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Travel teams are eroding community baseball: Washington Post opinion
Washington Post ^ | 5-29-14 | David Mendell

Posted on 06/01/2014 10:50:23 PM PDT by FlJoePa

By David Mendell

The shortstop ranged nimbly to his right, scooped up a sharp grounder and unleashed a strong throw to first base. Seeing the athletic play by my son, a burly fellow leaned against the chain-link fence.

"You've got a nice little ballplayer there," the man, Mike Adams, told me. "You should think about getting him into a full-time travel program. The sooner, the better."

I was a neophyte in the byzantine world of youth baseball, and Adams' husky voice carried the resonance of a father who had logged many hours behind caged dugouts. Yet I had to chuckle. "Mike," I said, "Nate's just 9. Full-time travel baseball, really?"

In the past three years, as an assistant coach with the youth baseball organization in Oak Park, Ill., and as manager of one of its part-time travel teams, I've watched more than a dozen kids my son's age follow the route suggested by Adams. Lured by a chance to compete at a more elite level, they've left local baseball for various full-time travel teams in Chicago's suburbs. Full-time travel baseball means many more practices and many more games — many of them far away. To rise in rankings and win tournaments, some teams, especially in warm climates, play nearly year-round, competing in as many as 120 games per year, more than most minor league players.

Travel ball is not new — it's been around for a couple of decades. But participation in full-time travel baseball has exploded in recent years. For example, in 2000, Atlanta's first All-American Wood Bat Classic tournament opened with about a dozen teams. This Memorial Day weekend, nearly 100 squads from half a dozen states will descend on fields throughout metropolitan Atlanta to participate. The players range in age from 8 to 14. Rebecca Davis, executive director of the Atlanta-based Youth Amateur Travel Sports Association, estimates that there are tens of thousands of travel teams in Georgia and Florida alone.

"The fast growth absolutely blindsided us," she conceded. "Those days of rec ball and local Little League, or just going to the park and playing ball — those days are nonexistent. They're gone. Now, it's all about travel."

That's an overstatement. Yes, Little League enrollment has declined 20 percent since its peak in 1997, from 3 million to 2.4 million. But 2.4 million players hardly suggests that community leagues are disappearing. And many young travel team players also play on their local teams.

Still, it's true that the playing field for youth baseball has changed dramatically since Little League was founded 75 years ago. And with the loss of so many players and their families to travel teams, our community league games have lost a certain sense of community.

Carl Stotz started Little League as a program that would teach sportsmanship and teamwork to preteen boys in his home town, Williamsport, Pa. The first game was played on June 6, 1939, when Lundy Lumber defeated Lycoming Dairy. The local business sponsorships helped keep participation costs low and root the teams in their communities. To this day, defined areas from which each local league can draw prevent teams from poaching good players from one another.

Travel ball, by contrast, is not cheap — participation fees average about $2,000 per player per year. And teams may invite players from anywhere in the region. Since tournaments and games are usually in other towns, players and their parents must spend many hours commuting.

Some travel ballplayers resemble professional athletes: Year by year, they go from one travel team to another, switching teammates and uniforms, with the name splashed across the front of the jersey usually signifying something other than their home town.

"Where's the local pride gone?" asked Tim Dennehy, pitching coach for Oak Park-River Forest High School's varsity team. "By the time my teammates and I got to high school, we were like family. We were already a team, picking each other up, playing for our community. Now, guys arrive from a bunch of different teams, and they know guys in the other dugout better than they know each other."

There have been concerns about the competitiveness fostered by youth baseball since Little League was in its infancy. As far back as 1957, Sports Illustrated wrote: "The two basic arguments which strike at the roots of Little League pop up year after year: it puts too much competitive pressure on the children; it brings out the monster in too many parents and adult leaders."

