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Anyone ever hire home health care aids?
5/14/2014 | Vanity

Posted on 05/14/2014 2:53:35 PM PDT by grayhog

Hi All ,

We're moving my mother home from a nursing home and am in the process if hiring care for her. We need 24 hour live in, though mom sleeps through the night. She is immobile, hoyer lift needed. In talking with willing applicants, it seems they need to shift her every 2 hours. Because of that, the care required is more involved. The quote I'm getting is $375 a day. That adds up to $136k per year?! Does that seem right? Any thoughts from my Freeper friends much appreciated.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Chit/Chat; Health/Medicine
KEYWORDS: alzheimers; healthcare; seniorcare
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1 posted on 05/14/2014 2:53:35 PM PDT by grayhog
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To: grayhog

Around here you pay $10/hr for an individual to come sit, using an agency will cost more than that. The agency makes money, the employee must be paid, then add in insurance and you are getting up there in price.


2 posted on 05/14/2014 2:58:00 PM PDT by tioga (WFTD...be there or be square.)
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To: grayhog

I’m sympathetic to your trouble. I, too, have recently been in this mess. My “local” Visiting Angels wanted about 22 hundred every two weeks for around the clock. My mother, eventually, went right into a nursing home. I’m in the northeast. At the time, I was willing to pay it.


3 posted on 05/14/2014 2:59:26 PM PDT by miss marmelstein (Richard Lives Yet!)
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To: grayhog

3 people making $20/hr for a year is 40K each or 120K total and then the agency fees

If this is coming out of your own pocket you can find much cheaper if you hire direct but keep in mind what you are asking- dependable medical help


4 posted on 05/14/2014 3:00:15 PM PDT by Mr. K (If you like your constitution, you can keep it...Period. PALIN/CRUZ 2016)
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To: grayhog

Yes, they steal.


5 posted on 05/14/2014 3:01:36 PM PDT by Chickensoup (Leftist totalitarian fascism is on the move.)
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To: grayhog

When my grandmother was recovering from a broken hip on two occasions, we paid a trusted cousin of my mother to be with her part time each day. It wasn’t much.

When my great uncle died, three ladies helped, taking turns around the clock. I believe that came to $60,000 - $70,000 a year, in all. But it was a small town and that made it easier to find help.


6 posted on 05/14/2014 3:03:05 PM PDT by ConservativeMind ("Humane" = "Don't pen up pets or eat meat, but allow infanticide, abortion, and euthanasia.")
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To: grayhog

If you belong to a church see if a retired nurse or aid would be available.


7 posted on 05/14/2014 3:04:21 PM PDT by Chickensoup (Leftist totalitarian fascism is on the move.)
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To: grayhog

Maybe you should check out a long-term care facility.

You could also check with a service like “A Place for Mom”, where they can give you all the info regarding several choices of service; depending on the budget and the type of service needed.

Good luck.


8 posted on 05/14/2014 3:04:33 PM PDT by CyberAnt (True the Vote: MY AMERICA, "... I'm terrified it's slipping away.")
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To: grayhog

FIL, age 94, is in hospice care at home, his wife is 84 and in pre-hospice, also at home.


9 posted on 05/14/2014 3:04:58 PM PDT by Las Vegas Dave (The democRATic party preys on the ignorant..!)
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To: grayhog
why do they say they have to lift her every 2hrs? prevent bedsores??? this is what i used for my Mom when she was dying Featured Items
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$175.00

10 posted on 05/14/2014 3:10:09 PM PDT by Chode (Stand UP and Be Counted, or line up and be numbered - *DTOM* -vvv- NO Pity for the LAZY - 86-44)
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To: tioga

One we used robbed us blind—walked out before we could report her.


