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What would be the real world problems with this car?
Gizmag ^ | Gizmag

Posted on 07/19/2014 9:06:26 PM PDT by Jonty30

Everything about the scene suggested that it might very well have been the last we heard of the NanoFlowcell Quant e-Sportlimousine. Promises of a magic bullet of energy storage, made by a three-month-old company, packaged with outlandish numbers like 0-62 mph (100 km/h) in 2.8 seconds and a top speed of 236 mph (380 km/h), hinted, rather strongly, that this car's technology and performance would only exist on paper. Given that a similarly outlandish Quant car, centered in a similar black-walled booth, introduced by a very different Nunzio La Vecchia company, had vaporized years earlier, it seemed a responsible assumption that the e-Sportlimousine would do the same.

(Excerpt) Read more at gizmag.com ...


TOPICS: Science
KEYWORDS: braking; car; chat; donate; saltwater; science
Although I'm not naïve enough to believe that theoretical lab result will result in equivalent real-world results, if car can really perform even 75% of what its creators are claiming is this a world changer?

Is there really enough energy contained in salt-water, even laboratory created salt-water to give these claimed performances.

Even if you can get a good level of performance from a car from this, would it work as well in a truck that needs diesel performance?

1 posted on 07/19/2014 9:06:26 PM PDT by Jonty30
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To: Jonty30

Breaking News?


2 posted on 07/19/2014 9:12:01 PM PDT by ButThreeLeftsDo (Please $upport Free Republic.)
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To: Jonty30

For the life of me, why does this get top billing in Breaking News?


3 posted on 07/19/2014 9:13:13 PM PDT by PapaNew (Freedom always wins the debate in the forum of ideas)
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To: ButThreeLeftsDo

There was no science category, which would have been my preference.


4 posted on 07/19/2014 9:13:18 PM PDT by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults)
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To: PapaNew

There wasn’t a science category to put it in. Sorry.


5 posted on 07/19/2014 9:13:50 PM PDT by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults)
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To: Jonty30

Science in CHAT


6 posted on 07/19/2014 9:13:54 PM PDT by ButThreeLeftsDo (Please $upport Free Republic.)
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To: ButThreeLeftsDo

Thank you. If somebody wants to move the thread, they can.


7 posted on 07/19/2014 9:14:17 PM PDT by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults)
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To: Jonty30

bfl


8 posted on 07/19/2014 9:14:26 PM PDT by ClearCase_guy ("Harvey Dent, can we trust him?" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HBsdV--kLoQ)
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To: Jonty30

He doesn’t expect to sell any cars nor does he even plan to go into production. This is PR to draw investors. If there were real-world benefits here he’d quietly make a deal with an established automaker.


9 posted on 07/19/2014 9:14:37 PM PDT by Squawk 8888 (Will steal your comments & post on Twitter)
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To: Squawk 8888

The claimed performance stats does seem to be way out there. My general assumption is that if they were anywhere real, there would be a lot of interest.

But, although I have doubts, I couldn’t say for sure if salt-water had that much energy to draw out.


10 posted on 07/19/2014 9:16:11 PM PDT by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults)
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To: Jonty30
Is there really enough energy contained in salt-water, even laboratory created salt-water to give these claimed performances.

Only if you had an awful lot of it, and dropped it from a great height.

11 posted on 07/19/2014 9:20:12 PM PDT by ROCKLOBSTER (Celebrate "Republicans Freed the Slaves" Month.)
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To: Jonty30

if the tech is viable... forget cars.

take that energy and use it to power homes directly.


12 posted on 07/19/2014 9:21:20 PM PDT by sten (fighting tyranny never goes out of style)
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To: Jonty30

http://www.nanoflowcell.com/en


13 posted on 07/19/2014 9:23:17 PM PDT by smokingfrog ( sleep with one eye open (<o> ---)
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To: Jonty30

I’m not sure either. The only application I’m aware of is for ocean survival gear with lights & radio beacons that automatically power up when immersed in salt water. They rely on a continuous flow of water to function, so the efficiency would have to improve by several orders of magnitude to be practical for high-power applications.


14 posted on 07/19/2014 9:25:55 PM PDT by Squawk 8888 (Will steal your comments & post on Twitter)
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To: smokingfrog

Websites that run a long video before letting you through to the content are SOP for scammers.


15 posted on 07/19/2014 9:28:21 PM PDT by Squawk 8888 (Will steal your comments & post on Twitter)
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To: Jonty30

Clearly just another battery car.


16 posted on 07/19/2014 9:32:12 PM PDT by bolobaby
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To: Jonty30

Very expensive and very complicated would be my guess.


