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Casey Kasem could have died from wife disconnecting his feeding tube, .... EXCLUSIVE
NY daily news ^ | Nancy Dillon

Posted on 06/12/2014 7:34:14 PM PDT by Morgana

FULL TITLE: Casey Kasem could have died from wife disconnecting his feeding tube, snatching him from nursing home — EXCLUSIVE

Casey Kasem could have died after his wife disconnected his surgically implanted feeding tube and snatched him from a California nursing home against medical advice at 2:30 a.m., staff members claim.

The shocking details — revealed in documents and an exclusive interview with a private investigator — paint a desperate portrait of Jean Kasem, who grabbed her husband out of Berkley East Convalescent Hospital on May 7.

“She disconnected his G-tube, which provided his only source to nutrition and hydration,” Dr. Paul Leitner, who was Kasem’s doctor at the facility, wrote to Santa Monica police. “She was informed of the risks of doing so and was told she was placing Mr. Kasem in great bodily harm or possible demise.”

Jennifer Kusiappiah, a registered nurse, also signed a statement, saying Kasem’s wife was concerned about her 82-year-old husband’s privacy after his daughters, Kerri and Julie, visited their father.

“Mrs. Kasem insisted on taking Mr. Kasem out of the facility, even though I have clearly explained that it was dangerous and can be fatal due to his medical condition,” she said.

(Excerpt) Read more at nydailynews.com ...


TOPICS: Chit/Chat
KEYWORDS: caseykasem; kasem; prolife
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This family is nuts.
1 posted on 06/12/2014 7:34:14 PM PDT by Morgana
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To: Morgana
Casey Kasem could have died after his wife disconnected his surgically implanted feeding tube and snatched him from a California nursing home against medical advice at 2:30 a.m., staff members claim. The shocking details — revealed in documents and an exclusive interview with a private investigator — paint a desperate portrait of Jean Kasem, who grabbed her husband out of Berkley East Convalescent Hospital on May 7. “She disconnected his G-tube, which provided his only source to nutrition and hydration,” Dr. Paul Leitner, who was Kasem’s doctor at the facility, wrote to Santa Monica police. “She was informed of the risks of doing so and was told she was placing Mr. Kasem in great bodily harm or possible demise.”

Could have, or did?

2 posted on 06/12/2014 7:42:45 PM PDT by Alex Murphy ("the defacto Leader of the FR Calvinist Protestant Brigades")
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To: Alex Murphy

I think it’s trying to imply Mrs. Kasem removed Casey from the unit but did not succeed in taking his life.

After reading the whole thing several times I have come to the conclusion the whole family is nuts and am Praying for Kasey.


3 posted on 06/12/2014 7:44:25 PM PDT by Morgana ( Always a bit of truth in dark humor.)
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To: Morgana; KC_Lion
Casey Kasem is a waste of protoplasm. He is (and soon "will have been") an unhinged anti-Semite, hating Jews and especially an irrational hatred of Israel. His support for mooselimbs is shown below in the picture taken at a pro-Hamas fundraising dinner:

He is (or shortly "was") also an anti-nuke nut of the hippie peacenik sort. A liberal of the worst sort, Arab-apologist Kasem won't be missed one iota by those who love America and Israel.

4 posted on 06/12/2014 7:46:17 PM PDT by re_nortex (DP - that's what I like about Texas)
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To: Morgana

I’m confused. I thought the children wanted to remove the feeding tube and the wife wanted to keep it.


5 posted on 06/12/2014 7:47:31 PM PDT by nickcarraway
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To: Morgana

I read earlier today that his daughter had either been given permission to or had made the decision to stop treatment and allow him to pass.


6 posted on 06/12/2014 7:51:05 PM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Haven't you lost enough freedoms? Support an end to the WOD now.)
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To: Morgana

This is yellow journalism.


7 posted on 06/12/2014 7:51:08 PM PDT by ifinnegan
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To: re_nortex

Only thing I remember him is for American top 40. Though the other day I found out he was the voice of “Shaggy” on scooby doo. Never knew that but it’s cool. All he was to me is a radio star. Then again how many other radio stars we know of are sell outs?


8 posted on 06/12/2014 7:51:15 PM PDT by Morgana ( Always a bit of truth in dark humor.)
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To: Morgana

Kasem could have died? Isn’t that what his kids are working to achieve right now?