11 posted on 05/14/2014 3:12:58 PM PDT by Forward the Light Brigade (Into the Jaws of H*ll)
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To: Chode

I’ll look into this, thanks


12 posted on 05/14/2014 3:13:59 PM PDT by grayhog
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To: grayhog

Unless this is a temporary condition and they are still young 60 to 70s years old,keeping them at home may not be the best choice. Nursing home or assisted living or rehab hospital will cost $3500 to $4500 a month in the Dallas market. The facilities are really better, they have fellow folks to talk with,hourly programs to keep their brains and bodies in shape. We tried to keep both my parents in their home. They both fell, broke hips and ended up in assisted living, nursing and finally memory care and died under hospice care of alzheimer’s. Keeping them at home longer than they were capable even with help was the wrong choice in hindsight. I think we used a company like “visiting angels” and paid $15 to $18 an hour. If you need 24 hour care unless you’re very rich the facility vs hourly care is more economical. Gods speed!


13 posted on 05/14/2014 3:14:51 PM PDT by pwatson
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To: grayhog

My former boss had to hire hospice care at home for his wife. He thought he would save money that way. He was wrong.

I know most people don’t like to put a loved one in a nursing facility, but while we always hear about unscrupulous operators, neglect and abuse, there are many which give excellent care and you don’t hear about them. My mother was in a home operated by an order of nuns. She was well cared for — a lot better care than she would have received at home.

Is there any insurance coverage for home health care? It might help.


14 posted on 05/14/2014 3:15:07 PM PDT by fatnotlazy
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To: grayhog

Be careful. Set up hidden cameras. My uncle had hire a company to help his wife some 10+ years ago and some of them rifled thru their belongings.


15 posted on 05/14/2014 3:15:44 PM PDT by minnesota_bound
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To: grayhog
I sympathize. My parents have 8 hrs of care 7 days a week. While some caregivers at the company they're using are very good others are terrible but all cost $25/hr. And my folks will need 24 hr care very soon.

I'm interviewing provider tonight who is non-affiliated with a company, so we'll see what the cost difference is.

16 posted on 05/14/2014 3:16:04 PM PDT by skeeter
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To: grayhog

That’s $15 and hour. Not unreasonable. It also requires 2-3 shift of people working in unison, which means you need an agency. If you can’t pay that amount, then cut it to just the hours she’s awake, and you sit with her the rest of the time.

This is usually when Hospice cares steps in with Medicare/Medicaid. If you don’t have a social worker on the case, then contact hospice care and get one. You’ll need med’s and constant care, and winging that when you know nothing about it or who/what’s available is problematic.


17 posted on 05/14/2014 3:16:16 PM PDT by JFoobar
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To: grayhog
they are interlocking bubbles that 1/2inflate and 1/2deflate on a timer to help prevent bedsores
18 posted on 05/14/2014 3:20:38 PM PDT by Chode (Stand UP and Be Counted, or line up and be numbered - *DTOM* -vvv- NO Pity for the LAZY - 86-44)
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To: grayhog

Does she have supplemental or health insurance beside Medicare? They may be able to pay at least part of the expenses.


19 posted on 05/14/2014 3:29:27 PM PDT by notpoliticallycorewrecked (The more I know, the more I realize that how much more there is to learn.)
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To: grayhog

When my mom was alive, she was a certified nurse’s aid who ran her own ad in the “Jobs Wanted” section of our local paper. She sat with the elderly often and took care of most of their needs that didn’t require a hospital or a doctor.

You might try that route (look in the classifieds), but make sure you get references.

When my mom finally fell ill and required hospice, we got a list of sitters. We found one who would sit with her during the day (while I was at work), and I would see to her at night. We had her come to the house, mom and I interviewed her and hired her. It was about $10 an hour back then for 4-5hrs a day/5 days a week. Friends and family filled in the gaps.

You might also check with some friends and co-workers who may be or have been in a similar situation.


20 posted on 05/14/2014 3:37:22 PM PDT by Mrite
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To: tioga

My sister does home health care for the same price you mentioned, and she is very good at it. Sis has been trained and worked for a local nursing home in the past. It’s not just the money, she enjoys the company of those with stories to tell about the good old days.


