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Happy Birthday, ‘Lord Of The Rings’
cognoscenti.wbur.org ^

Posted on 07/29/2014 3:38:10 AM PDT by Perdogg

Sixty years ago today, “The Fellowship of the Ring,” part one of J.R.R. Tolkien’s masterwork, “The Lord of the Rings,” was published in the United Kingdom.

Tolkien conceived of the novel as one book, not three. He would have preferred for its approximately 1,200 to 1,500 pages (depending on the edition) to appear between just one set of covers. But his publisher, George Allen & Unwin, decided to mete out the fantasy narrative and release it as a trilogy over 15 months. “The Two Towers” came out in November, 1954, and “The Return of the King” hit bookstore shelves the following October.

The trilogy decision was prescient and would become the forebear of the generation-spanning “Star Wars” sequels, the blockbuster “Harry Potter” series and the “Game of Thrones” franchise that is thriving today in bookstores (and on cable). Among Tolkien’s gifts, arguably (and what his publisher was, no doubt, betting on), was his ability to create a richly-imagined world in which a reader might want to linger for months on end, until the next in the series was issued, and then go back again and again.

With Tolkien, there’s always a fuzzy corner of the map, a village or forest or sea, or a character or sub-plot we want to know more about, but can’t, because Tolkien didn’t write it.

What accounts for Middle-earth’s appeal? And why do so many readers want to make a return visit?

Though detailed most extensively in “The Lord of the Rings,” Tolkien’s fantastical Middle-earth is the thru-line in several of his works, from “The Hobbit,” published in 1937, and “The Adventures of Tom Bombadil,” which came out in 1962, to the posthumously-published “The Silmarillion,” which appeared in 1977. Each story, poem, appendix and unfinished tale adds further layers and echoes to Middle-earth. Like concentric circles, each of Tolkien’s books overlaps to create his “legendarium.”

That legendarium seems real. Its rules and history, even its geography and weather, are plausible. The appendices to “The Return of the King” list family trees, “Annals of the Kings and Rulers,” and glossaries for Elvish and Dwarvish, Tolkien’s invented languages. In some places, bloodlines, legends and myths that Tolkien spread over thousands of years get full descriptive treatment; in others, they’re merely hinted at. This means that for every tale fully told, there are a dozen other tales that are suggested. With Tolkien, there’s always a fuzzy corner of the map, a village or forest or sea, or a character or sub-plot we want to know more about, but can’t, because Tolkien didn’t write it.

That gap between what Tolkien made explicit and what he merely hinted at is his genius. As we yearn for more, we fill in the unknowns ourselves, charging our imaginations with the task of taking us there.

In a bare-bones timeline at the back of “Lord of the Rings,” Tolkien hints at further adventures of the major characters. He is clever, even mischievous, about drawing us in with ambiguity. Phrases such as, “it is said” or, “there is no record of,” keep readers guessing. Legolas and Gimli may have sailed off across the seas. Or they may not have. We don’t know, and that’s part of what draws us closer to his flickering storytelling fire.

We can’t travel to [Tolkien's] magical realms, embark on epic quests, feel the weight of ancient rivalries or wage good wars. But he makes us want to.

As fantasy, “Lord of the Rings” manages the neat trick of ringing true. 

Middle-earth maybe be filled with dwarves, hobbits, elves and orcs, but they seem human. Like the protagonists of any work of fiction, they have desires and motivations and complexities. They get entangled in complicated plots. The novel’s themes of good and evil, fellowship and corruption, sacrifice and treachery, are universal.

And in spite of his efforts to make the fantasy relatable, Tolkien also understood that it’s the un-real that grabs our attention. “This can’t happen to you,” the author seems to suggest, “but I want to you to dream that it might.” We can’t travel to his magical realms, embark on epic quests, feel the weight of ancient rivalries or wage good wars. But he makes us want to.

This push and pull, this drawing us in while keeping us at arm’s length, is what makes his Middle-earth all the more enticing.

As Bilbo Baggins once sang:

The Road goes ever on and on Down from the door where it began Now far ahead the Road has gone And I must follow, if I can.

May we keep following you, J.R.R. Tolkien.

And Happy Birthday, “Lord of the Rings.”


TOPICS: Books/Literature; Chit/Chat
KEYWORDS: tolkien
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1 posted on 07/29/2014 3:38:11 AM PDT by Perdogg
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To: DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis; fidelis; JDoutrider; Tax-chick; Altariel; Ann de IL; Aevery_Freeman; ..

ping


2 posted on 07/29/2014 3:39:14 AM PDT by Perdogg (I'm on a no Carb diet- NO Christie Ayotte Romney or Bush)
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To: Perdogg

It is unfortunate FR hosts such garbage as this.


3 posted on 07/29/2014 3:50:29 AM PDT by SpaceBar
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To: Perdogg

Happy Birthday indeed.


4 posted on 07/29/2014 3:52:08 AM PDT by Cap'n Crunch
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To: SpaceBar
It is unfortunate FR hosts such garbage as this.

Agreed. Leave any time you like.

5 posted on 07/29/2014 3:58:27 AM PDT by agere_contra (Hamas has dug miles of tunnels - but no bomb-shelters.)
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To: Perdogg

This author makes some excellent points about the appeal of Tolkien’s oeuvre, but he should have mentioned the glorious compound-complex sentences.


6 posted on 07/29/2014 4:07:02 AM PDT by Tax-chick (No power in the 'verse can stop me.)
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To: SpaceBar
It is unfortunate FR hosts such garbage as this.

In before the Orcs... Oops. I guess not.

7 posted on 07/29/2014 4:14:37 AM PDT by Flick Lives ("I can't believe it's not Fascism!")
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To: Perdogg

Actually, the remarkable thing that separates Tolkien from the great majority of science fiction and fantasy literature is that “Tolkien did write it.”

Most fantasy books and movies simply toss in throwaway lines like “Ah, that is no ordinary sword, that is the great Sword of Polywoggle!” when it becomes a convenient plot device for the hero to find a powerful sword.

Tolkien did not put anything into LOTR that he did not think through and write out for himself the private backstory. He carefully constructed thousands of years of history for the characters and their ancestors, of which often only a few brief lines make it into the text. He constructed the grammar and vocabulary for entire languages (language was his profession and a lifelong love of his), and characters speak different dialects of those languages.

The reason that his literary world seems to have remarkable depth is that the depth really existed, even if the reader did not see it all. Thus, we can be moved to tears by Elrond’s separation from his daughter Arwen through her marriage to the hero Aragorn, even though we know only a little bit of his tragic family history. Or the temptation of the wise Galadriel to seize Ring for her own, and the rejection of that temptation seems real, even though we have only the smallest glimpse of her as a fiery leader of the Elven exiles in her youth.

Much of the backstory was only published after Tolkien’s death, through the efforts of his son Christopher to organize and publish his father’s writings. In his letters, Tolkien made clear that he considered it cheating to refer to events or character’s when he didn’t have a clear idea of their story. In one letter to a reader he admits with regret that the one time he had cheated like this was in a reference to ‘Queen Berthea’s cats’, but then he goes on to provide that story.

Tolkien was a conservative politically and a devout Catholic. His writings are remarkably relevant today, because even when the forces of darkness seem overwhelming, and our leaders seem to betray us (Saruman), to be mired in dispair (Denethor), to be taken away to soon (Gandalf), or to be ignored (Aragorn), Tolkien holds out the hope that inner strength can be revived and tapped (Theoden), and that the ultimate hope for our world lies not in our leaders but in the quiet courageous actions of simple folk.


8 posted on 07/29/2014 5:04:10 AM PDT by CaptainMorgantown
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To: Perdogg
As fantasy, “Lord of the Rings” manages the neat trick of ringing true. 

I've read these books >15 times
The threads of Wonder, Kindness, Honor, Bravery
also Hatred, Fear, Pride, Covetousness

Woven into an alternate Universe that is deeply conceived
and Powerfully Wrought

Teaches lessons about the Human Condition
not easily expressed in Classic Fiction

9 posted on 07/29/2014 5:07:56 AM PDT by HangnJudge
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To: Perdogg

One of the greatest “True Myth” writers of all time. We love and miss you J.R.R.


10 posted on 07/29/2014 5:09:17 AM PDT by ThomasMore (Islam is the Whore of Babylon!)
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To: CaptainMorgantown

Wow I never knew he spent so much time creating back stories for his characters.

I’m sorry it’s not clear to me from what you posted here: are these back stories published?


11 posted on 07/29/2014 5:17:51 AM PDT by FourtySeven (47)
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To: Perdogg

LOTR seems like Ancient Literature, as it has the cadence and aura of time -honored myth and legend.

And yet, it is two years YOUNGER than me!

That makes me feel OLD! LOL!


12 posted on 07/29/2014 5:26:01 AM PDT by left that other site (You shall know the Truth, and The Truth Shall Set You Free.)
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To: FourtySeven

If you want the “backstory” to all of Tolkien’s legendarium, read the Silmarillion. It is tedious beyond belief but it catalogs all the threads, tales, relationships, and legacies from the Trilogy, along with dozens you’ve never heard of.


13 posted on 07/29/2014 5:27:39 AM PDT by IronJack
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To: IronJack

And when you’re done with that, read all of the stuff that Christopher Tolkien has compiled that shows the earlier drafts and see how the concept of the world and the history evolved over about 50 years of his father’s writing.


14 posted on 07/29/2014 5:30:22 AM PDT by kevkrom (I'm not an unreasonable man... well, actually, I am. But hear me out anyway.)
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To: CaptainMorgantown

all good points and reasons I love Tolkien’s work so much.


15 posted on 07/29/2014 5:37:50 AM PDT by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis
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To: IronJack; Forty_Seven
It is tedious beyond belief ...

Oh, not that bad. Some parts are as dull as the slow sections of the Old Testament, but even in those passages, there will be a well-turned phrase or a sharp bit of irony to keep you going until the fighting starts again.

The language is intentionally grandiose and mythic, but you get used to it, just as you get used to Dumas or Tolstoy after a hundred pages or so.

16 posted on 07/29/2014 5:38:09 AM PDT by Tax-chick (No power in the 'verse can stop me.)
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To: left that other site

lol


17 posted on 07/29/2014 5:38:29 AM PDT by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis
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To: HangnJudge

I have to admit, Tolkien has spoiled me when it comes to good literature and especially fantasy. Nothing else really compares.


18 posted on 07/29/2014 5:39:45 AM PDT by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis
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To: Perdogg

Gene Wolfe wrote an awesome Tolkien essay a while ago. I guess he wrote Tolkien in the mid 60s and Tolkien wrote back, pretty cool stuff.

http://www.thenightland.co.uk/MYWEB/wolfemountains.html

Freegards


19 posted on 07/29/2014 5:44:08 AM PDT by Ransomed
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To: Tax-chick

Or Stephen king.


20 posted on 07/29/2014 5:44:29 AM PDT by longfellow (Bill Maher, the 21st hijacker.)
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To: Tax-chick

Or Melville! LOL!

(JFTR, I have just finished reading “Moby Dick” for the fifth time.)


21 posted on 07/29/2014 5:47:52 AM PDT by left that other site (You shall know the Truth, and The Truth Shall Set You Free.)
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To: IronJack

Oh wow, thanks.


22 posted on 07/29/2014 5:50:30 AM PDT by FourtySeven (47)
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To: DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis

With LOTR, Tolstoy, and Moby Dick, the RHYTHM of the writing is as important as the story.

I just finished reading MD again, and experienced once more the rolling unresolved cadence of that ceaseless main, rocking , like a cradle teeming with life, through my feverish, restless heart. And that was just through the boring parts! LOL!


23 posted on 07/29/2014 5:53:07 AM PDT by left that other site (You shall know the Truth, and The Truth Shall Set You Free.)
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To: left that other site

Old? No, it makes you “classic” and a “collectible”...lol!


24 posted on 07/29/2014 5:57:32 AM PDT by Caipirabob (Communists... Socialists... Democrats...Traitors... Who can tell the difference?)
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To: SpaceBar

Dang! Who peed in your cornflakes this morning?


25 posted on 07/29/2014 6:07:21 AM PDT by Alas Babylon!
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To: left that other site

The world needs more good books like those for sure.....so many novels today are lame, predictable, and poorly written.


26 posted on 07/29/2014 6:08:11 AM PDT by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis
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To: Flick Lives

lol


27 posted on 07/29/2014 6:09:31 AM PDT by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis
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To: SpaceBar
Hostile commentators sensed something they simply did not like in The Lord of the Rings (3 vols., 1954-5) and Tolkien’s other works: something that appealed to tradition, rightful authority and the high role of virtue as an element of lawful authority, as well as the goodness of earthy lives lived close to the soil, in close community and on ancestral holdings. It is a tale in which the corruptive nature of unlimited power is illustrated, in which ethical distinctions are made, and in which humble people take up arms to defend their land. To the liberal imagination, this is all reprehensible; and such writers as Edmund Wilson, John Le Carre, and Germaine Greer smelled the transcendent element in Tolkien’s works the way a dog smells death—and with the same response. Only they called it not the the transcendent, but craven escape and fascism—apparently believing that the taking down of weapons from the wall to defend one’s home and land is the first step on the road to becoming a goose-stepping worshipper of the total state.
28 posted on 07/29/2014 6:13:46 AM PDT by don-o (He will not share His glory and He will NOT be mocked! Blessed be the name of the Lord forever!)
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To: SpaceBar
It is unfortunate FR hosts such garbage as this.

I'll never understand the posters that think FR articles should be geared for their own personal likes and dislikes........

Did it ever occur to you to just pass the article on by if you don't want to read it?

29 posted on 07/29/2014 6:14:01 AM PDT by CAluvdubya (Molon Labe)
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To: Caipirabob

Ha Ha ha!


30 posted on 07/29/2014 6:15:53 AM PDT by left that other site (You shall know the Truth, and The Truth Shall Set You Free.)
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To: SpaceBar
It is unfortunate FR hosts such garbage as this.

Everyone here is free to pick and choose what we read, and what we ignore.

31 posted on 07/29/2014 6:16:57 AM PDT by The_Victor (If all I want is a warm feeling, I should just wet my pants.)
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To: DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis

I agree.


32 posted on 07/29/2014 6:38:29 AM PDT by left that other site (You shall know the Truth, and The Truth Shall Set You Free.)
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To: FourtySeven

There’s quite a bit actually and The Silmarillion is a good place to start but like other’s have said, its not in the “novel” style of LOTR.

Even denser are the dozen or so volumes of “The History Of The Peoples Of Middle Earth” compiled from JRR’s notes over 50 years by his son Christopher. It’s like poring through 100,000 pages of heavily annotated academic text, but great for the true fanatic.

There’s also “Lost Tales” and “Forgotten Tales”, also compiled by Christopher, more like The Silmarillion in style. “The Children of Hurin” is a fuller version of some of the stories in the Silmarillion about men.

There’s a ton of stuff on the web too, it’s been a huge subject since the early days of the Internet. The flame war over “Do Balrogs have wings?” in the usenet newsgroups is still talked about.

Try http://tolkien.slimy.com/ , the Tolkien meta faq for some interesting stuff.


33 posted on 07/29/2014 7:06:26 AM PDT by papineau (Who doesn't jump is a French!!)
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To: IronJack

He created his own languages for the stories as well. Trekkies are still jealous with their attempt making Klingon a language.


34 posted on 07/29/2014 8:03:54 AM PDT by Resolute Conservative
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To: papineau

Cool thanks.

So what’s the consensus now? Do Balrogs have wings?


35 posted on 07/29/2014 8:06:42 AM PDT by FourtySeven (47)
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To: FourtySeven

most definitively


36 posted on 07/29/2014 8:11:28 AM PDT by Hegewisch Dupa
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To: SpaceBar

clown. Grow the hell up


37 posted on 07/29/2014 8:12:59 AM PDT by Hegewisch Dupa
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To: FourtySeven

Nope, no wings.


