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Unintended Consequences: Fly-Ash Shortage (Vanity)
6/15/2014 | BwanaNdege

Posted on 06/15/2014 12:07:35 PM PDT by BwanaNdege

I went to two different local concrete ready-mix plants on Friday, looking to get a small quantity (two buckets) of fly-ash for an R&D project. Both places mentioned the shortage of fly ash.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Chit/Chat
KEYWORDS: coal; construction; energy
For those you you not familiar with fly-ash, here is a bit of information:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fly_ash

"Fly ash, also known as flue-ash, is one of the residues generated in combustion, and comprises the fine particles that rise with the flue gases. Ash which does not rise is termed bottom ash. In an industrial context, fly ash usually refers to ash produced during combustion of coal. Fly ash is generally captured by electrostatic precipitators or other particle filtration equipment before the flue gases reach the chimneys of coal-fired power plants, and together with bottom ash removed from the bottom of the furnace is in this case jointly known as coal ash."

"In the US, fly ash is generally stored at coal power plants or placed in landfills. About 43% is recycled,[3] often used as a pozzolan to produce hydraulic cement or hydraulic plaster or a partial replacement for Portland cement in concrete production."

Obama's War on Coal has led to a shortage of fly ash which is used in Concrete to replace a portion of the Portland cement. Now in order to make the needed quantity of concrete, more Portland cement must be manufactured, producing even more CO2, to replace the missing Fly-Ash. Concrete made with Fly-Ash is generally better than that made without it.

"The Law of Unintended Consequences" once again bites the Progressives/Liberals/Eco-Freaks/Democrats.

1 posted on 06/15/2014 12:07:35 PM PDT by BwanaNdege
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To: BwanaNdege
Typical liberal non-thinking. You can't expect them to actually know how things work.

/johnny

2 posted on 06/15/2014 12:15:09 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: BwanaNdege

LOLOLOL! The idiots are running the asylum!


3 posted on 06/15/2014 12:16:09 PM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: BwanaNdege
no coal, no coal ash... what a concept, prolly comes as a surprise to the RATS tooo
4 posted on 06/15/2014 12:19:04 PM PDT by Chode (Stand UP and Be Counted, or line up and be numbered - *DTOM* -vvv- NO Pity for the LAZY - 86-44)
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To: BwanaNdege

There is a lot to this. I’ve seen a highway project have to stop because a power plant wasn’t putting out enough fly ash quick enough.


5 posted on 06/15/2014 12:25:08 PM PDT by FlingWingFlyer (Obama's smidgens are coming home to roost.)
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To: BwanaNdege

Dirka dirka jihad! Aloha snackbar!!! Your destruction is coming.

6 posted on 06/15/2014 12:33:59 PM PDT by TigersEye ("No man left behind" means something different to 0bama.)
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To: JRandomFreeper

“Oh, come on. You didn’t really expect us to get our hands dirty with such details, right? This is something for low-level techs to figure out. They always do. We’ve been coasting, riding on the backs of these people our entire short lives”.

—Typical Obama Administration Policy Wonk


7 posted on 06/15/2014 12:42:24 PM PDT by The Antiyuppie ("When small men cast long shadows, then it is very late in the day.")
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To: BwanaNdege

The Chinese will marvel at our fantastic stupidity, with selling them coal, and then paying for the ash from it after it’s burned!


8 posted on 06/15/2014 12:45:27 PM PDT by The Antiyuppie ("When small men cast long shadows, then it is very late in the day.")
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To: BwanaNdege

There is a large pile of fly ash not far from here. We used to set fence posts in it as it alone hardened up just like concrete.


9 posted on 06/15/2014 1:09:29 PM PDT by Ruy Dias de Bivar (Sometimes you need more than seven rounds, Much more.)
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To: BwanaNdege

Whole bunch of it is here...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingston_Fossil_Plant_coal_fly_ash_slurry_spill


10 posted on 06/15/2014 1:26:32 PM PDT by HangnJudge
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To: BwanaNdege

China Extracts Metallurgical Grade Aluminum Ore from Coal Ash
http://www.wvcoal.com/research-development/china-extracts-metallurgical-grade-aluminum-ore-from-coal-ash.html


11 posted on 06/15/2014 1:27:19 PM PDT by familyop (We Baby Boomers are croaking in an avalanche of corruption smelled around the planet.)
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To: BwanaNdege
Concrete made with Fly-Ash is generally better than that made without it

Hmmm... Not sure about this in all cases, I am a structural drafter and seems like many times our general structural notes specify concrete without fly-ash... Not sure exactly why though. For some reason I thought it was a byproduct of steel mills, not from coal, but I must be thinking of something else. I do know years ago during the construction boom, we have been importing portland cement from Mexico and break results showed it was not equal and was very hard to get a good finish on the slab if the mexican cement was used too.
12 posted on 06/15/2014 1:48:59 PM PDT by AzNASCARfan
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To: AzNASCARfan

“...generally better...”

