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US Navy divers to visit wreck of USS Houston in Indonesia
Fox News ^ | 6/9/2014

Posted on 06/14/2014 12:36:48 PM PDT by llevrok

Divers from the U.S. Navy will visit the World War II graveyard of the "Galloping Ghost of the Java Coast” — the sunken USS Houston — later this month in a bid to determine what remains of the ship, which went down with more than 700 sailors off the coast of Indonesia.

The wreck of the Northampton-class heavy cruiser, which was sunk by the Japanese during the World War II battle of Sunda Strait on Feb. 28, 1942, will be surveyed by Navy divers working with their counterparts from Indonesia. The ship lies about 125 feet deep, near Java, Indonesia, where it has become a popular dive site for scavengers. Navy officials now want to find out what's left of the sacred site, especially given that it rests in corrosive waters in an unstable region.

(snip)

The mighty, 570-foot ship was sailing at night with the Australian ship HMAS Perth when they ran into the Japanese destroyer Fubukim, which quietly shadowed them for the next half hour before the encounter culminated in what became known as the Battle of Sunda Strait. Houston scored hits on the Japanese ship Mikuma, then managed to elude a torpedo barrage from Fubukim. But other Japanese destroyers engaged the two Allies' ships, first sinking Perth and then sending Houston to the bottom just after midnight.

Of the crew of 1,061, some 368 survived, including 24 of the 74-man USMC detachment aboard. The crew became prisoners of the Japanese for the remainder of the war, with dozens dying at the hands of their Japanese captors.

(Excerpt) Read more at foxnews.com ...


TOPICS: History; Military/Veterans
KEYWORDS: fdr; indonesia; japan; navy; usnavy; usshouston; worldwareleven; ww2
FDR's Lost Cruiser. Read a book about it and what happened to the crew after her sinking.

Harrowing story of WW2 POW's. God rest all their souls.

1 posted on 06/14/2014 12:36:48 PM PDT by llevrok
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To: llevrok

Already a private group dedicated to documenting the site. One dude has over 80 dives on the wreck.

http://usshoustondive.com/


2 posted on 06/14/2014 12:40:03 PM PDT by TexasGator
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To: llevrok

Houston was already severely damaged from a previous battle. Japanese material and numerical superiority in the area was obvious. This was a desperate attack in hope of interrupting the Japanese offensive. I think every man on board understood it was effectively a suicide mission.


3 posted on 06/14/2014 12:44:33 PM PDT by buwaya
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To: llevrok



4 posted on 06/14/2014 12:47:15 PM PDT by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: llevrok

Maybe they’ll find Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 there, too.


5 posted on 06/14/2014 12:49:44 PM PDT by Veggie Todd (The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. TJ)
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To: llevrok

Bump. Read the book more than once.

I believe they have a memorial service every year in downtown Houston.


6 posted on 06/14/2014 12:51:14 PM PDT by smokingfrog ( sleep with one eye open (<o> ---)
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To: buwaya
.


The Japanese "Long Lance" torpeodos were deadly ...

Curious to learn more ?

If you're a Navy buff, you've GOT to read "Neptune's Inferno" !

Amazon link:

http://www.amazon.com/Neptunes-Inferno-U-S-Navy-Guadalcanal/dp/0553385127/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1402775471&sr=8-1&keywords=neptune%27s+inferno


.
7 posted on 06/14/2014 12:51:39 PM PDT by Patton@Bastogne (.)
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To: llevrok
What did your book have to say about IJN tactics at night?

From what I've read, the Japs had superb night doctrine in pre-radar days that just about cleaned USN surface action clocks into early 1943.

8 posted on 06/14/2014 12:55:31 PM PDT by Jacquerie (To restore the 10th Amendment, repeal the 17th. Article V.)
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To: Jacquerie

“From what I’ve read, the Japs had superb night doctrine in pre-radar days that just about cleaned USN “

Ask JFK ...