That description reminds me of my part-time travel team's first tournament victory in July 2012. The pugnacious coaching dad of the opposing team was so angered by an intentional walk I called, in hopes of setting up a double play, that he refused his second-place trophies and verbally threatened one of my assistant coaches. (I'll admit that it was probably poor form to intentionally walk a 10-year-old.)

But full-time travel teams encourage pressure, and negative character traits, of a higher order.

Dennehy, who pitched in the Yankees system, worries that they are breeding a more selfish mind-set, with some players far more concerned about their individual statistics than team performance. Their teams, after all, are ever changing.

And, of course, the whole system is based on the idea that travel teams offer elite athletes more professional coaching and more competitive play. While the expansion of travel ball may have diluted the level of competition somewhat, it's indisputable that travel players, who log so many more hours at the ballfield, tend to pick up both fundamentals and sophisticated skills at earlier ages. They're graduating from youth play to high school throwing pitches at a higher velocity than ever, and fielding and hitting with more proficiency than in eras past.

But Stephen Keener, president and chief executive of Little League International, questions whether travel ball is the key to something more. "There's this belief that a travel team and a higher level of competitive play will propel a child to a higher place. That belief is misguided," he told me. "There is something to be said for high-quality instruction, but at the end of the day, the player and his personal desire and his athletic ability will determine how far he goes in baseball."

As a parent, though, it's hard to resist the implications of the travel-team websites listing alumni who have gone on to college and pro teams. Who wouldn't want to give their child the best chance at success?

But there are physical and emotional costs.

Major League Baseball officials are looking at why higher numbers of budding pitching stars, such as Stephen Strasburg and Jose Fernandez, have suffered severe arm injuries in their early 20s. To a youth-coaching dad like myself, the answer is plain: overuse at young ages.

"I'm doing more and more operations on younger and younger arms every year," said Timothy Kremchek, head physician for the Cincinnati Reds, who specializes in Tommy John arm surgeries. "These kids are being overused and abused. They are playing on too many different teams and throwing too many breaking pitches. It's something we know about, but the abuse goes on. The parents are chasing some sort of dream. It makes me sick."

Kremchek has been instrumental in instituting pitch limits and banning breaking pitches in youth baseball in Ohio. And teams affiliated with Little League Baseball have implemented pitch limits nationwide, which is a start. Still, as Keener notes, many Little League participants also play on travel teams outside their local leagues, while others are on full-time teams, making it impossible for governing bodies to police how much baseball a kid is playing each year.

Travel ball also amplifies the risk of mental burnout.

"For too many kids, the genesis of a kid's passion for playing baseball is being lost in the full-time travel movement," laments Jim Donovan, a Chicago area baseball instructor and former University of Illinois second baseman. "It really troubles me when parents and coaches intervene in the process to the extent that kids just aren't enjoying the game anymore. And believe me, I see this all the time — kids who grab their gear bags, and the bags look so heavy on their shoulders, you know? And the kid's face, it just looks blank.

"The games have become so serious, and so many kids aren't enjoying it. It just breaks my heart when I see a kid reacting like that to the game that I love so much and have put so much faith in."

My son is now 12 and, although we've toyed with the idea of full-time travel ball, he has stuck with our local league (which is community-based but not affiliated with Little League) and part-time travel, progressing nicely as a shortstop and pitcher. Primarily, he wanted to keep playing with his friends. He was also deterred by the intense schedule of practices and games. "The travel kids are always talking about how much they practice, like every day, even in the winter," Nathan told me. "If I went to a travel team, I think my pitching arm would fall off."

I'm glad he's stayed, because I think the most significant missing element in professionally coached travel ball is the father-son experience. No other American sport seems to bond fathers and sons as securely as baseball. There's something about the pacing of the game, the long season, the buildup to dramatic late-inning heroics on steamy summer days and nights.

Take the trophy ceremony on one of those hot nights in 2012. As I was passing out the first-place hardware to my players, lined up down the first base line, my son's turn arrived. I had fist-bumped each player before him. But when Nate jogged up to me, I seized him in a bear hug. A lump formed in my throat that surely was visible from the parking lot.

