Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

16 Photos: Seattle Waterfront Classic Boasts Wooden Yachts, Speedboats
KOMO News ^ | 15 June 2014

Posted on 06/16/2014 9:41:16 AM PDT by zeestephen

More than 50 classic wooden vessels, many of them built prior to World War II, are on display at the Bell Street Pier Classic Rendezvous, part of the Seattle Waterfront Classic Weekend.

(Excerpt) Read more at komonews.com ...


TOPICS: Chit/Chat
KEYWORDS: washingtonstate

1 posted on 06/16/2014 9:41:16 AM PDT by zeestephen
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: zeestephen

I just love the look of these (old?) ChrisCrafts, though I bet the wood makes 'em pretty high maintenance.

Do they even still make these?

2 posted on 06/16/2014 9:48:18 AM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: martin_fierro

http://www.antiqueboat.com/


3 posted on 06/16/2014 9:50:11 AM PDT by nascarnation (Toxic Baraq Syndrome: hopefully infecting a Dem candidate near you)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: martin_fierro

I’m not a boat guy but me too. Arent they stupidly expensive for what they are? Something rings a bell about that.


4 posted on 06/16/2014 9:52:27 AM PDT by Norm Lenhart (How's that 'lesser evil' workin' out for ya?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: martin_fierro

my pops had a Grand Banks. Yes wood makes for maintenance - teak wood is great but the whole boat wasn’t teak.

Awesome boat it was though.


5 posted on 06/16/2014 9:54:38 AM PDT by Principled (Obama: Unblemished by success.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: martin_fierro

You just made me think of a program I saw on History Channel (I think it was History) where Chris Craft uses 9mm bullet projectiles for ballast in their boats.


6 posted on 06/16/2014 9:57:25 AM PDT by Rappini (Veritas vos Liberabit)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Norm Lenhart

Remember the old saying: A boat is a hole in the water into which one pours money....


7 posted on 06/16/2014 10:03:02 AM PDT by BigIsleGal (Wake Me Up When the Stupid Wears Off)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: martin_fierro

Yes they still make those down in Sarasota FL.


8 posted on 06/16/2014 10:11:03 AM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: BigIsleGal

Thats what I hear. But I can’t judge too harshly as I have put asinine amounts of money/time into the desert version...off-road trucks/race trucks/buggies.

One shock absorber...#2000. Really need 8.

Ah the good old days ...now long gone...and the money with it. But the memories were worth every penny ;)


9 posted on 06/16/2014 10:13:38 AM PDT by Norm Lenhart (How's that 'lesser evil' workin' out for ya?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: zeestephen
The closest thing you can have to a continuous financial drain on your bank account is a WOODEN boat. The upkeep is on going and continuous. Fall behind and the cost to remedy the problem is staggering. I know because a friend of mine in the Port Ludlow area near Seattle has an 83-foot Wheeler. The Wheeler is an ex-USCG cutter (CG-83527) and was built during WW2.

On 29 June 2007, CG-83527 ran over a submerged obstacle that punched a hole in the lazerette and led to flooding. After the war against the flooding was won and the temporary patch held, the boat was pulled out for real repairs. only then did all its problems come to light. Here: http://www.cg83527.org/83527crunch.htm

The watertight bulkhead between the lazerette and engine room had been removed — it was replaced. One of the props was destroyed and the other dinged; one shaft and support were misaligned and the area around one of the rudder posts was damaged. The underwater hull needed extensive replanking below the chine. The list seemed to grow like Topsy. Fortunately, Dan had some very enthusiastic volunteers, good insurance that covered most of the repairs (but not all of them), and a marina that let them work on their boat while it was out of the water.

On 3 November 2007, CG-83527 left the marina and arrived at her permanent berth in Everett, WA.

CG-83527 is repaired and restored. She proudly takes her place by these other classic boats. However, maintenance and repair remains on going.

10 posted on 06/16/2014 10:20:30 AM PDT by MasterGunner01
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: zeestephen

It’s magnificent to see these wonderful old boats, especially when you think “Wow, I am SOOOOO glad that isn’t mine!”

The old wooden Chris Crafts are simply beautiful creations.

It hurts just thinking about the maintenance on these things!


11 posted on 06/16/2014 1:00:57 PM PDT by Attention Surplus Disorder (At no time was the Obama administration aware of what the Obama administration was doing)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Attention Surplus Disorder
Re: “Wow, I am SOOOOO glad that isn’t mine!”

I grew up in South Florida.

The shared joke among boat owners back then was that your boat is “a hole in the water you pour all your money into.”

12 posted on 06/16/2014 1:08:23 PM PDT by zeestephen
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: MasterGunner01

That’s a terrific web page.

Thanks for posting.


13 posted on 06/16/2014 1:14:37 PM PDT by zeestephen
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: MasterGunner01

Good catch.


14 posted on 06/16/2014 1:50:52 PM PDT by First_Salute (May God save our democratic-republican government, from a government by judiciary.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: zeestephen
Here is the link to the whole site: http://www.cg83527.org/index.html.