21 posted on 05/14/2014 3:38:48 PM PDT by neal1960 (D m cr ts S ck. Would you like to buy a vowel?)
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To: grayhog

Let me also put in a huge plug for hospice care.
Hospice took over the care of my parents, and they became the case managers were paid for by medicare and were the most kind, loving, religious, wonderful people i have ever worked with. Your parents do not have to be at end of life, just running down and with in a year or two of possible death. The nursing homes and doctors had them on to many drugs that often interfere with each other. For instance it was keeping my dad up all night and had him sleeping during the day. The Hospice nurse fixed all of that knew exactly the right things to use and involved me in 100% of the decisions. Hospice even sent in a social worker and a visiting pastor who were just wonderful. Let me tell you for both my parents, myself and my family, hospice allowed me to give my parents the dignified end of life quality of life they deserved. It also allowed me to keep my job, deal with my Autistic daughter, my marriage and my own emotional baggage of watching my mom and dad waste away and lose their brilliant minds with alzheimer’s. The people who work for Hospice do it as a career choice because they care. For several years I did all of this care myself, ran over every day at lunch, many nights and weekends. You can only do that for so long before it takes its toll on you personally and your family and career.


22 posted on 05/14/2014 3:39:01 PM PDT by pwatson
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To: grayhog

Nursing home is always cheaper and the care is better. It sucks but it is better.
My mom’s in-home care slept through the call button that brought EMS


23 posted on 05/14/2014 3:42:10 PM PDT by AppyPappy
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To: grayhog
Make sure you have one of these in a few rooms.
24 posted on 05/14/2014 3:44:11 PM PDT by Pharmboy (Democrats lie because they must.)
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To: grayhog

It is all terrible for everyone. Modern Medicine... what has it done to us? We once died peacefully at home or in the hospital after a short but terminal illness. Now, with the aid of the “best care money can buy” we struggle out losing our mobility, freedom, faculties and often our dignity in the process.

On average, we live no longer than most of the rest of the modern world but we spend a whole lot more money doing it.

In my family we go through the same things the other FReepers here describe. Can’t find help, costs a fortune, we can’t drop our work and go take care of ________ ourselves, constant worry and strain from one crisis to the other, good days and bad days but increasing numbers of bad days and on and on. I think we are lucky. We found a competent and apparently caring place near my sis for Mom to go to. It isn’t home but it is the best we could do. It sure isn’t what Dad wanted or what I promised him but I didn’t know the price of the promise when I made it. It tears me up for failing him.

I hope I am somehow blessed as an old family friend was. He went out to feed and check on his cows. Took his cow dog with him. They didn’t come home at the usual time. Went out to the farm and found him leaning up against the wheel on his truck with his dog beside him. He was dead. Apparently got out of the truck, fed, felt bad, sat on the ground leaning up against the truck and died. I want to die in the field with my boots on but don’t bury me in Texas! Please take me back to Oklahoma.


25 posted on 05/14/2014 3:44:58 PM PDT by Sequoyah101
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To: grayhog

First of all, I offer my sympathy to you. I have been dealing with the same thing. After my Mom passed, my Dad (age 96) wanted to live at an assisted living facility. That worked very well for for about two years......until he developed dementia. They could no longer keep him, but he wasn’t quite ready for a nursing home.

We built an apartment in our walk-out basement for him and brought him home. Yes, he is a handful. But he still is able to shower, feed and toilet himself. He is paranoid, cranky, delusional, wanders about and needs someone to check on him.

I am up and down the stairs a dozen times a day with his food, pills, snacks and just tending to him.

My husband and I spend a couple of months a year in Arizona and I have a wonderful neighbor (retired nurse) who comes to check on him three times a day while we are gone. She does his meds, light cleaning, laundry, amd visits with him. I pay her $200 per week. I consider it a real bargain.

He is beginning to fail quite rapidly now and I know that a nursing home is coming shortly. I’m over 70 and have my own health issues, but I love him dearly and will keep him here as long as I can. My husband has been a tremendous help and support. I couldn’t do it without him.

Good luck. I know how difficult it can be.


26 posted on 05/14/2014 3:46:41 PM PDT by Rushmore Rocks
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To: grayhog

I agree with others, it may be better to put her in some sort of facility. I know with my MIL we had people who just didn’t do what they were supposed to do and if we had been able to be there with her to be sure they did their job then we wouldn’t have needed them in the first place.

She’s in an assisted living home now and it is wonderful, we don’t have to worry about her.