9 posted on 06/14/2014 1:07:18 PM PDT by TexasGator
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To: llevrok
HMAS Perth

10 posted on 06/14/2014 1:14:10 PM PDT by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: smokingfrog

I Live in Sugar Land and there was the annual “International Festival” in downtown Houston about 6 weeks ago.They pick a country for a theme each year.This year, it was Australia. They had a display about the USS Houston there, which I was happy to see.


11 posted on 06/14/2014 1:35:33 PM PDT by GrouchoTex (...and ye shall know the Truth and the Truth shall set you free....)
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Documentaries salute Houston’s WWII contributions
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1901165/posts

Ship of Ghosts: The Story of the USS Houston
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1767034/posts


12 posted on 06/14/2014 1:47:02 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: llevrok
The Japanese destroyer in question was not Fubikim but Fubuki (blizzard), which would be sunk at the Battle of Cape Esperance a few months later.
13 posted on 06/14/2014 2:07:28 PM PDT by Fiji Hill
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To: llevrok

My father was the Chief Signalman on Huston. Just before her last deployment another Chief Signalman also was given orders for Huston. They flipped a coin to determine who would get their orders changed. My dad lost and got his orders changed. Not being with the ship on her final mission haunted him his whole life. Something like survivors guilt.


14 posted on 06/14/2014 2:44:03 PM PDT by Nuc 1.1 (Nuc 1 Liberals aren't Patriots. Remember 1789!)
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To: llevrok

While you’re at it,read a book about Harry S. Truman’s”lost Cruiser”,The USS Indianapolis!Her crew were”dined”on by sharks while The US Navy IGNORED her!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


15 posted on 06/14/2014 2:45:47 PM PDT by bandleader
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To: Patton@Bastogne

The”Long Lance”was “Deadly”while ours were so”Top Secret”that Bu-Ord Never checked them to see if the”magnetic-exploders”REALLY worked!!!!!!!!!


16 posted on 06/14/2014 2:48:25 PM PDT by bandleader
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To: buwaya
Houston was already severely damaged from a previous battle.

My dad's ship the Marblehead was fighting for it's survival after that battle.

17 posted on 06/14/2014 3:11:34 PM PDT by ansel12 ((Ted Cruz and Mike Lee-both of whom sit on the Senate Judiciary Comm as Ginsberg's importance fades)
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To: GrouchoTex

Title: U.S.S. Houston Monument
Artist: Jeff Ryan
Date: 1998
Type: Monument
Medium: Granite
Location: Sam Houston Park

The U.S.S. Houston Monument incorporates the brass ship’s bell recovered from the wreck of the U.S.S. Houston, which has been placed atop a granite pedestal. It is the scene of an annual commemoration of the sailors who died in the sinking of the Houston in the Sunda Strait, March 1, 1942, by the Japanese Navy. Of the 1, 068 men on board, 700 died, and the survivors were used as slave labor on the Burma Railroad. Many died before being liberated by the Allies in 1945. The names of the ship’s crew are written on the pedestal.

http://www.houstontx.gov/parks/artinparks/USShoustonmonument.html


18 posted on 06/14/2014 3:14:23 PM PDT by smokingfrog ( sleep with one eye open (<o> ---)
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To: BenLurkin

Second shot is of a later ship, the light cruiser Houston, CL-81 launched in 1943.
Interestingly the “light cruiser” displaced more (was a bigger ship) than the “heavy cruiser”.


19 posted on 06/14/2014 3:25:25 PM PDT by buwaya
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To: BenLurkin

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMAS_Perth_(D29)


20 posted on 06/14/2014 3:47:06 PM PDT by packrat35 (Pelosi is only on loan to the world from Satan. Hopefully he will soon want his baby killer back)
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To: Patton@Bastogne

Thanks for mentioning “Neptune’s Inferno”. I’ve read the previous two books by this author and liked them. I am now looking forward to “Inferno”

-llevrok


21 posted on 06/14/2014 3:59:24 PM PDT by llevrok (Straight. Since 1950.)
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To: bandleader
The US Navy IGNORED her

Note that they did not ignore the captain upon his rescue and return to the States. Sick War Dept.bastards court martialed him for their F up. So considerate.

