the-1980s-generation

10. Video Cassette Recorders

In the 1970s and early 1980s we could have never imagined the concept of the DVD, let alone something as complex (and convenient) as streaming video. We went to movie theaters or waited for the movie of the week on ABC, NBC, or CBS if we wanted to see something other than a sitcom or a game show. The “modern” VCR did not begin to gain mass market traction until 1975 when the systems were standardized and movies became available to consumers. Of course, the “format war” between VHS and Betamax threatened to derail the whole thing, but VHS ultimately prevailed (the die hard Betamax fans eventually fell in line) and remained the top dog in the world of home entertainment until the technology was toppled by the success of DVDs. In addition to giving us the ability to watch movies we had rented or purchased, we suddenly had the ability to record television shows so we were no longer at the mercy of the programmers — and for the first time we could fast forward through the commercials, freeing us from having to sit through the unwelcomed messages in our homes.

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What other technological advancements do you appreciate?



TOPICS: Business/Economy; Science; Society
KEYWORDS: inventions; technology
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1 posted on 05/08/2014 8:12:05 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: rdb3; Calvinist_Dark_Lord; JosephW; Only1choice____Freedom; amigatec; Still Thinking; ...

2 posted on 05/08/2014 8:17:37 AM PDT by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
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To: SeekAndFind

air conditioning, indoor plumbing, washing machine and dryer, ball point pen, power tools, sneakers


3 posted on 05/08/2014 8:18:22 AM PDT by TexasFreeper2009 (Obama lied .. the economy died.)
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To: SeekAndFind

GPS see the website for my book
Www.gpsdeclassified.com


4 posted on 05/08/2014 8:18:28 AM PDT by Richard from IL
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To: SeekAndFind

My video game skills have not advanced beyong Pong and Space Invaders.


5 posted on 05/08/2014 8:18:46 AM PDT by FatherofFive (Islam is evil and must be eradicated)
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To: TexasFreeper2009

digital cameras (man I hated having to pay to have film developed)


6 posted on 05/08/2014 8:19:06 AM PDT by TexasFreeper2009 (Obama lied .. the economy died.)
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To: SeekAndFind
I love the Canon 21 Megapixel Digital Single Lens Reflex Camera I used to make this photograph!



Rocky Ramparts

7 posted on 05/08/2014 8:20:39 AM PDT by MeshugeMikey ( "Never, never, never give up". Winston Churchill)
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To: TexasFreeper2009

see above...


8 posted on 05/08/2014 8:21:00 AM PDT by MeshugeMikey ( "Never, never, never give up". Winston Churchill)
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To: SeekAndFind
Believe it or not, there was a time when human beings had to stand up and walk across an entire room to change the channel or adjust the volume on a TV set.

Not my dad. He had me!

9 posted on 05/08/2014 8:21:12 AM PDT by pgkdan
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To: FatherofFive

Ever since I was a young boy,
I’ve played the silver ball.
From Soho down to Brighton
I must have played them all.
But I ain’t seen nothing like him
In any amusement hall...
That deaf dumb and blind kid
Sure plays a mean pin ball !

He stands like a statue,
Becomes part of the machine.
Feeling all the bumpers
Always playing clean.
He plays by intuition,
The digit counters fall.
That deaf dumb and blind kid
Sure plays a mean pin ball !

He’s a pin ball wizard
There has got to be a twist.
A pin ball wizard,
S’got such a supple wrist.

‘How do you think he does it? I don’t know!
What makes him so good?’

He ain’t got no distractions
Can’t hear those buzzers and bells,
Don’t see lights a flashin’
Plays by sense of smell.
Always has a replay,
‘n’ never tilts at all...
That deaf dumb and blind kid
Sure plays a mean pin ball.

I thought I was
The Bally table king.
But I just handed
My pin ball crown to him.

Even on my favorite table
He can beat my best.
His disciples lead him in
And he just does the rest.
He’s got crazy flipper fingers
Never seen him fall...
That deaf dumb and blind kind
Sure plays a mean pin ball.!!!!!


10 posted on 05/08/2014 8:21:40 AM PDT by envisio (Its on like Donkey Kong!)
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To: SeekAndFind
fun stuff! i remember getting my first calculator when i was in the 5th grade... it was what i asked for for Christmas... my sister-in-law had a sister who worked for Texas Instruments, and she and my brother got it for me... the numbers lit up in pretty red...

i also remember recording favorite songs from the radio... the hard part was to end the recording before the deejay or a commercial came on...

11 posted on 05/08/2014 8:24:22 AM PDT by latina4dubya (when i have money i buy books... if i have anything left, i buy 6-inch heels and a bottle of wine...)
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To: pgkdan

Ha, not only did I have to get up to change channel... I had to grab the tinfoil that was wrapped around the rabbit ears and stand in an awkward pose for entire episodes of MASH.