27 posted on 05/14/2014 3:50:07 PM PDT by tiki
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To: pwatson; grayhog

I’ll echo this. The facility is better equipped to handle geriatrics than you can do it at home.

We have been very fortunate that the manager at the assisted living facility is a Saint in my book. We are also very blessed that my sis is also being nominated for Saint hood since she goes to see Mom at least three times a week and calls her faithfully every night at 8PM. Mom wants for nothing but she complains about almost everything and seems to appreciate nothing most days.


28 posted on 05/14/2014 3:50:23 PM PDT by Sequoyah101
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To: grayhog

we hired a trusted cousin who needed a job. we fill in when we can.


29 posted on 05/14/2014 4:00:14 PM PDT by dadfly
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To: grayhog

grayhog,I’m glad you posted this as I’m presently going through the same thing with my 96 year old mother. Had visiting Angels with here for most of 2013 did a great job they said they would give me a special rate for 24 hours at $260/hr the only problem is the Visiting Angels were non medical folks so they couldn’t do here meds. There are other complications but it appears that we are going to be faced with hiring a live in nurse. Good luck to you I know it’s not easy. Prayers up.


30 posted on 05/14/2014 4:02:02 PM PDT by Rappini (Veritas vos Liberabit)
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To: Chode
The Alternating Pressure Pads aren't that great especially for someone who requires to be turned. They really aren't comfortable either. Plus they hold in heat which is something you do not want.

A Low Air Loss Mattress is much better. My wife uses one and her doctor that treated her pressure sores recommended it. They do cost more. Some insurers will pay some want and if the person is Diabetic I understand it makes the approval process easier. My wife uses one due to quadriplegia. They are roughly $1000. But they save thousands of dollars in doctor bills. One pressure sore treatment can run in the thousands of dollars real fast.

31 posted on 05/14/2014 4:09:23 PM PDT by cva66snipe ((Two Choices left for U.S. One Nation Under GOD or One Nation Under Judgment? Which one say ye?))
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To: grayhog

Have you looked into Residential Care Homes for the Elderly (RCFEs), aka “care homes” or “board and care”? Around here they charge appx $5K per month for the type of care you describe; in larger cities can go to $10K/month. My mother required turning to avoid bed sores and this type of facility worked out great for her.


32 posted on 05/14/2014 4:10:20 PM PDT by whinecountry (Semper Ubi Sub Ubi)
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To: cva66snipe
i don't know from long term, my Mom was terminal and didn't last three months and the one we had was much better than not having one... but this was 25 years ago so i hope things have improved since then

i hope the best for you and your wife, prayers up

33 posted on 05/14/2014 4:18:36 PM PDT by Chode (Stand UP and Be Counted, or line up and be numbered - *DTOM* -vvv- NO Pity for the LAZY - 86-44)
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To: grayhog
Is the nursing home she is in now close to you? If yes ask the ones who work with her if they would like to sit with her. Chances are one of them needs the extra money because nursing homes pay nursing assistants poorly.

Don't be afraid to learn some of the skills she needs yourself. I worked in a nursing home but had absolutely no patient care experience or training. I was a maintenance mechanic. I met a CNA working there and on a date she became a quad and after we married I became her husband & caregiver. That was 29 years ago. I learned to do the care by our co-workers & friends training me and the hospital also taught me a lot before she came home. Plus my wife know enough to talk me through things I wasn't sure about because she had done them before.

In 29 years we've used Home Health maybe 24 total visits. The nurses show me once or twice and I take it from there. I also did most of my dads Hospice with my mom and nieces help.

Some people can do a family members home care and some can't. It's not a personal failure if a person can't handle it emotionally or knowledge wise. But it is good to have skilled knowledge you can access 24/7 if you do meaning a nurse on call.

34 posted on 05/14/2014 4:25:32 PM PDT by cva66snipe ((Two Choices left for U.S. One Nation Under GOD or One Nation Under Judgment? Which one say ye?))
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To: Chode
Thanks.