9 posted on 06/12/2014 7:51:17 PM PDT by Mastador1 (I'll take a bad dog over a good politician any day!)
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To: nickcarraway

Exactly.


10 posted on 06/12/2014 7:52:36 PM PDT by ifinnegan
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To: re_nortex

You’re right about this.

I certainly didn’t know of it. As kids we don’t know or understand such things.

But, this isn’t about Kasem per se. The discussion and interest is due to broader concerns relating to respect for life and respect for the sanctity of marriage.


11 posted on 06/12/2014 7:56:42 PM PDT by ifinnegan
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To: Morgana

I cannot believe someone like this did not prepare medical directives.

It’s not like he did not know his disease was slowly progressing.

If he did not, he deserves what he gets.


12 posted on 06/12/2014 7:58:25 PM PDT by Vermont Lt (If you want to keep your dignity, you can keep it. Period........ Just kidding, you can't keep it.)
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To: Morgana
Then again how many other radio stars we know of are sell outs?

Being a mere sellout is one thing and a lot of people may momentarily compromise their principles for financial reward. But Kreepy Kasem stands against Israel and sides with the muzzies because that's the side he's on. Simply search the web using the phrase "No tears for Kasem" to get the unvarnished truth about this vile American-hating leftist.

13 posted on 06/12/2014 7:59:28 PM PDT by re_nortex (DP - that's what I like about Texas)
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To: Morgana

I thought the judge ordered his feeding tube disconnected and his wife was opposed to doing so.


14 posted on 06/12/2014 8:01:32 PM PDT by Uncle Chip
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To: Blood of Tyrants
stop treatment and allow him to pass.

When someone is on a ventilator and has no hope of recovery and the vent is removed, it allows them to pass.

When someone has difficulty swallowing and therefore receives food and water through a feeding tube, taking away that food and water doesn't "allow them to pass." It kills them. The cause of death is not the disease process but dehydration. And it's a very bad way to die.

15 posted on 06/12/2014 8:02:11 PM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: Morgana
Get away from here! I'm going to remove his feeding tube!

Oh no you're not! I'm going to rip out that tube! He's MY father!

Over my dead body!

Great! I'll kill you first and then I'll yank those f...ing tubes out!
16 posted on 06/12/2014 8:04:41 PM PDT by jobim (.)
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To: re_nortex

While that may all be true, he still has a God-given, UNALIENABLE right to life. Until God takes him out of here, no one has any right to dehydrate him to death.


17 posted on 06/12/2014 8:04:45 PM PDT by EternalVigilance
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To: Brian Kopp DPM

Casey is also suffering from dementia and has sepsis from infected bed sores. He is old and dying and unable to take sustenance on his own. Let him pass from this life in peace.


18 posted on 06/12/2014 8:05:20 PM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Haven't you lost enough freedoms? Support an end to the WOD now.)
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To: Vermont Lt

“I cannot believe someone like this did not prepare medical directives.”

-

I took care of this several years ago-— with my family and my doctor.

Legal documents also.

.


19 posted on 06/12/2014 8:09:42 PM PDT by Mears
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To: Blood of Tyrants
He is old and dying and unable to take sustenance on his own.

That's going to be 80% of us someday. That's grounds to euthanize him? Keep him comfortable and let him die a natural death from the dementia or the sepsis if he really is dying, but why take away his water and food? That's euthanasia, that's not "letting him die."

20 posted on 06/12/2014 8:19:06 PM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: Brian Kopp DPM

Natural death didn’t used to include IV’s and medical intervention for people who have no hope for recovery. That makes it different from Terri Schiavo.

My father died of an inoperable Glioblastoma IV. It had taken over most of his frontal lobe and rendered him blind and unable to speak. He was a vibrant man, a triathlete at 77 and he had a living will. The cancer made him unable to eat or drink. He would not wanted to live that way or prolong his life in the hell that tumor wrecked on him.

Everyone’s situation is different. Broad brushes do no one favors.


21 posted on 06/12/2014 8:57:06 PM PDT by mplsconservative (Barack Hussein 0bama has American blood on HIS hands!)
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To: Brian Kopp DPM

“When someone has difficulty swallowing and therefore receives food and water through a feeding tube, taking away that food and water doesn’t “allow them to pass.” It kills them. The cause of death is not the disease process but dehydration. And it’s a very bad way to die”

You should have read the whole article.


