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8 Jobs That Can Make You Happy and Rich
Business Insider ^ | 07/29/2014 | Jacquelyn Smith and Skye Gould

Posted on 07/29/2014 7:46:14 AM PDT by SeekAndFind

Most people believe "a happy career" and "a fat paycheck" are mutually exclusive — but online jobs community CareerBliss.com recently found that these two things sometimes do go hand in hand.

CareerBliss compiled its new list of jobs that can make you happy and rich by analyzing more than 50,000 independent company reviews from 2013 and 2014.

The reviews are from employees all over the U.S. who evaluated 10 factors that affect work happiness — one's relationship with their boss and coworkers; workplace environment; job resources; compensation; growth opportunities; company culture; company reputation; daily tasks; and job control over the work performed on a daily basis — on a five-point scale.

CareerBliss combined those numbers to find an average rating of overall happiness for each respondent, and then sorted the results by job title and salary to determine which jobs pay well and make professionals the happiest.

(Excerpt) Read more at businessinsider.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Society
KEYWORDS: jobs

1 posted on 07/29/2014 7:46:14 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

All well and good if you want to be an employee...

You have to seek your own passive income if you want to REALLY do what you want and still support your life.


2 posted on 07/29/2014 7:47:26 AM PDT by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter admits whom he's working for)
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To: SeekAndFind

POTUS - Unlimited money to spend,free vacations, 2 hour workdays twice a week, hobnob with the rich and famous, and free golf. Priceless


3 posted on 07/29/2014 7:50:07 AM PDT by Organic Panic
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To: SeekAndFind
Job That Can Make You Happy and Rich
4 posted on 07/29/2014 7:51:13 AM PDT by KeyLargo
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To: MrB

Oracle Database Administrator? Lead QA Engineer? What a BS list.

PS - I never met a Software QA person who was taken seriously. That is not a good thing, just an observation.


5 posted on 07/29/2014 8:01:39 AM PDT by rbg81
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To: rbg81

I like a good QA department, but their thinking baffles me.

I’m trying to get this thing to work,
and you’re trying to break it?


6 posted on 07/29/2014 8:02:53 AM PDT by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter admits whom he's working for)
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To: MrB
The commonality that I see with three jobs I'm familiar with.... CTO, Sr. HW engineer and Lead QA Engineer .... is that they take 15-20 years to get there. Probably lots of job satisfaction once you've arrived, but it's a long, long haul.

Others, like "Executive Chef" and "Construction Manager" would need a good bit of time in the business to reach as well, I'd think.

Articles like this make me wonder if somewhere out there, some soon-to-be college grad will read this and say "Hmmm. Maybe I'll be a CTO when I graduate. Wonder who's hiring for that position?"

Reality is a harsh mistress. :-)

7 posted on 07/29/2014 8:08:23 AM PDT by wbill
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To: MrB
Our QA Dept. is always at odds with the developers. Thing is, they're both right. :-)

QA, along with their own testing, gets input from the customers (who aren't always reasonable...'what do you mean, this software WON'T wash my car and cure male pattern baldness? YOUR salesguy said it would!' .... and feeds it back to R&D.

R&D looks at the input. A third of the time they say "Uh.... yeah, this is software, not a 'car wash' And I dunno about this baldness thing." A third of the time they say "Yeah. That doesn't fit into the current roadmap." (translation: 'This is hard, and I don't feel like doing it.'). The final third of the time, the process works pretty well.

It's fun to watch, from a distance. I'd not want to be in either place, though. :-)

8 posted on 07/29/2014 8:16:40 AM PDT by wbill
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To: wbill

After 20 odd years in software I can say that I hate it and if not for money I would leave it. Too late in life to change and make the same money. Back in the 80’s and early 90’s it was fun. Frustration and layer upon layer of over complex crap written by people who read about it on a blog instead of following the KISS principle.


9 posted on 07/29/2014 8:19:58 AM PDT by Resolute Conservative
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To: MrB

“Breaking” the system is the job of Testing. That’s actually a good thing, because the customer will minimize the number of breaks the user can accomplish.

QA is different. QA independently looks over the paperwork and makes sure all the i’s are dotted and the t’s are crossed. They make sure that procedure is followed, all development phases are done completely, and [reckless] shortcuts are avoided. They spend a lot of time reviewing software development and test folders, but are not developers. This naturally causes a lot of friction with the actual developers, who tend to look down on the QA folks.

I suppose there are some companies who have consolidated Testing and QA, but I have yet to see that.

I would never take a QA job unless I absolutely had to. It thankless and the worst of all worlds.


10 posted on 07/29/2014 8:19:59 AM PDT by rbg81
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To: wbill

Compound all of the misery you mention when the customer is the U.S. Government.

Then compound it again when the the customer’s office is filled with your own cast-offs.


11 posted on 07/29/2014 8:20:24 AM PDT by HiJinx (People were created to be Loved; Things were created to be Used.)
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To: MrB

Oops...looks like I needed a QA guy for my response:

“Breaking” the system is the job of Testing. That’s actually a good thing, because it will minimize the number of breaks the user can accomplish.

QA is different. QA independently looks over the paperwork and makes sure all the i’s are dotted and the t’s are crossed. They make sure that procedure is followed, all development phases are done completely, and [reckless] shortcuts are avoided. They spend a lot of time reviewing software development and test folders, but are not developers. This naturally causes a lot of friction with the actual developers, who tend to look down on the QA folks.

I suppose there are some companies who have consolidated Testing and QA, but I have yet to see that.

Would never take a QA job unless I absolutely had to. It thankless and the worst of all worlds. From all appearances, it is actually high stress.