Yea the big improvement is the low air loss mattress. It stems from a technology they developed about 25 years ago from what was called a Kinetic Mattress which in about 1988 cost tens of thousands of dollars. It's as thick as a hospital bed mattress {replaces it actually} and has huge chambers the air circulates through. Plus it is fully adjustable. Most Alternating Pressure Pads are pre set to hard as river rocks. The Low Air Loss matrass can also handle a lot more abuse. My wife sleeps with our Toy Ratty. On the Alternating Pressure Pad the dog would have busted it.

Really my wife's sore wasn't that bad till I put her on an alternating pressure pad. The vinyl holds in heat and breaks down the skin plus can incubate undesirable bacteria.

35 posted on 05/14/2014 4:34:54 PM PDT by cva66snipe ((Two Choices left for U.S. One Nation Under GOD or One Nation Under Judgment? Which one say ye?))
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To: Chode; grayhog

We had something like the Xcell for my dad. And a hospice worker provided by Medicare. It was 3 days a week for a couple hours a day. They bathed, turned, etc.

The rest of the time I was fortunate to be able to move in for a while and help out. He was at least capable of getting up and into a wheelchair so the bedsore problem was limited.

What about looking for a qualified individual, rather than a company, willing to live for just room and board?


36 posted on 05/14/2014 4:42:59 PM PDT by Fledermaus (Conservatives are all that's left to defend the Constitution. Dems hate it, and Repubs don't care.)
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To: Rushmore Rocks
First of all, I offer my sympathy to you. I have been dealing with the same thing. After my Mom passed, my Dad (age 96) wanted to live at an assisted living facility. That worked very well for for about two years......until he developed dementia. They could no longer keep him, but he wasn’t quite ready for a nursing home.

There is assisted living for Memory Care if you need it because he starts to walk off. My sister is 62 and has Dementia. She spent almost three years in Memory Care assisted living. Simply means they have keypad security system so they can't walk off. Her condition since last Thanksgiving got worse and falls were sometimes a multi times a day event so a couple months ago we put her in a nursing home. They can do things assisted living can't like passive restraints and you get certified help. She's had two falls now in three months a huge improvement fall wise but her mental state seems to be on a rapid decline now.

37 posted on 05/14/2014 4:43:55 PM PDT by cva66snipe ((Two Choices left for U.S. One Nation Under GOD or One Nation Under Judgment? Which one say ye?))
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To: Fledermaus
hospicare provided the mattress, bed, aide and drugs, i can't say enough good things about hospicare
38 posted on 05/14/2014 4:49:09 PM PDT by Chode (Stand UP and Be Counted, or line up and be numbered - *DTOM* -vvv- NO Pity for the LAZY - 86-44)
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To: Chode
hospicare provided the mattress, bed, aide and drugs, i can't say enough good things about hospicare

I can't either really. My dad was terminal with cancer. We had a choice of facility hospice or home hospice. We chose home hospice. I had to call them several times in the middle of the night for things like stepping up pain meds. All medications were delivered and I dispensed them, a nurse and a CNA, as well as a Chaplain, and caseworker came out several times a week usually every other day as far as nurse and CNA went.

When dad passed they were there within minutes. They called the funeral home we designated and they called all the rental equipment providers etc and they got in and out fast taking down the equipment. The Chaplain and a neighbor who is a preacher did his service. Hospice helps even after the person has passed. They are also there to tell you what you need to do etc.

39 posted on 05/14/2014 4:58:23 PM PDT by cva66snipe ((Two Choices left for U.S. One Nation Under GOD or One Nation Under Judgment? Which one say ye?))
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To: cva66snipe
100%... they made it so my Mom could die in her own home with love care and dignity
40 posted on 05/14/2014 5:11:13 PM PDT by Chode (Stand UP and Be Counted, or line up and be numbered - *DTOM* -vvv- NO Pity for the LAZY - 86-44)
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To: Sequoyah101

Your first paragraph nails it.

On a whole I see the government-sponored medical-industrial complex as a sector of the economy that preys upon basic human anxieties over sickness, pain, injury and death.

I hope to not ever see another doctor in my life.


41 posted on 05/14/2014 6:15:43 PM PDT by Rodamala
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To: grayhog

Lock up the valuables...and keep a close watch on the checks you write.
..