22 posted on 06/12/2014 9:06:55 PM PDT by TexasGator
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To: TexasGator

I’ve read all of them about this case so far. What do you think I missed? The claim that he’s dying and the food and water is simply causing him discomfort? I’ve seen hospices tell families that when it clearly was not true so please forgive me if I’m skeptical.


23 posted on 06/12/2014 9:12:14 PM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: Brian Kopp DPM

“The claim “

Reviewed by a judge.


24 posted on 06/12/2014 9:16:39 PM PDT by TexasGator
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To: mplsconservative
That makes it different from Terri Schiavo.

Terri was only receiving food and water by feeding tube. She was receiving no other life sustaining treatment and would not have died if it weren't for the removal of her food and water.

I suspect this case is very similar. He has Lewy Body Dementia which makes it difficult for him to swallow. If not for the removal of hydration by feeding tube he most likely would not be at immediate risk of death. Sepsis is dangerous but usually treatable, as are bed sores.

25 posted on 06/12/2014 9:18:06 PM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: TexasGator

Terri Schiavo’s case was reviewed by a judge too. I still don’t see your point. I generally don’t trust judges at this point in our history to do the right thing when it comes to medical ethics.


26 posted on 06/12/2014 9:19:58 PM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: Blood of Tyrants

Amen to that. My father passed from this very diagnosis. It is a horrible end. There is no “cure” and all these “heroic” efforts only prolong suffering.


27 posted on 06/12/2014 9:20:05 PM PDT by Bookwoman ("...and I am unanimous in this...")
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To: Brian Kopp DPM

” I still don’t see your point.”

Your posts implied that they were arbitrarily pulling the tubes to kill him. My point is that there is more to the story.


28 posted on 06/12/2014 9:31:12 PM PDT by TexasGator
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To: Brian Kopp DPM

Brian, I shouldn’t post on this thread, because I have done so on earlier threads, much to my regret. This subject is too close, and extremely painful to me, personally .

I recognize and respect your opinion on general medical emergency life-threatening issues, but not when it involves Parkinson’s, complicated by probable Lewy Body dementia, & consequent brain destruction. This is not in your area of expertise as a Podiatrist.

My beloved husband of 45 years, a brilliant MIT graduate with a master’s degree, died in March of 2011, after suffering for 14 years. I did my very best to care for him, constantly arguing in the later years with hospitals and rehab care after several Parkinson’s crises, to please respect the medical importance of scheduling his needed meds and meals, so the meds would work.

He suffered so when he was hospitalized and in rehab. The med team and the food delivery team didn’t/couldn’t deal with the timing issues - too complicated. If these are not controlled, the Parkinson’s meds aren’t absorbed, and don’t work.

As his autonomic nervous system shut down, gradually at first, and then cascading, he lost his desire to eat and drink, in spite of my best efforts to make his favorite foods, provide his favorite beverages.

When his internist, and neurologist specializing in autonomic disorders, then the Mayo clinic in Rochester MN could no longer help, hospice was my only hope to keep him out of pain, and free of fear, hallucinations, and overwhelming anxiety.

I looked for and found a wonderful Roman Catholic hospice, who came in, brought in a lift frame, hospital bed, a soothing Harpist playing his favorite music, and who helped manage his pain and make his final days quiet and peaceful, as he wanted.

While I respect your expertise in podiatry, I do not consider you qualified to express an opinion in this particular medical circumstance, or to pass judgement on those of us who are left to carry out the wishes of those we have loved for decades.

Please know that I am not alone in finding your general aspersions cast toward those of us who have had to make difficult and heart-breaking decision to let those we love so much go without the complications of extensive medical technology doing harm.

Do podiatrists take that oath - “first do no harm”? What happens when a feeding tube forces food into a stomach and bowel that are no longer functioning, when liquids are pushed into a dying body whose kidneys have shut down?

Tube feeding can do miracles in some situations, but not all. Stick to your specialty, or get informed about the complexity of end-of-life complicated issues.

This is rambling and long winded, probably because it comes from a dark place of pain and loss. This isn’t an intellectual discussion for me, it is deeply personal.


29 posted on 06/12/2014 9:34:27 PM PDT by jacquej ("It is the peculiar quality of a fool to perceive the faults of others and to forget his own.")
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To: Blood of Tyrants

“I read earlier today that his daughter had either been given permission to or had made the decision to stop treatment and allow him to pass.”