22 posted on 06/14/2014 4:06:35 PM PDT by llevrok (Straight. Since 1950.)
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To: llevrok

The captain of the Japanese sub that sunk the Indy was brought in to testify at the court martial. That made me sick to hear many decades later. That had to have a role in his eventual suicide.


23 posted on 06/14/2014 6:10:39 PM PDT by NCC-1701 (I am proud of what America USED TO BE.)
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To: buwaya

I don’t think they were making an attack as such the Houston and the Perth, along with a Dutch destroyer were all that remained of the Allied navy and they were making a run around the west Java coast down through the Sunda Strait (site of the Krakatoa volcano) from Batavia (Jakarta) to Australia.

They simply had the misfortune to run slap bang into the main Japanese invading force which annihilated them.


24 posted on 06/14/2014 6:18:23 PM PDT by PotatoHeadMick
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To: Jacquerie

The Japanese Navy’s tactics were superb using searchlights and torpedoes they wiped out the three Allied vessels without the Allies laying a glove on them.

All the ships sunk in the action were sunk by the Japanese including the accidental sinking of a Japanese troop carrier. I believe later that the captain of the destroyer who sank the troopship came to the troopship’s captain to apologise for his error, understandable in the heat of battle, the trooper’s captain silenced him and told him that he would prefer to allow the Houston to have the honour of the sinking.


25 posted on 06/14/2014 6:22:48 PM PDT by PotatoHeadMick
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To: Jacquerie

It was a combination of tactics and training. Prior to Pearl Harbor and during the early days of the war, many of our ships were crewed by recent conscripts—that’s one reason that Admiral Kimmel’s predecessor as CINCPAC, Admiral J.O. Richardson fought with FDR to move the bulk of the fleet back to San Diego. He knew we needed time to train, and we would lose a lot of engagements until the training gap was closed.

Of course, we did have a few things going for us. Commanders like Halsey and Ray Spruance were first-rate; our aircrews developed tactics to lessen the Zero’s advantage until the F6F Hellcat became available, and Japan simply couldn’t match our advantage in war production.

Still, we paid a heavy price until the tide began to turn. The naval campaign that accompanied the invasion of Guadalcanal is a case in point. The first naval battle of Guadalcanal was a tactical disaster; the Admiral leading our forces, Daniel Callaghan, had ships with the latest radar, but put them in the back of the formation. He never issued a battle plan and had difficulty recognizing what the Japanese were doing and issuing orders to his command.

With IJN forces (under Admiral Abe) split into multiple columns, portions of the U.S. force found themselves caught between two Japanese elements. At one point, Callaghan issued the order, “Odd ships fire to starboard, even ships to port.” With the lack of pre-engagement planning, no one could discern which ships in the chaos were “odd” or “even.”

Admiral Callaghan was killed during the engagement (along with much of his staff) when a shell struck his flagship, the USS San Francisco. Command (literally) passed to a Lieutenant Commander named Bruce McCandless, who, along with the captain of the USS Helena, managed to lead the decimated U.S. formation through the rest of the battle.

Incidentally, Callaghan’s assignment before arriving in the Pacific was as naval aide to President Roosevelt, a job he got on the recommendation of the commander-in-chief’s military physician. Callaghan was a brave man who gave his life for his country, but you can argue he was the wrong man for leading our forces in that epic battle.

I’ve heard the Callaghan was commander because he had one month seniority over Admiral Norman Scott, who had more combat experience and also died in the battle.


26 posted on 06/14/2014 6:59:08 PM PDT by ExNewsExSpook
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To: smokingfrog

Yes, I have seen that one also.


27 posted on 06/15/2014 3:25:17 PM PDT by GrouchoTex (...and ye shall know the Truth and the Truth shall set you free....)
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To: Patton@Bastogne

long lance torpedoes were excellent offensive but this came at a cost. the propellant was more explosive than USN torpedoes so main gun hits in the torpedo bays of an IJN cruiser would cause larger secondary explosions and considerable more damage.


28 posted on 07/15/2014 10:31:28 AM PDT by bravo whiskey (we shouldn't fear the government. the government should fear us.)
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