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30 Writers Other Writers Loved To Hate
BuzzFeed ^ | July 8, 2014 | Arianna Rebolini

Posted on 07/18/2014 11:34:05 AM PDT by EveningStar

30 Writers Other Writers Loved To Hate

(Excerpt) Read more at buzzfeed.com ...


TOPICS: Books/Literature; Chit/Chat; Society
KEYWORDS: authors; writers; writing
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1 posted on 07/18/2014 11:34:06 AM PDT by EveningStar
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To: Borges

ping


2 posted on 07/18/2014 11:34:25 AM PDT by EveningStar
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To: EveningStar

Now really, there is always some writer, somewhere, who thinks some other writers are drek, it’s called “diversity”.


3 posted on 07/18/2014 11:36:21 AM PDT by tet68 ( " We would not die in that man's company, that fears his fellowship to die with us...." Henry V.)
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To: EveningStar

Pretty good company. There’s probably a similar list for “Politicians that other politicians love to hate”


4 posted on 07/18/2014 11:38:51 AM PDT by bigbob (The best way to get a bad law repealed is to enforce it strictly. Abraham Lincoln)
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To: bigbob

[ Pretty good company. There’s probably a similar list for “Politicians that other politicians love to hate” ]

Palin and Cruz would be at the top of that honored list....


5 posted on 07/18/2014 11:42:02 AM PDT by GraceG (No, My Initials are not A.B.)
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To: EveningStar

a brilliant piece.

I love how they have a damning comment from one writer, and then that writer is the subject of condemnation in the next entry....


6 posted on 07/18/2014 11:43:04 AM PDT by ConservativeDude
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To: EveningStar
As catty as the cool girls table in a junior high cafeteria.

I especially liked this one:

“Have you ever heard of anyone who drank while he worked? You’re thinking of Faulkner. He does sometimes – and I can tell right in the middle of a page when he’s had his first one.” — Ernest Hemingway

7 posted on 07/18/2014 11:45:59 AM PDT by KarlInOhio (The IRS: either criminally irresponsible in backup procedures or criminally responsible of coverup.)
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To: EveningStar

For Hemingway to criticize Faulkner for drinking while he wrote is laughable. Most of the World War II war correspondents couldn’t stand Hemingway.


8 posted on 07/18/2014 11:47:41 AM PDT by laplata (Liberals don't get it .... their minds are diseased.)
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To: EveningStar
This list is meaningless if John Steinbeck isn't on it.

That Grapes of Wrath book is the most ridiculous piece of commie propaganda I ever read.

It's bad enough that I'm sure they still make the kids read it in school.

9 posted on 07/18/2014 11:48:57 AM PDT by j. earl carter
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To: KarlInOhio

Yes, what a slob Hemingway was.


10 posted on 07/18/2014 11:49:38 AM PDT by laplata (Liberals don't get it .... their minds are diseased.)
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To: j. earl carter

It’s beautifully written. Most Marxist Literary types now regard it as anti-Communist.


11 posted on 07/18/2014 11:50:30 AM PDT by Borges
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To: laplata

When Zelda first met Hemmingway, she told her husband that Hemmingway was insane.

Later, Hemmingway told Fitzgerald that Zelda was insane.


12 posted on 07/18/2014 11:53:11 AM PDT by yarddog (Romans 8: verses 38 and 39. "For I am persuaded".)
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To: EveningStar

This piece is like listening to a family of incest participants stranded on an island somewhere and slowly going insane.


13 posted on 07/18/2014 11:53:55 AM PDT by pabianice (LINE)
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To: EveningStar

Surprised no one went after F. Scott Fitzgerald or Sinclair Lewis. Not that I don’t like them just that nobody took a shot.


14 posted on 07/18/2014 11:55:49 AM PDT by Starstruck (If my reply offends, you probably don't understand sarcasm or criticism...or do.)
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To: EveningStar

How was Norman Mailer left off the list?


15 posted on 07/18/2014 11:56:04 AM PDT by CaptainK (...please make it stop. Shake a can of pennies at it.)
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To: Starstruck

Lewis isn’t read enough today to merit attention in an article like this.


16 posted on 07/18/2014 11:57:36 AM PDT by Borges
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To: yarddog

Two peas in a pod. LOL

Thanks for the tidbit.


17 posted on 07/18/2014 12:00:05 PM PDT by laplata (Liberals don't get it .... their minds are diseased.)
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To: j. earl carter

If all you’ve ever read of Steinbeck is “Grapes of Wrath,” you ought to try reading Steinbeck.