I have seen talk of this but with all the in house fighting in the family it just does not look good, know what I mean? Really though it is wrong to say “in house” because it seems this family is doing a Jerry Springer all over the place if this story is to be believed.


30 posted on 06/12/2014 9:41:58 PM PDT by Morgana ( Always a bit of truth in dark humor.)
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To: jobim
"Get away from here! I'm going to remove his feeding tube! Oh no you're not! I'm going to rip out that tube! He's MY father! Over my dead body! Great! I'll kill you first and then I'll yank those f...ing tubes out!" jerry springer photo: How I Feel Right Now 005a01c8d0ddd2b1b2f08615db48MA19943.jpg
31 posted on 06/12/2014 9:47:12 PM PDT by Morgana ( Always a bit of truth in dark humor.)
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To: jacquej

In addition to being a Podiatrist I also work for a Catholic hospice (not in the clinical care of patients.) I also will be serving as the chairman of a national pro life group that is deeply involved in end of life care. And we have directly cared for loved ones at end of life in very trying circumstances.

So even though I’m not a clinician directly involved in patient care, I am familiar with the topic at hand here and I’m in communication with the prolife leaders in the field. The opinions I express are not uninformed and this is an important pro life battle. Many people are dying prematurely from arbitrary withdrawal of hydration and nutrition and over medication with opioids, sedatives and antipsychotics.

So while I truly respect your views and your experience, I also have extensive experience in this field and feel a duty to point out the pro life aspects of this debate. Thank you for sharing your opinion.


32 posted on 06/12/2014 9:55:14 PM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: jacquej
What happens when a feeding tube forces food into a stomach and bowel that are no longer functioning, when liquids are pushed into a dying body whose kidneys have shut down?

Good hospice care is carefully monitored with individualized plans of care and feeding is tapered and ceased when these unfortunate events occur. It's not difficult to handle these things on an individualized basis with proper staffing and properly trained staff. These are not reasons to deny assisted hydration and nutrition.

We routinely get calls from patients who have feeding tubes for years from things such as esophageal cancer, who are active, mobile and wish to continue receiving feeding even on hospice care, but have been told by numerous other hospice providers that they must discontinue tube feeding if they want to be on hospice. This is a lie. There is no reason whatsoever that patients who have been successfully maintained for years with tube feeding have to give it up just to get accepted onto hospice care.

There are circumstances where assisted nutrition and hydration is overly burdensome. In those cases there is nothing wrong with discontinuing them or not initiating them. There are individuals who make their wishes known in advance directives that they do not desire assisted nutrition and hydration should they become incapcitated and be unable to express their wishes. Their wishes must be respected.

But the idea that tube feedings and IVs are always bad or burdensome is simply false and it is a sad reality that many people are dying prematurely due to dehydration from premature withdrawal of fluids and food.

33 posted on 06/12/2014 10:12:49 PM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: Morgana

Julie Kasem, 38, Casey’s middle child and a licensed physician assistant with advanced training in palliative and hospice care, and her husband, Dr. Jamil Aboulhosn, a cardiologist at UCLA Medical Center, filed a conservatorship petition in Superior Court, charging that though her father had signed a medical directive in 2007 placing the couple in charge of his care if he were incapacitated, Jean Kasem had blocked them from finding out about his condition since the previous spring.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/casey-kasem-sad-strange-family-678902

From left: Kasem’s daughter Julie, Casey, daughter Kerri, Casey’s first wife, Linda, and son Mike at Kerri’s high school graduation. Says Mike: “Ever since we realized that there’s going to be no relationship with our stepmom, none of us has really been expecting anything. We knew that we better go make our own money. It’s so much more important to be happy and have family.”

According to Kerri and Mike Kasem, though their relationship with their father was a close and loving one, Jean, they say, never embraced the role of stepmother and friend to her husband’s children.
Strikingly beautiful in a Marilyn-meets-Anna Nicole mode, Jean subverted her classic looks by adopting a highly eccentric fashion sense that exaggerated her 5-foot-10 height and earned her repeat mentions on various worst-dressed lists. With Casey beaming beside her, she wore her hair in towering top knots, mountainous ziggurats of curls and dreadlocks and donned alarming white wigs and assorted headdresses. She once sported a top hat adorned with a Barbie doll.