All the work that we had logged in the batting cages and on the practice fields rushed through my head, as did the sacrifices to my career and aging body. As a tear rolled down my cheek, Nathan looked up at me and said: "Dad, you gotta let go now. Everybody's watching us." I could have held my 10-year-old boy in that hug forever. No amount of paid coaching could buy that moment.


TOPICS: Miscellaneous; Society; Sports
KEYWORDS: baseball; littleleague
Found this from the other day. The writer has a unique perspective from the inside.

Personally, I don't have much time for the Cal Ripkens of the world that profit on the backs of easily sold parents while shunning Little League. Little League isn't perfect, but travel baseball is like a smaller, whiter AAU basketball in some ways.

I understand the need for travel teams (we don't even have Little League where I live), but I wish it wouldn't start until age 13 so that kids could (have to) play with their neighbors and classmates in Little League. That's how you make friends and teammates.

Friday will mark the 75th anniversary of the first ever Little League game in Williamsport. Carl Stotz just wanted to help some kids. He was at odds with LLB for years over their commercialization, but made amends before his death.

What he would think of travel ball, no one really knows. I would think that he would say someone took their eye off the ball at some point.

1 posted on 06/01/2014 10:50:24 PM PDT by FlJoePa
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Semi related:

I couldn’t say who started it...but I’m guessing they eventually fed off each other... Seems like everyone I know with kids between 12-18 that play softball or baseball or does band or cheerleading is “going to nationals.”

Just how many national tournaments are there? Is this part of the everyone-gets-a-medal mentality or crass money making? Both I think.

I’m sure the organizers would maintain that the LL World Series shouldn’t have a monopoly on deciding who is the best etc etc...but how long until resumes and college applications hit the round file as soon as the phrase “went to nationals” shows up. I think we’re well on our way to that already. Like that Twilight Zone episode where the gold thieves put themselves to sleep for a hundred years and wake up in a world where gold is practically worthless


2 posted on 06/01/2014 11:16:55 PM PDT by KneelBeforeZod (I have five dollars for each of you)
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To: KneelBeforeZod
Heh...I hear the same all the time. The local young cheerleaders constantly come home from competitions with 6' trophies. Either there's something in the water, or there are lot of 6' trophies being given out.

It just doesn't seem right that I live in a place where kids can't dream about this:


3 posted on 06/01/2014 11:43:18 PM PDT by FlJoePa ("Success without honor is an unseasoned dish; it will satisfy your hunger, but it won't taste good")
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To: FlJoePa

What crappy parents. What kid wouldn’t want to stay and play with their friends? Instead a greedy parent pushes the road and no ties lifestyle on a child. Pathetic.


4 posted on 06/01/2014 11:53:44 PM PDT by vpintheak (I will not comply!)
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To: FlJoePa

This makes me think of the South Park episode where all the little league teams were trying to lose on purpose so that they didn’t have to play any more.

My kids are all under six so I don’t have this problem yet, but I do want them involved in something. My beef is the mandatory crap that they now have with youth sports. I know people that don’t go on vacation because of mandatory practices or games. And family dinner every evening? Try dad takes a kid to volleyball and they get Wendy’s while mom tales the other two to soccer and they get McDonald’s.


5 posted on 06/02/2014 3:34:20 AM PDT by goodwithagun (My gun has killed fewer people than Ted Kennedy's car.)
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To: goodwithagun
My beef is the mandatory crap that they now have with youth sports. I know people that don’t go on vacation because of mandatory practices or games. And family dinner every evening? Try dad takes a kid to volleyball and they get Wendy’s while mom tales the other two to soccer and they get McDonald’s.

That is exactly the way it happens. And it starts at about age 7 now too. The typical conversation you hear among parents at a kid's game is about how they are going to get all their various kids to all their games that weekend.
Oh, and "playdates" aka, spending a weekend afternoon at a friend's house just having fun. Almost non-existent. Can't find anyone available. Everyone has a game or is traveling. You have children playing games half way across the country. Really?