18 posted on 07/18/2014 12:00:52 PM PDT by IronJack
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To: KarlInOhio

Faulkner was my first thought as well, although with Hemingway saying this the obvious thought is “It takes one to know one”.

Faulkner was an overrated, drunken hack who wrote to buy is next stock and store of booze. Little better than the same genre of “brilliant” reporters of his era.


19 posted on 07/18/2014 12:03:15 PM PDT by RJS1950 (The democrats are the "enemies foreign and domestic" cited in the federal oath)
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To: EveningStar
Mickey Spillane. Many "intellectual" writers hated his stuff yet his writing is absolutely compelling. Check it out. Spillane's writing is EXCELLENT.

"Her hips waved a happy hello."

20 posted on 07/18/2014 12:04:48 PM PDT by PJ-Comix (Boko Haram was enabled by Buku Huma)
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To: Borges
Lewis isn’t read enough today to merit attention in an article like this.

Interesting because I read Babbit a couple of years ago and was thinking of how similar politics and life are today as they were back in the 20's.

21 posted on 07/18/2014 12:05:38 PM PDT by Starstruck (If my reply offends, you probably don't understand sarcasm or criticism...or do.)
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To: laplata
In Spain, Hemingway was a commie apologist and drove John Dos Passos to the right and then tried to destroy him as a writer,
22 posted on 07/18/2014 12:06:13 PM PDT by Little Bill (EVICT Queen Jean)
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To: j. earl carter

All my friends think I m crazy but I like Steinbeck. He had a major shift in politics after his kid was KIA in Nam.


23 posted on 07/18/2014 12:09:11 PM PDT by Little Bill (EVICT Queen Jean)
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To: Little Bill

You’re right. Among other things, Hemingway drove an ambulance for the Lincoln Brigade, as I remember.

Hemingway was a pig.


24 posted on 07/18/2014 12:10:12 PM PDT by laplata (Liberals don't get it .... their minds are diseased.)
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To: EveningStar

Some of these aren’t necessarily put-downs. Waugh’s “desperate jauntiness of an orchestra fiddling away for dear life on a sinking ship” was a quality he wanted in his prose and something Wilson appreciated. The remarks about Pound and Orwell catch aspects of their personality that might not have affected Stein’s or Connolly’s appreciation of their work. Also, why the long awkward quote from Wallace about Updike when “just a penis with a thesaurus” does the job so much better.


25 posted on 07/18/2014 12:11:01 PM PDT by x
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To: EveningStar
All I got out of this list are that writers are catty.

Also, that Virginia Wolf was beautiful.


26 posted on 07/18/2014 12:12:18 PM PDT by TheThirdRuffian (RINOS like Romney, McCain, Christie are sure losers. No more!)
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To: IronJack

I suppose I should read more than one of the man’s books before dismissing him out of hand, but life is short. There are 100 years worth of back issues of Popular Science on Google Books that I haven’t gotten through yet. It could be awhile before I get around to “Of Mice and Men”.


27 posted on 07/18/2014 12:13:06 PM PDT by j. earl carter
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To: EveningStar
Re: Mark Twain:

“[A] hack writer who would not have been considered fourth rate in Europe, who tricked out a few of the old proven ‘sure fire’ literary skeletons with sufficient local color to intrigue the superficial and the lazy.” — William Faulkner

Only having read a few short stories by Faulkner, I tried one of his novels. Could not stand the schmaltzy prose. Faulkner does not stand the test of time like Twain does.

28 posted on 07/18/2014 12:14:18 PM PDT by DeFault User
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To: RJS1950

What Faulkner have you read? ‘Absalom, Absalom’ is the great American prose tragedy.


29 posted on 07/18/2014 12:15:31 PM PDT by Borges
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To: EveningStar

Great list,great fun.

.


30 posted on 07/18/2014 12:16:16 PM PDT by Mears
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To: DeFault User

Faulkner is as big now as he ever was. He’s a huge influence on writers all over the world.


31 posted on 07/18/2014 12:17:22 PM PDT by Borges
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To: laplata
He drove an ambulance for the Red Cross in Italy, in WW1. His only readable book, “The Sun Also Rises” reflected that time.

Other than that he was a ball sucking, self angrazing jerk looking for acceptance.

32 posted on 07/18/2014 12:17:28 PM PDT by Little Bill (EVICT Queen Jean)
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To: Little Bill

How about the short stories?


33 posted on 07/18/2014 12:19:17 PM PDT by Borges
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To: EveningStar

Truman Capote was a really weird little fellow but he sure could write.