“All precast concrete producers can now use a group of materials called “fly ash” to improve the quality and durability of their products. Fly ash improves concrete’s workability, pumpability, cohesiveness, finish, ultimate strength, and durability as well as solves many problems experienced with concrete today–and all for less cost. Fly ash, however, must be used with care. Without adequate knowledge of its use and taking proper precautions, problems can result in mixing, setting time, strength development, and durability.”

http://precast.org/2010/05/using-fly-ash-in-concrete/


13 posted on 06/15/2014 1:54:28 PM PDT by BwanaNdege ( "For those who have fought for it, Life bears a savor the protected will never know")
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To: AzNASCARfan

I helped set up a coal-fueled industrial plant. The fly-ash was much desired for roads.

http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/pavement/recycling/fach02.cfm


14 posted on 06/15/2014 1:55:07 PM PDT by jjotto ("Ya could look it up!")
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To: BwanaNdege

If you are doing High Strength Concrete R&D, look for “Silica Fume”. I participated (and won) the regional ACI High Strength Concrete competition for my school years and years ago...

Aside from the a Coarse Aggregate and Fine Aggregate (sand) you want Silica Fume, and the most critical thing is a low Water/Cement ratio... which can only be accomplished by adding a Superplasticizer.

The Fly Ash/ Silica Fume component is included with the Portland Type II as Cement in the W/C ratio... and what it does is imparts a charge to the cement particles so when the water is added, the particles space themselves out in the matrix.

Look for your base strength to be 8ksi... anything more is bonus.


15 posted on 06/15/2014 2:35:10 PM PDT by Rodamala
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To: BwanaNdege
Now in order to make the needed quantity of concrete, more Portland cement must be manufactured, producing even more CO2

C)2 is a known as a problem in Al Gore's religion, but the rest of us recognize it as food for plants.

16 posted on 06/15/2014 2:43:35 PM PDT by IncPen (None of this would be happening if John Boehner were alive...)
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To: BwanaNdege
Now in order to make the needed quantity of concrete, more Portland cement must be manufactured, producing even more CO2, to replace the missing Fly-Ash.

Oh, don't worry. They'll be coming after them next. My employer (a cement manufacturer) is already making plans.

17 posted on 06/15/2014 3:04:25 PM PDT by uglybiker (nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-BATMAN!)
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To: TigersEye

How I detest this shoddy excuse for a man!


18 posted on 06/15/2014 3:08:00 PM PDT by Rollee
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To: AzNASCARfan
well it may have come from the steel mills coal furnaces
19 posted on 06/15/2014 5:02:33 PM PDT by Chode (Stand UP and Be Counted, or line up and be numbered - *DTOM* -vvv- NO Pity for the LAZY - 86-44)
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To: The Antiyuppie

The Chinese (and the U.S.) also make drywall using fly-ash, so while U.S. drywall production from coal fired powerplant wastes goes down the price will go up - and the Chinese will make even more.

Yes - there are always unintended consequences - but this (less fly-ash available in the US, reliance on China increased as they have increased the number of Coal fired plants and thus fly ash tremendously) may actually be an intended consequence.


20 posted on 06/15/2014 5:47:11 PM PDT by LibertyOh
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To: Rodamala
It's tough to nominate a generic fly ash because each coal seam has distinct chemistry. A low ash fusion coal will produce an entirely different ash than a high ash fusion coal. Clinkers don't always come in small pea or nut sized shapes; a local power plant had to shut down for several weeks while the pick-up sized clinker cooled down enough so a crew could enter the combustion chamber and drill, shoot, and load it out. Obviously, some of the minerals in the coal were no longer evident in the fly ash.

As an aside. several years back the epa ruled that solid components - the ash and fly ash - after combustion were to be considered emissions. It doesn't take long for a high quality steam coal, with 10% ash content, to produce a boat load of HAZMAT emissions.

As for Silica Fume, yes, it absolutely increases the strength of concrete, irrespective of the fly ash component. I'm sure it effects the compressive strength, but I don't have any idea how to plug in the numbers to determine if the rebar components should be adjusted to reflect a change in the tensile strength. Our engineers always added the Silica Fume just before the pour to manage the final product. Myself, I would add a bit if I were pouring a patio or foundation for a house. Just be darn sure to wear a well fitting respirator with an NBC filter while handling the bags.

21 posted on 06/15/2014 6:33:38 PM PDT by kitchen (Even the walls have ears.)
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