Youth sports has become completely toxic.

6 posted on 06/02/2014 3:44:07 AM PDT by southern rock
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To: vpintheak
What crappy parents. What kid wouldn’t want to stay and play with their friends? Instead a greedy parent pushes the road and no ties lifestyle on a child. Pathetic.

Really? A child can't make friends with the other children on a travel team? Odd.

7 posted on 06/02/2014 3:51:47 AM PDT by raybbr (Obamacare needs a death panel.)
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To: FlJoePa

What I find disheartening is the majority of kids who play travel ball are “forced” to by their daddy who dreamed of playing baseball but failed. They want to live vicariously through their child. They push their kids like sled dogs.


8 posted on 06/02/2014 5:12:46 AM PDT by Hyman Roth
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To: vpintheak

The greedy parent does all this so he can wear the gear of the travel team around town and brag how his kid plays “elite” sports. I see it all the time. The dad is always a Walter Mitty type who never played ball himself.


9 posted on 06/02/2014 5:26:05 AM PDT by gusty (9)
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To: FlJoePa

This year marks the first time since 2010 neither of my 2 boys is playing baseball. Oldest one is in the Autism spectrum, and our town has no way for him to play without actually competing (he can’t handle the concept of winning and losing.)

My other son, our middle child, is more into hockey anyway...and last year, for his age group (7-8 yr olds), ensured his kid’s team had all the “best” players (of course), to make sure his kid would be in the league champion team.

This year, all the kids from that team are in the “travel” team. So, this year, my middle dude is exclusively in hockey (which, as they start full-ice this year, is going to entail enough travel already.)


10 posted on 06/02/2014 6:04:18 AM PDT by JRios1968 (I'm guttery and trashy, with a hint of lemon. - Laz)
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To: JRios1968

I am not a parent and don’t know anything about autism, but I do know most Little Leagues have a Challenger division. That may be something worth looking into.


11 posted on 06/02/2014 6:45:19 AM PDT by darkangel82
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To: FlJoePa
"Personally, I don't have much time for the Cal Ripkens of the world that profit on the backs of easily sold parents while shunning Little League."

My son has played travel baseball for the last 5 or 6 years. We've played in tournaments at the Ripken sites in both Maryland and SC. They are EXTREMELY well run and have always been an extremely positive experience for all the boys (and, no, we've never come close to actually winning one of the tournaments).

Clearly, nether you nor the (no doubt) lib writer of this piece have a clue. You're both taking the most extreme negative stereotypes and applying them universally. In short, you both have no idea what you're talking about - and its hilarious. Hilariously sad, but still hilarious.

I'm laughing at you right now.

Hard.

Really hard.

12 posted on 06/02/2014 6:57:10 AM PDT by safeasthebanks ("The most rewarding part, was when he gave me my money!" - Dr. Nick)
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To: darkangel82

When we were in SoCal, our local league did have a Challenge team...my son played.

Then we moved to Wisconsin, and nada. Just as well, he’s developing into a singer instead.


13 posted on 06/02/2014 7:14:53 AM PDT by JRios1968 (I'm guttery and trashy, with a hint of lemon. - Laz)
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To: southern rock

The league here is full of lunatic parents living through their five year olds. You should see a tball game! It is the craziest thing I have seen in youth sports. They have All Stars for tball. They pay $200 to be on the all star team. The parents then have to pay gate entry fees at every park during tournaments. To watch tball. The fees are set by Cal Ripkin organization at $6 per person over 10. So for a family with just two adults attending a three day tball tournament , that is $36. Typically, they will play in five tournaments during the summer. They have to travel to most tournaments and pay for hotels and food. They practice at least four times a week. TBALL!!!

And I thought we were crazy when we started travel ball with a ten year old! (That was eight years ago. Two of the players from our team back then have scholarships to play at DivI schools. I think everyone else from that team burned out, injured themselves, or lost interest.)

