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Mysterious Earthen Rings Predate Amazon Rainforest
Live Science ^ | July 07, 2014 03:37pm ET | Stephanie Pappas

Posted on 07/10/2014 12:35:30 PM PDT by BenLurkin

Carson and his colleagues wanted to explore the question of whether early Amazonians had a major impact on the forest. They focused on the Amazon of northeastern Bolivia, where they had sediment cores from two lakes nearby major earthworks sites. These sediment cores hold ancient pollen grains and charcoal from long-ago fires, and can hint at the climate and ecosystem that existed when the sediment was laid down as far back as 6,000 years ago.

An examination of the two cores — one from the large lake, Laguna Oricore, and one from the smaller lake, Laguna Granja — revealed a surprise: The very oldest sediments didn't come from a rainforest ecosystem at all. In fact, the Bolivian Amazon before about 2,000 to 3,000 years ago looked more like the savannas of Africa than today's jungle environment.

The question had been whether the early Amazon was highly deforested or barely touched, Carson said.

"The surprising thing we found was that it was neither," he told Live Science. "It was this third scenario where, when people first arrived on the landscape, the climate was drier."

The pollen in this time period came mostly from grasses and a few drought-resistant species of trees. After about 2,000 years ago, more and more tree pollen appears in the samples, including fewer drought-resistant species and more evergreens, the researchers report today (July 7) in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Charcoal levels also went down, indicating a less-fire-prone landscape. These changes were largely driven by an increase in precipitation, Carson said.

The earthworks predate this shift, which reveals that the diggers of these ditches created them before the forest moved in around them

(Excerpt) Read more at livescience.com ...


TOPICS: History; Science
KEYWORDS: africa; agriculture; amazon; amazonrainforest; animalhusbandry; annaroosevelt; bolivia; brazil; climate; climatechange; drought; globalwarminghoax; godsgravesglyphs; preclovis; sahara; slashandburn; terrapreta; theamazon
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1 posted on 07/10/2014 12:35:31 PM PDT by BenLurkin
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To: BenLurkin

They predate the rain forest. Maybe they were just building elevated positions for better fields of fire.


2 posted on 07/10/2014 12:39:17 PM PDT by 17th Miss Regt
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To: BenLurkin; SunkenCiv
Of interest?

FMCDH(BITS)

3 posted on 07/10/2014 12:40:14 PM PDT by nothingnew (Hemmer and MacCullum are the worst on FNC)
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To: BenLurkin

Cataclysmic astrobleme ping.


4 posted on 07/10/2014 12:44:22 PM PDT by SpaceBar
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To: BenLurkin
Can't be. We've been told that the Amazon rain forest has a bazillion specialized species that have taken a million years (at least) to evolve.

Are these scientists now telling us that all that bio diversity came into being in a mere 6,000 years?

5 posted on 07/10/2014 12:48:14 PM PDT by SampleMan (Feral Humans are the refuse of socialism.)
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To: BenLurkin

So if the jungle went away again, it’s normal and we won’t all die?


6 posted on 07/10/2014 12:50:53 PM PDT by UnbelievingScumOnTheOtherSide (HELL, NO! BE UNGOVERNABLE! --- ISLAM DELENDA EST)
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To: BenLurkin

7 posted on 07/10/2014 12:52:57 PM PDT by servo1969
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To: BenLurkin; blam

It has been my opinion for many years that we know very little about mans past, let alone the world in detail.

Most of what I have seen as revealed science and predictions of the future and past are uneducated guesses based on fragmentary evidence.


8 posted on 07/10/2014 12:54:13 PM PDT by Little Bill (EVICT Queen Jean)
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To: SampleMan

>Are these scientists now telling us that all that bio diversity came into being in a mere 6,000 years?

And they are telling you that if one thing changes in the next 6000, we’re all gonna die.


9 posted on 07/10/2014 12:54:33 PM PDT by UnbelievingScumOnTheOtherSide (HELL, NO! BE UNGOVERNABLE! --- ISLAM DELENDA EST)
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To: BenLurkin
"It's very likely, in fact, that people had some kind of effect on the composition of the forest," Carson said. "People might favor edible species, growing in orchards and things like that, [or] altered the soils, changing the soil chemistry and composition, which can have a longer-lasting legacy effect."

Gee, really honey child?

You mean that when you have fruit producing trees in a percentage that is several hundred percent over any other "wild forest" in the world that might be a sign that people planted them?

And soil does not naturally have pot shards and charcoal pounded into it? Well, who knew!