42 posted on 05/14/2014 6:16:02 PM PDT by patriot08 (NATIVE TEXAN (girl type))
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To: Rodamala

I think you’ll stay healthier.

An ER doc once told me the reason he chose that speciality after he did his clinics in med school, “Most young people that get sick recover even without a doctor, old people die when their time comes and nothing you try to do can stop that and I can help hurt people.”


43 posted on 05/14/2014 6:40:36 PM PDT by Sequoyah101
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To: grayhog

Yes. Took care of both mom and dad. Mom after hip replacement surgery was put in a rehab facility and promptly over dosed on oxycontin until she was looney. Then they worked up (the “staff” moron doctor did) an alzheimer’s diagnosis based on her drug reaction. We got her home for home care and to wean her off the oxycontin. Rate then (this was 2005) was 17/hour, with certified sitters at night, skilled nursing in the day.
Became impossible financially. Once weaned and back to normal with limitations, we placed mom in Assisted Living and she loved it, then gradually fading, moved “down the hall” to full nursing. All of this was much less than home care.

Word to the wise: take out everything of value in the home, all the silver, collectibles, spoons, gold, coins collections.... whatever. The people are bonded— but they steal. We caught two (both of them Indian women from India) on their hands and knees picking up a secreted silver serving spoon we had “lost”. Swore out a warrant on them and demanded a full refund for their entire time paid... and got it.

It is tough to care for our loved ones with the goal of comfort and personal dignity. Hope this has helped. Go with Assisted Living if possible, first. Never hospice at home, and only hospice facility if there is pain (as in terminal cancer), because they will push morphine on any patient, who will then no longer be hungry and will simply starve and dehydrate to death (from the morphine). Morphine is fine if terminal cancer or pain, but naught else. Also, keep in mind that the decision for hospice puts your loved one in the care of the hospice physician (no longer any personal physician involved— legally is detached from the care).


44 posted on 05/14/2014 7:14:07 PM PDT by John S Mosby (Sic Semper Tyrannis)
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To: grayhog

In my area, NC, elder sitters go for about $20 an hour. Close to $500 a 24 hour day.

Found that out with my mother recently.


45 posted on 05/14/2014 7:45:25 PM PDT by moovova
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To: grayhog

HECK!!! That’s about what I make. Do you pay under the table?

That is absolutely ridiculous.

My prayers for you mum and God bless you for being so dedicated and caring for her. She is a blessed woman and has a fantastic family.


46 posted on 05/14/2014 8:07:28 PM PDT by Organic Panic
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To: John S Mosby
You are only partially right about hospice. To begin hospice is for terminally ill patients. I am a in home hospice patient, and cannot say enough good about them. They make sure that I have everything that I need, and listen to me, and consult with the doctor. They have NEVER forced or even pushed any drugs. Morphine is used for other than pain. I have a rare lung disease. No pain, but shortness of breath. Keeps me from smothering to death.
47 posted on 05/14/2014 8:09:39 PM PDT by Coldwater Creek
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To: grayhog

Hello everyone. In regards to my previous post. I am a highly skilled engineer with a full manufacturing facility to back me up. If there is something any of you that can imagine that will help care for our elderly loved ones let me know. It seems ridiculously expensive that it is going to cost so much for someone to “turn” their loved ones. Heck. When I am that infirmed I’ll strap myself in to one of my CNC machines and program it to take care of all my needs.

This is a serious offer from a serious manufacturer. It may seem callous and cold but technology is a wonderful thing.


48 posted on 05/14/2014 8:11:30 PM PDT by Organic Panic
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To: Sequoyah101
I think you’ll stay healthier.

Yeah, and the bonus feature of my health care program is that I might keep my guns a little while longer too.

As far as the medical industry... I seriously want nothing to do with any of it... especially this whole electronic record"keeping" thing.

49 posted on 05/15/2014 5:14:49 PM PDT by Rodamala
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To: Chode

That seems to be excellent advice, Chode. It’s really wonderful what’s available now.


50 posted on 05/15/2014 5:18:52 PM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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