A big problem I see in youth sports is that Sunday is not respected as a day for church attendance. We have certainly been guilty of skipping church in favor of baseball games. It was wrong.


14 posted on 06/02/2014 7:46:47 AM PDT by petitfour
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To: raybbr

I guess you missed the whole, change uniform from year go year thing. No way any real friendship can be built like that


15 posted on 06/02/2014 7:55:14 AM PDT by vpintheak (I will not comply!)
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To: FlJoePa

My nephew is an a excellent ballplayer. (Just got a full ride scholarship to the college of his choice to play ball). He plays first base and pitches.

He’s played travel ball since he was about 8. Lots and lots of practices and games and weekend tournaments.

He fortunately still enjoys the game but I believe he has lost out on much of his childhood. For example, his dad wouldn’t let him climb trees for fear he’d hurt his throwing arm.

But the biggest loss is his relationship with his non-immediate family. Everything in his life revolves around baseball, so much so that he is almost a stranger to his grandparents and cousins (and to me).

What are our children going to be like as adults when we teach them that the game is more important than anything else in their lives? If family doesn’t count? If their relationship with the Lord is less important than their ERA?

My nephew (so far) appears to still have a level head on his shoulders but I’ve already seen some of his team mates descend into the spoiled prima donna mind set. These kids believe that they are the sole reason for existence and several of them have already been in trouble with drugs and the law.

Travel ball is OK, BUT it must be kept in perspective and very few it seems manage to keep the correct perspective.


16 posted on 06/02/2014 7:58:09 AM PDT by John O (God Save America (Please))
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To: FlJoePa

Nothing wrong with kids playing sports, but it shouldn’t consume their lives, lest they wind up like Todd Marinovich, unable to handle the real world.


17 posted on 06/02/2014 8:00:29 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: FlJoePa

little league ends at 12 this starts at 13.


18 posted on 06/02/2014 8:01:50 AM PDT by morphing libertarian ( On to impeachment and removal (IRS, Benghazi)!!!)
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To: vpintheak

“I guess you missed the whole, change uniform from year go year thing. No way any real friendship can be built like that.”

Do you actually have any experience with children on a travel team? Do you think that every year the roster is completely new and parents don’t make an effort to keep their children on the same teams?

It really sounds as though you read the article and taking every negative thing as the only truth.


19 posted on 06/02/2014 8:40:03 AM PDT by raybbr (Obamacare needs a death panel.)
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To: FlJoePa

the author’s kid will likely be a fine D2 or D3 player, and there is absolutely no shame in a kid wanting to do as the author states.

Some kids want more.

My daughter receieved a full ride to an out of state D1 school in lacrosse. With her injury red shirt season, the school in question paid for 5 years, she walked away with her Masters degree in addition to her undergrad. And a semester abroad.

Kind of puts the 2K a year for 5 or 6 years in a different perspective.

I’d be willing to wager that Penn State’s baseball team is almost entirely populated with travel league players. That’s how the kids get exposure to the college coaches, by playing those big tournies.

And I’d love to know what the gratuitous shot at Cal Ripken was all about.


20 posted on 06/02/2014 10:20:32 AM PDT by dmz
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To: raybbr

No. Do you?
The whole thing sounds to me like pure insanity though. I’m not talking part-time, I am talking about the full-time travel.
I would be willing to bet that it is the parent driving the child most of the time. A kid has a little talent and fun, and the parent takes that goes nuts. What normal parent thinks it’s actually good for a kid to live a life like that? What about roots? what about stability? None of that exists with a life like that.


21 posted on 06/02/2014 10:26:56 AM PDT by vpintheak (I will not comply!)
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To: vpintheak

I do. Have the experience of being a parent to a travel athlete, that is. Lacrosse, for the record. Women’s lacrosse.

You have read now one article on the topic and you seem to think that you know everything there is to know about it.