10 posted on 07/10/2014 1:02:44 PM PDT by Harmless Teddy Bear (Proud Infidel, Gun Nut, Religious Fanatic and Freedom Fiend)
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To: UnbelievingScumOnTheOtherSide

Bush’s Fault


11 posted on 07/10/2014 1:05:17 PM PDT by Craftmore
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To: BenLurkin

The key point is that man has been radically altering the “natural” landscape for as long as he has been Man. Famously, aboriginal Australians had the whole place on fire at various times of the year - it increased the productivity, “naturally”.

Fire was the chief tool of landscape management; that’s why we should celebrate Earth Day with fire - lots of fires - it’s a good time of year to burn the ditches and such. ;^)


12 posted on 07/10/2014 1:07:28 PM PDT by headsonpikes (Mass murder and cannibalism are the twin sacraments of socialism - "Who-whom?"-Lenin)
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To: BenLurkin
The very oldest sediments didn't come from a rainforest ecosystem at all. In fact, the Bolivian Amazon before about 2,000 to 3,000 years ago looked more like the savannas of Africa than today's jungle environment.

Glowbull Warming! It's retroactive now.

13 posted on 07/10/2014 1:10:33 PM PDT by TigersEye ("No man left behind" means something different to 0bama.)
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To: BenLurkin
Since the 1980s, however, deforestation has revealed massive earthworks in the form of ditches up to 16 feet (5 meters) deep, and often just as wide.

That sounds like a fortification, and a pretty substantial one. I wonder if they have found destruction layers, mass graves, etc., and whether we should expect to find much of that nature given the present climate.

14 posted on 07/10/2014 2:21:56 PM PDT by sphinx
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To: BenLurkin
In fact, the Bolivian Amazon before about 2,000 to 3,000 years ago looked more like the savannas of Africa than today's jungle environment.

Now let me get this straight. It is said that the Amazonian rainforest contains plant and animal species found nowhere else in the world (save the rainforest). If the rainforest is only 2,000-3,000 years old is that enough time to evolve these unique species?

15 posted on 07/10/2014 3:19:14 PM PDT by Mike Darancette (Do The Math)
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To: BenLurkin

Does this mean to imply... that the climate might have changed?

No.


16 posted on 07/10/2014 3:56:07 PM PDT by Sequoyah101
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To: Little Bill
Most of what I have seen as revealed science and predictions of the future and past are uneducated guesses based on fragmentary evidence.

Ice ages remove most evidence or make it unrecognizable. Imagine hail the size of cantaloupes traveling toward the ground at 100 mph. It is starting to happen again.

17 posted on 07/10/2014 4:37:03 PM PDT by justa-hairyape (The user name is sarcastic. Although at times it may not appear that way.)
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To: nothingnew; BenLurkin; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; ...
These have appeared as FR topics as well: Thanks nothingnew for the ping, thanks BenLurkin for posting the topic.
These sediment cores hold ancient pollen grains and charcoal from long-ago fires, and can hint at the climate and ecosystem that existed when the sediment was laid down as far back as 6,000 years ago. An examination of the two cores — one from the large lake, Laguna Oricore, and one from the smaller lake, Laguna Granja — revealed a surprise: The very oldest sediments didn't come from a rainforest ecosystem at all. In fact, the Bolivian Amazon before about 2,000 to 3,000 years ago looked more like the savannas of Africa than today's jungle environment.

18 posted on 07/10/2014 8:42:48 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Mike Darancette

I would imagine that the 2000 to 3000 years ago (I wonder if they meant 3000 years BC, since the cores go back 6000 years), the rainforests were just in a different place. Say SW North America which is now desert. As the climate changes in various places, the species (plants, animals, birds, etc.) just follow.

I recall reading some National Geographic article years ago. One article was about some animal that is being more and more rare in the U.S. due to Global Warming, and something needs to be done, etc. (The article did bury the fact that they are just heading north into Canada).

In the same mag, another article was shouting with joy the sighting of some rare bird, the first time it has been seen in the states for 200 years, and people from all over were coming to see it. (It’s usual range was a few hundred miles south of the border in Mexico. No mention of global warming).


19 posted on 07/10/2014 9:21:53 PM PDT by 21twelve (http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2185147/posts 2013 is 1933 REBORN)
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To: 21twelve

I was watching on PBS within the last month, the reason the rainforests in the Amazon exist is due to the dust kicked up in the Sahara desert in Africa that travels around the world, creates rainclouds and drops.

We know that several thousand years ago the Sahara was no desert. And now we see that the Amazon was no rainforest around the same time.

Climate changes all on it’s own. Apparently alot.


20 posted on 07/10/2014 10:01:33 PM PDT by Free Vulcan (Vote Republican! You can vote Democrat when you're dead...)
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