34 posted on 07/18/2014 12:19:23 PM PDT by yarddog (Romans 8: verses 38 and 39. "For I am persuaded".)
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To: TheThirdRuffian
If you forgive her Fabian Socialism, Lesbianism, and being crazy as a sh#t house rat.
35 posted on 07/18/2014 12:21:38 PM PDT by Little Bill (EVICT Queen Jean)
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To: Borges

I can’t read him, his style turns me off.


36 posted on 07/18/2014 12:23:43 PM PDT by Little Bill (EVICT Queen Jean)
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To: Borges

After visiting Faulkner’s home (Rowan Oak) in Mississippi, I read “Old Man”.

A few years earlier, I had seen the Hallmark Hall Of Fame movie version of “old Man”.

Now I completely understand that a movie and the book will never be the same thing - but my problem was that I couldn’t get into to rhytm of reading Faulkner. His writing style just wan’t for me.


37 posted on 07/18/2014 12:24:28 PM PDT by MplsSteve
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To: Little Bill

He pretty much revolutionized English prose. All the pulp writers who came after him imitated him.


38 posted on 07/18/2014 12:24:55 PM PDT by Borges
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To: EveningStar

Besides being very entertaining, this article reminds me of just how competitive most these well known writers were. When all is said and done. they are but human, and don’t want to share the limelight too much. Today, such a list should include Anne Rice. and Steven King. Both very popular writers I tried to like, but found most their work almost “Proust-Like”, with endlessly entertwined monolouges spoken by somewhat disgusting Protaganists who elicited little empathy or sympathy from me. I was impressed with the stylization of their prose, some of it fine, flowery and florid. Nobody talks like that anymore, or if they do, it’s usually restricted to print form communique.


39 posted on 07/18/2014 12:25:56 PM PDT by lee martell
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To: MplsSteve

He created a diction like no other.


40 posted on 07/18/2014 12:26:10 PM PDT by Borges
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To: Borges

More than I ever cared to read. At least 2 in high school, 3 in college. My college professor did her dissertation on Faulkner. All of them forgettable. Flags in the Dust, The Town, Collected Stories were some of them. Mostly plodding, prodigious, regionally oriented prose that would bore a dullard to death. That said, to each his own.


41 posted on 07/18/2014 12:32:57 PM PDT by RJS1950 (The democrats are the "enemies foreign and domestic" cited in the federal oath)
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To: Borges
That is why you can't find any English prose in this day and age. Reminds me of Joyce in the early ‘70s, all the English Lit majors starting writing in imitation of the master.

They forgot that Joyce spoke five languages and had a view of Irish language and history. All of which was woven into his stories.

42 posted on 07/18/2014 12:33:39 PM PDT by Little Bill (EVICT Queen Jean)
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To: Borges

O Henry wrote some great short stories.


43 posted on 07/18/2014 12:36:52 PM PDT by laplata (Liberals don't get it .... their minds are diseased.)
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To: yarddog

I agree with you on Capote. My first exposure was “In Cold Blood”. Rereading some of the paragraphs I could see what artistry went into the sentence structure and words carefully chosen to create a scene, emotion or action. The man painted a paragraph like a great artist using an easel.


44 posted on 07/18/2014 12:38:33 PM PDT by DeFault User
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To: Little Bill

Thanks for clarifying that.


45 posted on 07/18/2014 12:40:14 PM PDT by laplata (Liberals don't get it .... their minds are diseased.)
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To: EveningStar

Bookmark


46 posted on 07/18/2014 12:40:26 PM PDT by BunnySlippers (I LOVE BULL MARKETS . . .)
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To: EveningStar

something about bells, balls and bulls, and loathed it.” — Vladimir Nabokov

LOL that’s wonderful.


47 posted on 07/18/2014 12:41:02 PM PDT by DManA
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To: Little Bill

Just talking looks here. She was a babe.


48 posted on 07/18/2014 12:41:18 PM PDT by TheThirdRuffian (RINOS like Romney, McCain, Christie are sure losers. No more!)
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To: Starstruck

I haven’t read the list, yet... but Twain’s take on James Fenimore Cooper is hilarious.


49 posted on 07/18/2014 12:48:13 PM PDT by Chasaway (Where are we going and why am I in this handbasket?)
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To: RJS1950

‘Flags in the Dust’ was written before he found his voice. You probably don’t like Joyce or Pynchon either I’m guessing.


50 posted on 07/18/2014 12:49:13 PM PDT by Borges
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