You don’t.

She rec’d a full ride to an out of state Division 1 school, and through the misfortune of a knee injury, was red shirted so she was at said school for 5 years. Turned it into a masters in addition to her undergrad.

Now is the youngest assistant AD the prep school she coaches at (in a major lacrosse hotbed location on the east coast) in their history. Also coaches a club team. In two years has been to the championship game twice, winning one of them.

Oh, and in those same 2 years has given birth to 2 beautiful healthy baby boys (married to her college sweetheart).

Frankly, I think my wife and I did pretty well, not that I’d ever consider us normal.

I’m sorry to suggest the following, but like the old Firesign Theatre album says (on this topic), Everything you Know is Wrong.


22 posted on 06/02/2014 11:05:35 AM PDT by dmz
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To: FlJoePa

my son is in small town little league. And yes, there is always talk of “Travel Teams”.

I guess I’m a dinosaur but I’ll avoid it.


23 posted on 06/02/2014 11:11:59 AM PDT by roofgoat
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To: FlJoePa
I have no objection to a youth moving on to travel ball after little league. I would qualify that by saying that to mean if he is a position player and not a pitcher, he would greatly benefit from all the additional repetitions both in the field and at bat. Also, players benefit greatly by playing in a caliber of ball above their age group or above their current talent level.

That being said, pitchers are often abused by pitching once or twice a week from March through November. You wonder where the Tommy John surgeries are coming from? Somebody has to pitch to all those position players who are getting all those additional reps. So, parents- guard your son's pitching arm and rely on pitch counts and make sure he gets a chance to rest his arm periodically- hopefully for several weeks at a time, several times a year. Better yet, let him be a position player who just pitches occasionally. His arm will last a lot longer.

Final words of advice, raise your boy to be a lefty. They stay in baseball forever.

24 posted on 06/02/2014 11:15:12 AM PDT by shortstop (It's too bad that stupidity isn't painful)
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To: southern rock

you know what was fun southern rock? This past Memorial Day another Dad and his 7 year old son picked up his schoolmate friend (also 7) and met me and my boy (classmate/friend also 7) at the town’s baseball field.

We spent almost 2 hours in the morning doing BP, ground balls and base running.

It was a great way to start the day and it’s getting our boys needed practice for the upcoming season.


25 posted on 06/02/2014 11:16:09 AM PDT by roofgoat
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To: dmz

I don’t have any problem with travel ball. I just think kids should play community ball or little league until they turn 13. As for Ripkin - he has taken cheap shots at Little League for years.


26 posted on 06/02/2014 11:38:34 AM PDT by FlJoePa ("Success without honor is an unseasoned dish; it will satisfy your hunger, but it won't taste good")
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To: dmz

I agree with you regarding specialized sports that are not “pickup” game in nature like lacrosse.

But this whole “specialized” teams are typical new age crap.

You have latin 3rd worlders who play in rags and lousy equipment that end up kicking butt in the majors. Why? Desire and lots of playing.

Same with basketball. Do you think black kids in the cities became great because of travel teams or clinics? No way, tons of “playing” and then if one is hungry, individual practice.


27 posted on 06/02/2014 11:58:23 AM PDT by roofgoat
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To: roofgoat

But this whole “specialized” teams are typical new age crap.

<><><><

I have no idea what you mean by this.


28 posted on 06/02/2014 2:07:10 PM PDT by dmz
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To: FlJoePa

I don’t have any problem with travel ball. I just think kids should play community ball or little league until they turn 13.

<><><>

I coached rec council baseball until my son was age 10 or so. By the time they get to that age, too many parents were sure their kids were the second coming of [fill in whoever was the most popular baseball player at the time].

I was a coach because my job afforded me the flexibility to do so (reason #2) but primarily so I could spend time with my son and his friends and share my love of the game with them (reason #1).

I don’t know anything about Cal badmouthing little league, would love to see his comments if you have access to them. A jiffy quick google search doesnt turn up anything.