Having started over with Jean, Casey Kasem also embraced a newfound passion for political and social activism during the ‘80s and early ‘90s, though he was care­ful never to inject his liberal convic­tions into AT40. “I now have the celebrity status to do effectively what I want to do with changing the world,” said Kasem, and he contributed time, money and his famous voice to a host of causes: animal rights, world peace, vegetarianism, anti-smoking and homelessness. In 1984 and 1988, he and Jean hosted fundraisers and campaign events for the quixotic presidential campaigns of Jackson.
But the two issues that consumed him more than any others were continuing violence in the Middle East and discrimination against Arab-Americans. In speeches and articles, he took Hollywood to task for “the vilification and defaming of Arabs in motion pictures and television.” Although not a Muslim, he denounced negative stereotyping of the Islamic faith and became a staunch defender of Yasir Arafat and the Palestinian struggle. He loudly opposed the 1991 Gulf War and attended the signing of the Oslo Peace Accord in Washington in 1993.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/casey-kasem-sad-strange-family-678902


34 posted on 06/12/2014 10:14:53 PM PDT by kcvl
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To: Brian Kopp DPM

Perhaps it is time for you to get some direct clinical experience with those who are suffering from autonomic system failure, and consequent organ shut-down.

I do not doubt that there are people dying prematurely, improperly denied hydration and nutrition, and overly medicated, as you suggest.

But, do not fall off the horse on that other side, because there are medical situations that require much less medical interference than is “present protocol”. And, many docs pursue these, for fear of legal consequences or personal gain.

General comments made in an online forum that could intimidate loving relatives trying their best to provide comfort and care for those terminally ill, making them feel guilty for not “doing everything medically possible” could be (in my layman’s opinion) at least, considered insensitive to individual situations, and might verge on what we commoners consider “verbal malpractice”.

Who knows what someone might decide to do, based on a general statement you have made over the internet? Have you considered the impact that the initials behind your screen name might have on someone who concludes you are more qualified than you are, in fact?

We do not want to devolve into a world where our loved ones, no matter what their age or circumstance, become subject for medical experimentation, when weird tests and trials are conducted in the “name of science, and the betterment of mankind”.

This has happened in the past, as I am sure you know, and it is probably happening in the present. I hope it never happens to me, or anyone I love.

In conclusion, remember that saying about words being like feathers released from a pillow?

Most doctors would not generalize on an internet site, about a patient they have not examined, or express an opinion on someone who medical history and situation they have not studied.

So, why have you?


35 posted on 06/12/2014 10:25:38 PM PDT by jacquej ("It is the peculiar quality of a fool to perceive the faults of others and to forget his own.")
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To: Morgana

Continues Kerri, “He told me that Jean was very insecure. He always told me, ‘It’s going to get better, I promise.’ It never did. To Jean, anybody who truly loved my father was an enemy, a sworn enemy.
“When he found out he had Parkinson’s, he wanted Julie and her husband to be in charge of his medical care if he was unable to make decisions. My dad signed when he was completely coherent and knew exactly what he was doing — a conservatorship over health, not estate, no finances, and a durable power of attorney over health. We were pushed out. She didn’t want us knowing anything.”

In an echo of her father’s many causes and campaigns, Kerri’s nonprofit foundation, Kasem Cares, has been raising funds to lobby for changes in California law that would provide greater protection for the visitation rights of adult children and mandate notification if a parent is hospitalized or dies. State Assemblyman Mike Gatto, a Democrat, has agreed to introduce the bill.
“Nobody, nobody should go through what we’re going through,” says Kerri. “This should be illegal. And I’m not saying that every kid deserves visitation. There may be kids where the parents don’t want to see them, or if they’ve done harm. I get it. But if we prevail, at least it would allow a judge to rule on visitation. Not finances, not money, not the will, not the estate. Just visitation.”

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/casey-kasem-sad-strange-family-678902


36 posted on 06/12/2014 10:25:48 PM PDT by kcvl
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To: jacquej
General comments made in an online forum that could intimidate loving relatives trying their best to provide comfort and care for those terminally ill, making them feel guilty for not “doing everything medically possible” could be (in my layman’s opinion) at least, considered insensitive to individual situations, and might verge on what we commoners consider “verbal malpractice”.