Powered by what the company called ‘nanoFLOWCELL’ technology. In essence, flow-cells combine characteristics of a traditional battery, and fuel cells. Electrolyte fluid is circulated around two cells mounted side-by-side. Between these cells is a membrane that allows electrons to pass through. The electrical current generated from this flow of electrons can be used to power a vehicle—and that’s exactly how the e-Sportlimousine works.

Quant says the car has a torque output of “four times” 2,900 newton-meters (2,138 lb-ft), and the car’s acceleration figures certainly suggest there’s plenty of power. 62 mph is swept away in 2.8 seconds, and the car will press on to “over” 217 mph. The company claims several advantages of its flow-cell technology, but among them is energy density. A flow-cell of equivalent weight to a lithium-ion battery has five times greater performance.

http://www.foxnews.com/leisure/2014/07/18/nanoflowcell-powered-quant-e-limo-approved-for-german-road-trials/?intcmp=obnetwork


17 posted on 07/19/2014 9:37:16 PM PDT by smokingfrog ( sleep with one eye open (<o> ---)
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To: bolobaby

Battery powered cars are not the problem here. The source of energy is not the energy that is stored in the battery, but the salt-water composition, which would be a denser source of energy.

It’s just a question as to whether salt-water has the potential to store the amount of energy that the car claims to perform at. I don’t think it does, but my knowledge of chemistry is insufficient to say for sure.


18 posted on 07/19/2014 9:38:47 PM PDT by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults)
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To: sten

If you’ve that many Ah stored in that battery to get a car to go that fast, then yes, it should be repurposed for home power use. You could eliminate brown outs by equalizing the draw across 24 hours and never notice power losses due to bad weather.

With the Volt 10kwh can get you about 35 to 40 miles at up to 100 miles per hour. For a house, that’s a third to a quarter of the juice needed to power a small home. He’s bragging he can go faster and farther so he must have a battery that could output more.


19 posted on 07/19/2014 9:47:53 PM PDT by Bogey78O (We had a good run. Coulda been great still.)
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To: Jonty30

I would be more impressed if it could go 300+ miles on one charge.


20 posted on 07/19/2014 9:52:55 PM PDT by Lurkina.n.Learnin
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To: Jonty30

Out of Breaking News and into Chat where it belongs. Shudda done that in the first place.


21 posted on 07/19/2014 9:56:45 PM PDT by upchuck (The country is being billed for its own execution. ~ h/t: SpaceBar)
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To: Lurkina.n.Learnin

It says that it can go almost 400 miles on one fill-up.


22 posted on 07/19/2014 10:15:17 PM PDT by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults)
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To: Jonty30

“a range of more than 600 km (373 mi).”

Sorry, I missed that part. Guess I need to pay closer attention.


23 posted on 07/19/2014 10:21:00 PM PDT by Lurkina.n.Learnin
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To: Jonty30

The answer to the question in the headline is:

It doesn’t exist in reality


24 posted on 07/19/2014 10:22:21 PM PDT by GeronL (Vote for Conservatives not for Republicans)
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To: GeronL

It may not exist because it’s not quite ready for the consumer market.

But if Europe, according to the article is testing it.


25 posted on 07/19/2014 10:37:17 PM PDT by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults)
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To: Bogey78O
With the Volt 10kwh can get you about 35 to 40 miles at up to 100 miles per hour. For a house, that’s a third to a quarter of the juice needed to power a small home. He’s bragging he can go faster and farther so he must have a battery that could output more.

Probably a battery that weighs 12,000 lbs and has a 150 mile cable so the vehicle doesn't have to pull the weight...

26 posted on 07/20/2014 4:41:58 AM PDT by trebb (Where in the the hell has my country gone?)
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To: GeronL
It doesn’t exist in reality

But it does.....

After an in-depth inspection of the car, the German TÜV Süd in Munich handed over the official registration plate this week. Now the company will be able to test the car on public roads in Germany and Europe as it prepares it for series production.

27 posted on 07/20/2014 4:56:09 AM PDT by Hot Tabasco (By now, everyone should know that you shoot a zombie in the head. Don't try to reason with them...)
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To: Jonty30
"What would be the real world problems with this car?"

Not much, just the laws of Physics and Thermodynamics.

28 posted on 07/20/2014 5:10:20 AM PDT by norwaypinesavage (The Stone Age didn’t end because we ran out of stones)
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To: Jonty30

This is likely crap.

Look to graphene for true battery advances.


29 posted on 07/20/2014 6:06:05 AM PDT by bolobaby
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To: Jonty30

Can it tow my 40ft 5th wheel? When I see battery run 18 wheelers then I might be interested in a battery car.


30 posted on 07/20/2014 8:29:38 AM PDT by bikerman (Because of the lack of ammo there will be no warning shots.)
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