29 posted on 06/02/2014 2:29:15 PM PDT by dmz
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To: petitfour
The league here is full of lunatic parents living through their five year olds.

They are also living for the dream of not paying for college. So they place the burden on their kids.

30 posted on 06/02/2014 3:48:08 PM PDT by southern rock
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To: raybbr
Do you actually have any experience with children on a travel team? Do you think that every year the roster is completely new and parents don’t make an effort to keep their children on the same teams?

My nephew played for 6 different teams in the 12 years he played travel ball.

He knows lots of kids but never talks to any of them. No friendships were formed.

Of the kids from his longest tenured team that I know, about 6 have been on more than 4 teams and few of them keep in touch anymore.

We had one year were the team was kind of family-like. But after that it was just another minor league business. (My nephew left the team one year later)

My nephew was deprived a normal childhood (with such things as friends and unstructured time to just play) as he was either practicing or playing ball full time.

31 posted on 06/04/2014 10:28:47 AM PDT by John O (God Save America (Please))
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To: vpintheak

I hear you. I have even heard parents say “It’s okay if you lose this game, it’s just in-house” to their son. Travel ball is killing our little league. The best pitchers don’t pitch because they are “saving their arms” for the travel game, which is “obviously” more important than the lowly little league game. I feel bad for my oldest son. We are stuck in a SUPER competitive (elite?) little league district. He is a very good all-around player, but not what you’d call “elite”....which means able to hit home runs at will in my town. He can slap singles and doubles just about every at-bat and against the “elite” pitchers, but that’s not good enough apparently. He loves baseball, plays it well and just wants to be able to play and experience it in the summer. He would make just about any other district team in the area most likely, but not in the league we’re stuck with. The same 11 kids have played on the summer team since t-ball. I just wish he had options.


32 posted on 06/09/2014 6:53:19 AM PDT by Phillyred
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To: petitfour
The league here is full of lunatic parents living through their five year olds.

Heck, Little League was like that, even back when I played as a kid.

33 posted on 06/09/2014 6:56:08 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: dfwgator

Hell with travel ball. Life is too short for this kind of nonsense.


34 posted on 06/09/2014 7:05:15 AM PDT by MinorityRepublican
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To: MinorityRepublican

I agree, this sounds like the newest “new age” method of ruining a childs most influential years. My 3 sons still have active friendships with a couple of boys they went to grade schools with, played little league with, participated in scouting with and went thru high school with. It is funny to listen to them talk about the good old times that always end up being discussion about little league ball.


35 posted on 08/23/2014 3:12:40 PM PDT by biff (WAS)
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To: FlJoePa

My girls (12 and 13) just started with the local fast pitch softball organization. No one is traveling anywhere. I complain about the practice field being 5 miles away and that’s the farthest I’ll travel.


36 posted on 08/23/2014 3:21:31 PM PDT by steve86 ( Acerbic by nature, not nurture)
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To: southern rock

When we moved into our former neighborhood in the Summer of ‘87, we didn’t know any kids lived there until school opened in September. Then each afternoon, the corners near the bus stop were lined with station wagons (eventually SUVs) with Moms waiting to pick up kids to car them to soccer/swim/piano/violin/dance/whatever. ANYTHING but playing in the neighborhood. Often the kid started the day at swim practice at 5am! This is elementary school kids.

The parents’ mentality is that if Suzie or Johnny has the best training, develop high level skills, etc., s/he will win an athletic/music scholarship to XYZ University, relieving mom and dad of that tuition burden. I often wondered what would happen if they just put the extra $$$ into a scholarship fund. Typically, after 13 years the kids are burned out, most aren’t such stars that universities are pursuing them, and mom/dad are still stuck with the tuition bill. In the meanwhile, they’ve had NO real childhood. Sad.


37 posted on 08/23/2014 4:59:04 PM PDT by EDINVA
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