Sorry, but I'm not going to be threatened or bullied into silence on this issue, by you or anyone else. Six years ago I had to stand by silently while they euthanized a close personal friend with Parkinson's by dehydration. His kind of case is typical of what is occurring in the hospice and palliative care field, I've personally witnessed it, and I'm not going to be silent about it.

Fr. Gerard's Story:

I first met Fr. Gerard in 1998 while doing a house call for his mother. A brief initial conversation revealed that he was retired and living in a small apartment only a block from my office, and that we shared many Catholic and pro-life interests. Fr. Gerard soon became a close friend, and we met frequently for meals. I assisted him with various tasks around his apartment, and he called me often simply to talk. He got to know my wife and children well and relied on us for help, as his only sibling lived out of state. Fr. Gerard eventually developed Parkinson's disease. We offered to take him into our home, but knowing the chaos of our homeschooling household he politely declined, and entered a local nursing home. We continued to visit him often and took him out to dine at his favorite restaurants.

In late 2007 and early 2008, Fr. Gerard's health declined rapidly. He left a voice message on my cell phone late on a Wednesday in April 2008, asking me to stop and visit. By the time I was able to visit him two days later, he had been admitted to a local hospital for aspiration pneumonia, and had been diagnosed as "terminal" by the treating physician. He was transferred to the palliative care unit from the ER and the treating physician insisted that according to his Living Will, Fr. Gerard wanted no "extraordinary care" to prolong his life.

I was shocked that he was receiving no water, food or IV, only Morphine by slow IV drip. His Parkinson's was certainly advancing and the aspiration pneumonia was a serious crisis (aspiration pneumonia has a 20 to 60% mortality rate), but food and water did not constitute extraordinary care. We were permitted to wet a sponge to moisten his lips, and he would try to suck all the moisture from the sponge, but we were forbidden to give him a drink of water, because of the "risk of further aspiration pneumonia."

Fr. Gerard had shared with me his opposition to passive euthanasia in the past, and he was trying to talk to me, but he had become so dehydrated that he could not form words. When the attending physician made rounds, I told him my concern that Fr. Gerard was receiving no food or water. The physician asserted that "their hospice rules forbid IVs" as it only "prolonged the process." He then stated, "The public has a misconception that death by dehydration is torturous, but that's not true. It's the most humane way to do this, with the least discomfort. We will control any discomfort with the Morphine. That's what we're going to do."

With that the attending physician, a Catholic father of six, looked me in the eye defiantly, turned on his heels and left. I was speechless. The next day I pleaded with his sibling that Fr. Gerard would never have consented to passive euthanasia by dehydration, explaining that if he died now it would be due to dehydration, not the aspiration pneumonia or the Parkinson's, but to no avail.

I have always been pro-life. I had even attended pro-life conferences about euthanasia and had sat on the medical ethics committees of two hospitals, both in the mid 1990's. I had staff privileges at the hospital in question. But in April 2008, in Fr. Gerard's specific case, I simply did not know what to do. I called four good pro-life priests locally, begging for advice. They all agreed that something must be done but none could offer any specific advice, and because his sibling held power of attorney none could personally intervene to help their fellow priest.

Another priest I consulted recommended I request a medical ethics committee consultation. Late on a Thursday evening, eight days after Fr. Gerard had left the voice message on my cell phone, I spoke with a physician assistant who was on call for the ethics committee. I told her that he was a good priest and a faithful son of the Church who would never agree to being passively euthanized, and I discussed with her the relevant documents from the Vatican, the USCCB and the state bishops' conference. She asked me to enter these documents in Fr. Gerard's chart, and the medical ethics committee would be happy to review the case Friday morning on rounds.

Relieved that there was something I could finally do for this good priest, I went to the hospital Friday morning at 7:00am, asked the unit clerk to formally enter the documents into his chart for the ethics committee consultation, and headed down the hall to visit him.

His room was already empty. Fr. Gerard had died of dehydration several hours earlier.


37 posted on 06/12/2014 10:32:20 PM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: jacquej

Thank you for sharing your story. I can see how painful it was for you, and how deeply personal this is. Thank you for educating all of us. Your story is very moving and thought provoking.


38 posted on 06/12/2014 10:38:25 PM PDT by Dilbert San Diego (s)
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To: Vermont Lt

I read that he did have a directive that instructed to NOT be kept alive if circumstances such as this occurred.