The 83-foot Wheelers were used as Antisubmarine Warfare [ASW] escorts for convoys in U.S. coastal waters during WW2. Armament was a Mk 10 Oerlikon auto cannon in 20x110R [millimeters], eight Mk 6 depth charges (4x2) in roll off racks, two P&S on the stern and two P&S amidships. Some cutters carried the Mk 22 “Mousetrap” 7.2-inch projector charge in a simple folding launch rack. The Mousetrap projectile was similar in size and weight to the Hedgehog projectile except for the propellant. The Mousetrap used a solid rocket motor and the Hedgehog used a black powder impulse charge. The heavy recoil [40 tons] transmitted to the deck made Hedgehog impractical for small ASW craft like the Wheelers and so the Mousetrap round was developed that had no recoil. Mousetrap projectiles were laid in the launch troughs when the launch rails were erected. Firing was done by an electrical contact switch on the bridge. Sixteen (16) rounds were carried. The Mousetrap projectile had a spinning vane that armed its contact fuze as it flew through the air. The projectile detonated on contact with a submarine or solid object.

15 posted on 06/16/2014 2:30:05 PM PDT by MasterGunner01
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: MasterGunner01

That’s one full step up from Ernest Hemingway.

As I recall, he and a couple drinking buddies patrolled around Cuba in a charter fishing boat, armed with whiskey, beer, and several hunting rifles.

He converted the experience into a short story, or maybe a novel (Islands in the Stream?).


16 posted on 06/16/2014 2:48:22 PM PDT by zeestephen
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: zeestephen

I vaguely recall WANDERER...didn't she circumnavigate, coming near Antarctica, with Capt. Beebe at the helm?

17 posted on 06/16/2014 8:07:33 PM PDT by Rudder
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Rudder
I looked up “William Beebe” on Wikipedia.

He was an explorer and a naturalist and traveled extensively in the first half of the 20th Century.

I scanned the long article for “Wanderer” and “Antarctica,” but no hits.

Wanderer I - Wanderer IV come up on Google as Antarctic exploration ships, but it looks like at least two of them sank, and no link to Beebe that I see on a quick search.

Nonetheless, that's a beautiful boat in the picture, and could make a man dream about exploring the world.

18 posted on 06/16/2014 8:34:47 PM PDT by zeestephen
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: zeestephen

I goofed up on many of the details, but did recall her course correctly.

19 posted on 06/16/2014 8:35:26 PM PDT by Rudder
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: zeestephen

How 'bout Car & Boat?

20 posted on 06/16/2014 8:37:44 PM PDT by Liberty Valance (Keep a simple manner for a happy life :o)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Liberty Valance

“Woody” tows “Woody.”

Awesome!


21 posted on 06/16/2014 8:39:40 PM PDT by zeestephen
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: zeestephen

Great design is timeless.

22 posted on 06/16/2014 9:49:44 PM PDT by Liberty Valance (Keep a simple manner for a happy life :o)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: martin_fierro

my son has a 39 Hackercraft runabout he wants to sell. Been in the family since the 50s and he takes it out every year on the Detroit River....Wants to get into sailing, passed all his tests from the Coast Guard...Just finished putting 2 new coats of (whatever they put on boats) maybe varnish. Runs great, if interested freepmail me.. (hope this isn’t against the rules) Built in Michigan. Real antiques that runs good


23 posted on 06/16/2014 9:57:01 PM PDT by goat granny
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Liberty Valance

Jim Wright of Cottage Grove, Oregon built a full scale replica of the H-1 that first flew in 2002. So exact was the replica to the original that the FAA granted it serial number 2 of the model. The achievement in recreating the aircraft was heralded in virtually every well-known aviation magazine of the time.[12] On August 4, 2003, after a successful unveiling of the replica at the 2003 AirVenture at Oshkosh, Wisconsin, Wright fatally crashed. On his way home to Oregon, he had landed briefly in Gillette, Wyoming, to refuel. While on the ground, Wright met briefly with local reporters and indicated that the aircraft had been having propeller “gear problems.” He then departed, crashing just north of the Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park about an hour later. The replica, originally slated for use in the film The Aviator, was completely destroyed, and Wright was killed.[13] [N 3] The official accident report points to a failure of a counterweight on the constant speed propeller.[15] On December 17, 2003, Cottage Grove State Airport was dedicated as Jim Wright Field.


24 posted on 06/16/2014 10:18:31 PM PDT by Moonman62 (The US has become a government with a country, rather than a country with a government.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: Moonman62

Yes I know. Tragic.


25 posted on 06/16/2014 10:32:58 PM PDT by Liberty Valance (Keep a simple manner for a happy life :o)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: Nailbiter

for later read


26 posted on 06/16/2014 11:54:25 PM PDT by Nailbiter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Liberty Valance

Beautiful.

What is it?

It doesn’t look like a P-51 Mustang, which is probably the only single seat prop driven aircraft I might be able to recognize on sight.


27 posted on 06/17/2014 9:44:45 AM PDT by zeestephen
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: zeestephen

The Hughes Racer.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hughes_H-1_Racer


28 posted on 06/17/2014 10:22:39 AM PDT by Liberty Valance (Keep a simple manner for a happy life :o)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson