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Ancient graffiti proves Spain's Irish links
The Local ^ | July 22, 2014 | Alex Dunham

Posted on 07/26/2014 1:35:07 PM PDT by SunkenCiv

An ancient inscription discovered on a 14th century church in Spain's Galicia region has been identified as Gaelic; the first written evidence of the northern region’s Irish and Scottish heritage.

For centuries it has gone unnoticed, weathered by Galicia’s incessant drizzle but still visible to those with an eagle-eye.

On one of the granite walls of Santiago church in the small town of Betanzos, a small previously unintelligible inscription five metres above ground kept historians and epigraphists, or people who study ancient inscriptions, baffled for decades.

Researchers working for a private association called the Gaelaico Project now believe they've finally deciphered what it reads: "An Ghaltacht" or "Gaelic-speaking area".

"If our interpretation is right, the inscription isn't related to religious matters, but rather to the language that was spoken in Galicia at the time," Proxecto Gaelaico head Martín Fernández Maceiras told local daily La Voz de Galicia.

"It seems logical that the inscription was made while the church was being built (in the 14th century)."

Up to now, Galicia, along with Asturias and northern Portugal, have been informally considered part of the ancient Celtic nations (Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Brittany, Isle of Man and Cornwall) due to cultural and historical reasons rather than because of written proof.

Although researchers are hoping to get a second opinion from expert epigraphists on whether the inscription does indeed read “Gaelic-speaking area”, the chances of it being the first written evidence of Galicia’s Celtic past are high.

Despite the dominance of Latin, there are plenty of Gaelic traits still present in Galicia,” James Duran, academic expert on minority languages at the US's Stanford University, told La Voz de Galicia.

(Excerpt) Read more at thelocal.es ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: celtiberians; celts; epigraphyandlanguage; gaelic; galicia; godsgravesglyphs; ireland; spain
The ruins of numerous ancient Celtic settlements known as castros are still present in Galicia today. Photo: Castro de Baroña by Feans/Flickr

The ruins of numerous ancient Celtic settlements known as castros are still present in Galicia today. Photo: Castro de Baroña by Feans/Flickr

1 posted on 07/26/2014 1:35:07 PM PDT by SunkenCiv
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To: 240B; 75thOVI; Adder; albertp; asgardshill; At the Window; bitt; blu; BradyLS; cajungirl; ...
Barry Fell ping! Weekly digest greetings!

2 posted on 07/26/2014 1:36:46 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv

“Castro” was actually a Latin word referring to a large military encampment. The Romans, who were all throughout Northern (and Southern) Spain, used it to refer to the fortified towns of the Celts.


3 posted on 07/26/2014 1:38:14 PM PDT by livius
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To: SunkenCiv

Interesting article.


4 posted on 07/26/2014 1:39:07 PM PDT by Beowulf9
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To: SunkenCiv
From the comments:

According to Chinese Communist Party law, this is evidence that Galicia, Asturias, and northern Portugal belong to Ireland. Ireland should begin mobilization immediately.

5 posted on 07/26/2014 1:43:34 PM PDT by Zhang Fei (Let us pray that peace be now restored to the world and that God will preserve it always.)
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To: SunkenCiv
Graffiti says R1b wuz here.
6 posted on 07/26/2014 1:45:20 PM PDT by Theoria (I should never have surrendered. I should have fought until I was the last man alive)
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To: SunkenCiv

I drew my initials in the wet cement that the city poured fixing our sidewalk. My fame will live forever...


7 posted on 07/26/2014 1:48:04 PM PDT by Drango (A liberal's compassion is limited only by the size of someone else's wallet.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Spanish Armada


8 posted on 07/26/2014 1:48:06 PM PDT by bunkerhill7 ("The Second Amendment has no limits n firepower"-NY State Senator Kathleen A. Marchione.")
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To: Zhang Fei; All

Mobilize the Guinness! ...the Irish Ale.


9 posted on 07/26/2014 1:48:36 PM PDT by skinkinthegrass (The end move in politics is always to pick up a weapon...0'Bathhouse/"Rustler" Reid? d8-)
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To: Zhang Fei

Send in Regiments of leprechauns.


10 posted on 07/26/2014 1:48:54 PM PDT by shove_it (Directive 10-289 lives)
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To: Zhang Fei

Researchers working for a private association called the Gaelaico Project now believe they’ve finally deciphered what it reads: “An Ghaltacht” or “Gun-Free Zone”.


11 posted on 07/26/2014 1:51:35 PM PDT by bunkerhill7 ("The Second Amendment has no limits n firepower"-NY State Senator Kathleen A. Marchione.")
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To: SunkenCiv

I thought this was well established fact.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milesians_%28Irish%29


12 posted on 07/26/2014 1:52:11 PM PDT by wolfpat (Not to know what has been transacted in former times is to be always a child. -- Cicero)
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To: wolfpat

Researchers working for a private association called the Gaelaico Project now believe they’ve finally deciphered what it reads: “An Ghaltacht” or “Press 1 for Gaelic, 2 for Spanish, 3 for English”.


13 posted on 07/26/2014 1:53:40 PM PDT by bunkerhill7 ("The Second Amendment has no limits n firepower"-NY State Senator Kathleen A. Marchione.")
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To: wolfpat
That is what I was taught.

The Gaelic people came from areas of France, Spain and Portugal and either fled to Ireland from fear (or defeat) of invaders, or as the result of exploration (likely a combination of both).

14 posted on 07/26/2014 2:25:58 PM PDT by Michael.SF. (It takes a gun to feed a village)
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To: SunkenCiv
So it was Gaelic before the 1300s, as were France, England, etc., and in the 1300s, there was some Catholic influence. It's an interesting article, but that's not surprising news to me.

"...the first written evidence of the northern region’s Irish and Scottish heritage."

Alright. That's interesting in light of the invention of English in the 600s, about 700 years earlier. Maybe Roman influences kept the Irish fulfilling their duty to party much for all of those years.


15 posted on 07/26/2014 2:36:21 PM PDT by familyop ("Dry land is not just our destination, it is our destiny!" - -Deacon character, "Waterworld")
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To: SunkenCiv

One really doesn’t think of the 14th century as “ancient.” It’s just “old.”


16 posted on 07/26/2014 2:39:00 PM PDT by Tax-chick (No power in the 'verse can stop me.)
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To: SunkenCiv

The Gaelic speaking folks much earlier migrated from Anatolia (north and northeast of Assyria) to the areas that became Scotland, Ireland, England, Wales, France and maybe more to the north (but not to the south, see Roman writings about, in their perceptions, the evil, elusive, barbaric Gauls). The Spaniards earlier on...? Carthage, Romans.


17 posted on 07/26/2014 2:42:57 PM PDT by familyop ("Dry land is not just our destination, it is our destiny!" - -Deacon character, "Waterworld")
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To: SunkenCiv

I’ve always thought that the Moorish conquest of Iberia, then the reconquest of same to drive out the Moors did much to establish the current dominance of the language common to modern Spain.


18 posted on 07/26/2014 2:52:54 PM PDT by Grimmy (equivocation is but the first step along the road to capitulation)
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To: SunkenCiv
"Up to now, Galicia, along with Asturias and northern Portugal, have been informally considered part of the ancient Celtic nations (Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Brittany, Isle of Man and Cornwall) due to cultural and historical reasons rather than because of written proof."

Ah, I see. Asturias: part of Spain. So, will the extrapolations and speculations get southern whites whiter, and colors, brighter?


19 posted on 07/26/2014 2:55:23 PM PDT by familyop ("Dry land is not just our destination, it is our destiny!" - -Deacon character, "Waterworld")
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To: SunkenCiv

Shamus was here


20 posted on 07/26/2014 3:14:03 PM PDT by minnesota_bound
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To: SunkenCiv

The Santiago church (Saint James church) must now be called Eaglais Naomh Seamas, I reckon. In memory of the Son of Thunder, Matamoros.


21 posted on 07/26/2014 3:29:55 PM PDT by Unknowing (Now is the time for all smart little girls to come to the aid of their country.)
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To: Unknowing
Eaglais

Gosh, that's almost like a cognate for the Spanish word for church!

22 posted on 07/26/2014 3:34:00 PM PDT by Tax-chick (No power in the 'verse can stop me.)
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To: SunkenCiv

I would have thought the great big clue to the area’s celtic/gaelic origins would have been in its very name.

Wales is “Pays de Galles” in French, the language of Scotland is Gallic, the Irish are Gaels, I’m no linguistic expert but there seems to be a bit of a link. Plus the fact that like Wales, Ireland, Cornwall, the Isle of Man, the Scottish highlands an islands, Brittany etc. it’s another one of those rugged little enclaves of northwestern Europe where the Celts all seemed to end up.

You know for such a tough bunch of guys the Celts sure let themselves be pushed out into the fringes by whoever happened to show up later in their homelands.


23 posted on 07/26/2014 4:17:39 PM PDT by PotatoHeadMick
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To: shove_it
Send in Regiments of leprechauns.

Who needs leprechauns when you've got the IRA?

24 posted on 07/26/2014 4:27:20 PM PDT by Zhang Fei (Let us pray that peace be now restored to the world and that God will preserve it always.)
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To: Theoria
"Graffiti says R1b wuz here. "

Exactly and 'H' too.

25 posted on 07/26/2014 5:26:32 PM PDT by blam (Jeff Sessions For President)
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To: PotatoHeadMick
You know for such a tough bunch of guys the Celts sure let themselves be pushed out into the fringes by whoever happened to show up later in their homelands.

When the briefly-toughest guys settle into the comfortable bottomlands, they grow soft in just a few generations. Meanwhile, the mountaineers get more and more counterproductively tough, until you can't do anything but kill them. (Afghans, for example.)

The Persians recognized this pattern in the early Classical age, 5th century B.C. or so. Once your warrior class moves out of the high steppes and gets comfortable, it's all over.

26 posted on 07/26/2014 6:27:42 PM PDT by Tax-chick (No power in the 'verse can stop me.)
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To: PotatoHeadMick

The closest part of France to America was Armorica. No doubt an academic would just consider that coincidental.


27 posted on 07/26/2014 9:34:09 PM PDT by Rockpile
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To: SunkenCiv

“Gaelic-speaking area” MEGA FACEPALM! If the area speaks Gaelic, they would not need a sign like that to tell people what language they’re speaking!

Try “Gaelic spoken here”, as in having Irish priests and/or monks, who could interpret for visitors or translate documents for business purposes.

Kind of like signs in Los Angeles banks and businesses, “English spoken here.” *<];-’)


28 posted on 07/26/2014 11:35:24 PM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
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