12 posted on 05/08/2014 8:25:00 AM PDT by envisio (Its on like Donkey Kong!)
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To: latina4dubya

RE: the hard part was to end the recording before the deejay or a commercial came on...

The annoying part is ALWAYS this — The DJ talks over the song as it is about to end.


13 posted on 05/08/2014 8:26:20 AM PDT by SeekAndFind (If at first you don't succeed, put it out for beta test.)
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To: pgkdan

Me too! Adjusted the rabbit ears, as well. My Dad thought I was mouthing off once, when I asked “who changes the channel, after my bedtime?”.


14 posted on 05/08/2014 8:26:56 AM PDT by jttpwalsh
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To: SeekAndFind
annoying part is ALWAYS this — The DJ talks over the song as it is about to end.

yeah--they did it on purpose...

15 posted on 05/08/2014 8:28:28 AM PDT by latina4dubya (when i have money i buy books... if i have anything left, i buy 6-inch heels and a bottle of wine...)
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To: SeekAndFind

Thanks! I am old enough that this is quite relevant to me.

I think it was 1975 when my grandfather purchased an early Texas Instruments calculator. Just the most basic of functions (add, subtract, multiply, divide). I think he paid around $300 for it.

My dad was in the Air Force stationed at a radar facility along the Gulf Coast. He told me how seagulls used to come swooping in off the gulf, fly too close to the towers, and immediately drop to the ground. An hour later they’d still be sizzling on the inside. I pointed out that he had missed his chance to invent the microwave oven.

I recently disposed of a non-remote television set I had purchased in 1991. And it was my primary set well into this century. It was obsolete even when purchased, but having grown up with such sets I thought paying extra for the remote was a waste. Thought about trying to get it fixed, but when Pennsylvania banned old TV’s from landfills I was afraid I might get stuck with it forever.

I got a TI-99 computer one year for Christmas. After spending 6 1/2 hours writing hundreds of lines of Basic code to accomplish something I could have done with a pencil in 60 seconds, I decided “it will never catch on!” and pushed it to the back of the closet. Total lack of foresight on my part.

Ahh, Pong! My brother and I spent hours on the display model at Sears. My dad thought it was stupid and refused to buy one.

Worked Christmas of ‘85 in an electronics store. The first really big Christmas for VCR’s. Sold over 300 units myself between Thanksgiving and Christmas Eve. They ran about $350. On a really good sale you could pick one up for $299.
Low-end individual cassettes went for about five bucks apiece.

When my cell carrier tries to upgrade me I tell them thank you, but I am perfectly happy living in the 80’s.

Though I refuse to believe that women EVER went without hair dryers.


16 posted on 05/08/2014 8:30:06 AM PDT by Buckeye McFrog
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To: SeekAndFind

RE: Rotary phones.

They were ‘real’ fun when radio stations did that “be the 7th caller and win” contests.


17 posted on 05/08/2014 8:30:15 AM PDT by TomGuy
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To: SeekAndFind

We got an Amana Radarange in 1976. Three buttons, two twist knobs, no turn tray. Top of the line.


18 posted on 05/08/2014 8:31:12 AM PDT by Hoffer Rand (Bear His image. Bring His message. Be the Church.)
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To: SeekAndFind

Of all those, the modern “smart phone” as exemplified by the original iPhone and all it’s imitators, has been the most disruptive. That can be good or that can be bad.

Dropping land line phone typically more than offsets the cost of the cell plan unless you’re heavily into texting and downloading videos and such, which usually is due to teens on the plan. There’s a decent camera and video recording system in the phone, a calculator, basic and even full versions of business software, internet connectivity, GPS, it’s become a fairly indispensable device if all or even most of the capabilities present in the device are used.

I can foresee a day in the not too distant future, when “computer” and “camera” cease to mean anything to the average person beyond their cell phone.


19 posted on 05/08/2014 8:31:30 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: SeekAndFind

Besides all of the above, there was actually a time when cars didn’t all have air conditioning, power windows and locks, and/or remote entry key fobs with alarms.

In the distant past, “alloy” wheels on cars were often not even an option and certainly not common and many cars had 14” wheels with 15” reserved for large cars and full size pickups. 17” wheels were a relic from the 30s.

Remember overhead projectors and filmstrip projectors?

How about chalk and chalkboards, and those special chalk holders the teachers could use to draw lines on the board to teach penmanship (back when that subject was taught).