38 posted on 07/29/2014 8:16:00 AM PDT by papineau (Who doesn't jump is a French!!)
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To: papineau

i think there is a line that mentions it spreading its wings as it approaches that “you shall not pass” guy


39 posted on 07/29/2014 8:20:51 AM PDT by Hegewisch Dupa
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To: papineau
Found the line:

"drew itself to a great height, and its wings spread from wall to wall"

40 posted on 07/29/2014 8:28:14 AM PDT by Hegewisch Dupa
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To: Perdogg

Just great writing.


41 posted on 07/29/2014 8:52:11 AM PDT by Sam Gamgee (May God have mercy upon my enemies, because I won't. - Patton)
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To: CaptainMorgantown

And he ridicules those on the good side that won’t pick up a sword to defend their freedom, or those out of despair, want to surrender.


42 posted on 07/29/2014 8:54:18 AM PDT by Sam Gamgee (May God have mercy upon my enemies, because I won't. - Patton)
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To: Hegewisch Dupa

But before the line you mention it says:

“His enemy halted again, facing him, and the shadow about it
reached out LIKE two vast wings.”

Hence the great flame war! The main arguments for both sides can be seen at http://tolkien.slimy.com/ , under the “Creatures’ Characteristics” section. You can also follow the debates over the great issues of of our time such as, “Did Dwarf women have beards?”


43 posted on 07/29/2014 8:58:18 AM PDT by papineau (Who doesn't jump is a French!!)
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To: IronJack
If you want the “backstory” to all of Tolkien’s legendarium, read the Silmarillion. It is tedious beyond belief but it catalogs all the threads, tales, relationships, and legacies from the Trilogy, along with dozens you’ve never heard of.

Indeed, The Silmarillion has all the back stories and more. Yet I would recommend listening to it in 13 parts on YouTube.

Download them and listen to them as an audiobook. I did and it came alive after I had stopped trying to actually read the book. Tedious beyond belief is an appropriate description.

But listening to it as audiobook is sooo much more enjoyable.

44 posted on 07/29/2014 9:08:30 AM PDT by Bloody Sam Roberts (My life has been a poor attempt to imitate the man. I am a living legacy to the leader of the band.)
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To: papineau

Ha! That’s awesome. Funny how my memory only retained what it wanted to. Wait; that’s my typical M.O. ....


45 posted on 07/29/2014 9:37:18 AM PDT by Hegewisch Dupa
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To: left that other site

Maybe I’ll get the CD of Moby-Dick. I’m almost through my current batch of library books.


46 posted on 07/29/2014 9:54:59 AM PDT by Tax-chick (No power in the 'verse can stop me.)
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To: Tax-chick

There are three versions. May I recommend the one with Gregory Peck as Ahab?

It is not as “True” to the book, but it is a better movie, IMNSHO.


47 posted on 07/29/2014 10:22:04 AM PDT by left that other site (You shall know the Truth, and The Truth Shall Set You Free.)
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To: FourtySeven

Wow I never knew he spent so much time creating back stories for his characters.

I’m sorry it’s not clear to me from what you posted here: are these back stories published?

A huge amount of his additional materials have been published, largely thanks to his son Christopher. The first of these is The Silmarillion, which was edited by Christopher Tolkien and published posthumously. Another collection of mostly new background material is called Unfinished Tales. There is also a collection of his letters (including a lot of correspondence with readers in which he answers the readers questions about the story and history) that has been published. And then, if you are really interested, there is a multivolume series (I think currently at about 13 volumes) called The History of Middle Earth. A lot of the material in this is carefully footnoted early drafts of Lord of the Rings and the Silmarillion, but there are bits of new material sprinkled throughout. The one with the most new material is one of the last volumes of this series called Morgoth's Ring.

48 posted on 07/29/2014 12:00:27 PM PDT by CaptainMorgantown
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To: left that other site

I meant the recorded book. However, I’ll keep your suggestion in mind if I decide to watch a movie after the book.


49 posted on 07/29/2014 12:53:58 PM PDT by Tax-chick (No power in the 'verse can stop me.)
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To: Tax-chick

Oh my...I would LOVE to hear the recorded book!

Wouldn’t it be nice if it were narrated by someone’s voice that we know and love...like Charlton Heston! :-)


50 posted on 07/29/2014 12:55:38 PM PDT by left that other site (You shall know the Truth, and The Truth Shall Set You Free.)
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