The family is so dysfunctional...who knows what is really going on.


39 posted on 06/12/2014 10:49:25 PM PDT by berdie
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To: nickcarraway
You have been wrong on this from the start. You have insulted many Fr's in the process.
40 posted on 06/12/2014 10:57:30 PM PDT by Domangart (Tho I walk Through the valley of Wal-Mart, I fear no man.)
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To: Brian Kopp DPM

I do not care to continue this verbal badminton with you any longer.

I am also pro-life, up close and more personal than I care to share in a public forum, and have remained so for 7 decades.

Your condemnation of Catholic Hospice care might appear to some of us to be “Catholic bashing”, because it certainly doesn’t fit my experience (not RCatholic, but Anglican). They were dedicated to keep my husband alive, with me, comfortable, eating and drinking as much as humanly possible.

I sense that you have an agenda, and if so, there is no point in discussing it further. I believe in life, as you do, but we part ways when we get “technical” about how far to go when bodily systems have shut down, when more intervention is only for us, not those we love so much.

You have made your case, and I have made mine. Neither of us know the mind of God, and all any of us can do in our personal decisions is the best we can, given the information we have at the moment.

That, I pray, is all that is expected of us, except the humility to know how much we do not know.

Good night.


41 posted on 06/12/2014 10:58:06 PM PDT by jacquej ("It is the peculiar quality of a fool to perceive the faults of others and to forget his own.")
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To: Domangart

Please explain how I was “wrong on this from the start.” And what priests did I insult how?


42 posted on 06/12/2014 11:01:59 PM PDT by nickcarraway
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To: jacquej
Your condemnation of Catholic Hospice care

I'm not condemning Catholic Hospice care. I work for and am helping expand access to good Catholic Hospice care.

I follow the Church's directives on nutrition and hydration, ordinary vs extraordinary. That's my sole "agenda."

43 posted on 06/12/2014 11:03:35 PM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: Brian Kopp DPM

You seem to know a bit about hospice care. I have a question. Is it typical to remove medications (like blood pressure med’s, vitamins, etc) once a person is placed under hospice care?....and if so, why? Isn’t this hastening death and reducing quality of life?


44 posted on 06/12/2014 11:20:17 PM PDT by Girlene (Hey NSA!)
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To: jacquej
I sense that you have an agenda

The group I'm chairing is

dedicated to promoting and developing pro-life alternatives within the healthcare field, to combat the threat that the rationing of care and euthanasia pose to our vulnerable, sick, elderly and dying. We are setting up a pro-life hotline and a network of pro-life healthcare providers, facilities and institutions to help those threatened by health care rationing and the pressures for euthanasia. We are also working on developing a network of patient care advocates to help people navigate the landmine that our healthcare system is rapidly becoming.

To do this we are networking with established pro-life groups and healthcare organizations. In the future we hope to help grassroots pro-life healthcare providers and facilities (like our Catholic Hospice) get off the ground and fill in the gaps of the pro-life infrastructure to provide pro-life care at end of life.

More than likely we have far more in common than we do differences, we've just unfortunately found ourselves on opposite ends of very trying situations with loved ones we held dear.

I felt personally attacked by your posts on this thread, so my responses were probably stronger than they could have been. If so, my apologies.

45 posted on 06/12/2014 11:23:23 PM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: Girlene

See my pm.


46 posted on 06/12/2014 11:24:09 PM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM
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Comment #47 Removed by Moderator

To: ifinnegan

LOL!


48 posted on 06/13/2014 2:24:47 AM PDT by antceecee (Bless us Lord, forgive us our sins and bring us to everlasting life.)
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To: ifinnegan

LOL! (squared)!


49 posted on 06/13/2014 2:25:34 AM PDT by antceecee (Bless us Lord, forgive us our sins and bring us to everlasting life.)
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To: Brian Kopp DPM
Brian Kopp DPM wrote: "The claim that he's dying and the food and water is simply causing him discomfort? I've seen hospices tell families that when it clearly was not true so please forgive me if I'm skeptical."


Agree, I've seen and heard that also and it was not true at all. Trusting medical care staff to give proper medical care for a loved relative is dangerous, imho for heart and soul. We need to advocate for our loved ones.


50 posted on 06/13/2014 2:29:19 AM PDT by bd476
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