20 posted on 05/08/2014 8:32:20 AM PDT by chrisser (Senseless legislation does nothing to solve senseless violence.)
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To: SeekAndFind
How times have changed... I still think of VCR’s and VHS tapes as “modern technology”, but my niece who is 8 years old was over at my house and found a box of VHS tapes in the garage. She had never seen one before and didn't have the slightest idea what they were, when I tried to explain, she just looked at me strange and said “Why didn't you just watch those movies on Netflix?”
21 posted on 05/08/2014 8:42:21 AM PDT by apillar
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To: chrisser
Besides all of the above, there was actually a time when cars didn’t all have air conditioning, power windows and locks, and/or remote entry key fobs with alarms.

My first car was a 1971 Pontiac. No AC. Had those little triangular shaped vent windows up front. No carpeting, just black rubber material like a truck interior. No emission controls. Meaning I could actually work on it without first having to remove 600 miles of cable and tubing. Crank windows and key locks. AM radio. My first major upgrade was installing an FM converter.

And I was damned happy to have it.


22 posted on 05/08/2014 8:43:16 AM PDT by Buckeye McFrog
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To: pgkdan

ditto


23 posted on 05/08/2014 8:48:54 AM PDT by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: SeekAndFind

How about the evolution of ski equipment - remember cubco bindings and leather boots and 6 foot skis?

How about photography, from kodachrome to digital in just a few decades - amazing.


24 posted on 05/08/2014 8:54:18 AM PDT by 1Old Pro
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To: 1Old Pro

TV’s

Just 10 years ago a state of the art Sony 30 inch weighed 200 pounds - now a 50 inch weighs 30 pounds and can be hung on a wall with incredible hdtv


25 posted on 05/08/2014 8:56:19 AM PDT by 1Old Pro
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To: 1Old Pro

The most amazing change since the early 80’s has to be the internet, thanks to algor


26 posted on 05/08/2014 8:57:03 AM PDT by 1Old Pro
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To: Buckeye McFrog
I got a TI-99 computer one year for Christmas.

If you still have it, might be worth some money.

27 posted on 05/08/2014 9:00:43 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: Buckeye McFrog

If you think about it, air conditioned vehicles make all the annoying cell phone blabbering while driving possible. Ever tried talking on a cell in a moving vehicle with the windows down? Inaudible on either end of the conversation. Would people sit in the heat in their cars blabbing, in traffic or in their own driveways? Doubt it.


28 posted on 05/08/2014 9:03:19 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: envisio

me too!


29 posted on 05/08/2014 9:04:48 AM PDT by pgkdan
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To: SeekAndFind

What about the button on the car floor to turn on the headlights?


30 posted on 05/08/2014 9:07:16 AM PDT by P.O.E. (Pray for America)
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To: P.O.E.

I meant to say high beams


31 posted on 05/08/2014 9:07:46 AM PDT by P.O.E. (Pray for America)
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To: 1Old Pro

I didn’t even have Cubcos! My first bindings were the “bear trap” type.


32 posted on 05/08/2014 9:08:03 AM PDT by SkiKnee
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To: SeekAndFind

Copy machine

Fax machine


33 posted on 05/08/2014 9:08:12 AM PDT by truth_seeker
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To: truth_seeker

I’m just barely old enough to have been exposed to the stress fax machines caused in the office ... “we’ve lost a whole day, everything’s moving too fast!” lol. Same with FedEx overnight. Little did they know.


34 posted on 05/08/2014 9:12:35 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: TexasFreeper2009

Almost the whole history of mankind was without electricity. That’s amazing when you really think about it.....


35 posted on 05/08/2014 9:12:43 AM PDT by kjam22 (my music video "If My People" at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=74b20RjILy4)
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To: SeekAndFind
Mankind has had the wheel for ten thousand years. Mankind has had luggage since somebody first sewed a sack together out of an animal hide. So tell me this:

WHY DID NOBODY THINK OF PUTTING WHEELS ON LUGGAGE??!?

(Sound of hyperventilating)

36 posted on 05/08/2014 9:15:06 AM PDT by Billthedrill
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To: Buckeye McFrog

I bought a ‘70 Hemi Cuda in ‘71 when I returned from Vietnam...
Here is a 426 CI engine sitting in a small car and you could raise the hood and still see pavement beside the engine block...
Today, you could get a huge Cadillac with a 6 cylinder engine and not be able to see anything but cables, hoses, wires, and filters under the hood.


37 posted on 05/08/2014 9:15:20 AM PDT by Boonie
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To: SeekAndFind
"White Privilege"

How did we ever live without it?

38 posted on 05/08/2014 9:15:38 AM PDT by Dagnabitt (Amnesty is Treason. Its agents are Traitors.)
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To: Buckeye McFrog
"My first car was a 1971 Pontiac. No AC. "

We used to call that AC the 255 model. Two windows down and going 55 miles an hour....
39 posted on 05/08/2014 9:21:07 AM PDT by Old Teufel Hunden
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To: SeekAndFind

Okay, I can’t have been the only kid to have to climb up on the roof of the house to adjust the TV antenna when it got stuck as Dad was down on the ground telling me if it was good.


40 posted on 05/08/2014 9:24:28 AM PDT by Old Teufel Hunden
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To: SeekAndFind
The annoying part is ALWAYS this — The DJ talks over the song as it is about to end.

That drove me up the wall too. BTW, I still use VHS tape and a 1982 Zenith TV with rabbit ears.
41 posted on 05/08/2014 9:25:09 AM PDT by Nowhere Man (Mom I miss you! (8-20-1938 to 11-18-2013) Cancer sucks)
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To: SeekAndFind

I kind of miss those vacuum tube testers at the grocery and hardware stores.


42 posted on 05/08/2014 9:25:42 AM PDT by fruser1
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To: Buckeye McFrog
I recently disposed of a non-remote television set I had purchased in 1991. And it was my primary set well into this century. It was obsolete even when purchased, but having grown up with such sets I thought paying extra for the remote was a waste. Thought about trying to get it fixed, but when Pennsylvania banned old TV’s from landfills I was afraid I might get stuck with it forever.

I still use a 1982 Zenith TV with rabbit ears (and digital converter) along with VHS tape. It does have remote control. Just before Mom passed away just before Thanksgiving, we did find the original bill of sale, April 4th, 1983. It was on clearance, being a 1982 model and it had a remote. The similar 1983 model did not and was a $100 more so we got the clearance model instead. Plus it was cable ready.

I got a TI-99 computer one year for Christmas. After spending 6 1/2 hours writing hundreds of lines of Basic code to accomplish something I could have done with a pencil in 60 seconds, I decided “it will never catch on!” and pushed it to the back of the closet. Total lack of foresight on my part.

The TI-99/4A was my first computer too, got it in 1982 for Christmas. It was a fun machine though and with Extended BASIC, was a great machine. I remember typing in "OLD CS1" and loading programs from tape. I still have it too.
43 posted on 05/08/2014 9:31:14 AM PDT by Nowhere Man (Mom I miss you! (8-20-1938 to 11-18-2013) Cancer sucks)
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To: chrisser
Remember overhead projectors and filmstrip projectors?

I rmemeber those. "At the beep/bell," turn the knob to the next frame. Usually the audio was from a record or a cassette tape.

How about chalk and chalkboards, and those special chalk holders the teachers could use to draw lines on the board to teach penmanship (back when that subject was taught).

I think they use "white boards" with markers now although in the early 1980's we have small versions of those.

44 posted on 05/08/2014 9:34:17 AM PDT by Nowhere Man (Mom I miss you! (8-20-1938 to 11-18-2013) Cancer sucks)
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To: Billthedrill
WHY DID NOBODY THINK OF PUTTING WHEELS ON LUGGAGE??!?

Because they didn't have to rush from Terminal 12 to Terminal 23 in 7 minutes because of a last minute change in flight numbers.
45 posted on 05/08/2014 9:44:46 AM PDT by TomGuy
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To: P.O.E.
What about the button on the car floor to turn on the headlights?

We had an old car with a standard (4 on the tree) transmission. If my left foot wasn't all the way on the clutch pedal, I would occasionally hit the high beams while shifting gears.

46 posted on 05/08/2014 9:49:00 AM PDT by Disambiguator
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To: TomGuy
RE: Rotary phones. They were ‘real’ fun when radio stations did that “be the 7th caller and win” contests.

With no "Auto Dialers" (and probably before Dual-tone multi-frequency signaling was introduced in 1963 by the globes most fantastic telephone company AT&T)
47 posted on 05/08/2014 9:55:13 AM PDT by Cheerio (Barry Hussein Soetoro-0bama=The Complete Destruction of American Capitalism)
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To: pgkdan

There was no such thing as TV when I was a kid.


48 posted on 05/08/2014 9:55:23 AM PDT by dalereed
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To: chrisser
Besides all of the above, there was actually a time when cars didn’t all have air conditioning, power windows and locks, and/or remote entry key fobs with alarms.

I just bought a truck with none of that stuff. A Unimog.

We got electricity and running water and phone (12 party line) when I was 6.

Got electricity at the one room school I went to when I was 7, running water when I was 10, the selectmen never did waste taxpayer money on a phone in the school.

49 posted on 05/08/2014 9:56:52 AM PDT by Mogger (Independence, better fuel economy and performance with American made synthetic oil.)
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To: Billthedrill

Wheels on luggage. One of the inventions that made men obsolete.


50 posted on 05/08/2014 10:05:04 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
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