12 posted on 07/29/2014 8:23:40 AM PDT by rbg81
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To: SeekAndFind

Anyway to be happy and rich without the job and Uncle Sham’s involvement? (’


13 posted on 07/29/2014 8:29:25 AM PDT by tflabo (Truth or tyranny)
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To: SeekAndFind

Journeyman FAA Air Traffic Controllers at large facilities e.g. LAX tower, are pulling in at least $120K/yr.


14 posted on 07/29/2014 8:36:46 AM PDT by Signalman
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To: Signalman

RE: Journeyman FAA Air Traffic Controllers at large facilities e.g. LAX tower, are pulling in at least $120K/yr.

What about:

1) Working hours

2) Job Pressure


15 posted on 07/29/2014 8:37:51 AM PDT by SeekAndFind (If at first you don't succeed, put it out for beta test.)
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To: Resolute Conservative
After 20 odd years in software I can say that I hate it and if not for money I would leave it.

You and me both. 20-odd years ago I went into computers because I liked technology and loved computers.

Now I dislike them both. 'Tis a shame. I'm looking forward to retirement, so I can enjoy messing with electronics again.

Biggest difference that I've seen? When I got started, you needed to understand what you were doing. The 'Why' was always important. Now - especially since I'm teaching the next generation of engineers - 'Why' doesn't matter. They just Google a problem, and slap in the first solution that they find.

Which is fine when you're talking about someone's IPad. When you're talking about the company's multimillion dollar enterprise-level SAN, however, things need to be given consideration, and handled a little differently. I have the hardest time getting these kids to see the difference between "Jane Secretary's IPhone Candy Crush App" and "Data Storage that the entire business rests upon". Those who get it generally are OK....those who don't, don't last long.

16 posted on 07/29/2014 8:39:36 AM PDT by wbill
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To: SeekAndFind

They work a standard 40 hr week, rotating shifts. Great responsibility, obviously. They’ve got to keep those aircraft seperated.

I’m a retired FAA employee(not an ATC).


17 posted on 07/29/2014 8:44:29 AM PDT by Signalman
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To: wbill

“Hmmm. Maybe I’ll be a CTO when I graduate. Wonder who’s hiring for that position?”

These people have been told throughout their educational careers that they’re “special”, and “everyone gets a trophy”.

They are in for a harsh slap in the face when it comes down to “yeah, I said you’ll start by emptying the trash”.


18 posted on 07/29/2014 8:47:00 AM PDT by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter admits whom he's working for)
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To: wbill

Exactly. So many of the younger guys can write some really abstract object oriented, overly complicated stuff that they pull off of CodeProject which after 3 months they don’t understand either. It is like they just refuse to write a simple data access layer without having to slow it down with 2-3 layers of model forming objects to “make the data more workable”, I find it has just the opposite effect. I also don’t get wanting to use all these newer interpreted languages like Python and Ruby, yeah they may make you implement faster but do you know what it is doing. After all it is still a C++ compiler (or some other older language) underneath.

I also have a great dislike for the offshore coder trend. Indians especially are the worst. Book smart, but have no real world applicable ability. Asians and a couple outfits out of Israel on the other hand, those guys can design and code. I have not been impressed by an eastern European stuff either.

I cannot wait to get out of it.


19 posted on 07/29/2014 9:03:53 AM PDT by Resolute Conservative
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To: SeekAndFind

Every CTO I’ve encountered were obviously incompetent Project Managers or incompetent developers/engineers who couldn’t write a line of code or figure out an IP address but they had executive hair and looked good at being incompetent.

I’m sure most are happy and rich, they do mostly nothing positive, impose stifling rules on productivity, take the credit for what goes well and blame the implementors for failures. They generally bail out just before the operation falls apart and move on to the next “opportunity” to make more money through big talk but no workable actions.

The ones who are worth their salt are few and far between and generally have come up through the ranks by being good at what they do.


20 posted on 07/29/2014 9:06:30 AM PDT by RJS1950 (The democrats are the "enemies foreign and domestic" cited in the federal oath)
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To: MrB
I recently had a fun (for me, not so much for him) discussion with a soon-to-be college grad interning where I work. No idea how he got in, maybe he's someone's favorite nephew.

Guy was arrogant, and pretty well un-hireable, even with the interning experience that he received where I work. But, I did the right mangerial thing and listened, and offered what I thought was good advice.

He sat in my office complaining about how he couldn't find work - "and I've been looking for WEEKS!!". (LOL. Strike one.)

Then, he complained about people who were getting hired over him, but he has A COLLEGE DEGREE. (Strike two.)

Then, he wanted to know what *I* (yes, you heard that right) was going to DO about it. Strike three.....yer out.

My invaluable advice? Don't play up the degree, play up the interning experience. And, network. Join some user groups. Volunteer at a local school or church (he snickered at that one). "Experience, and contacts, are the two most valuable things in getting a job."

It's sad. He just dropped 100 grand plus on an education, been told by countless admins and profs how valuable he was, and how he'd walk out with a magic diploma and the world would beat a path to his door. Fat chance. He'd have been better off joining the Army, getting some of the p*ss and vinegar beaten out of him, and he might have actually learned something along the way.

21 posted on 07/29/2014 9:09:12 AM PDT by wbill
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To: wbill

I remember that guy, to a lesser degree... (me, 25 years ago)


22 posted on 07/29/2014 9:18:56 AM PDT by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter admits whom he's working for)
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To: Resolute Conservative
RE: Offshore coding...

I know a guy who's made a very, very good living at remediating code that's been done incompetently by offshore workers (usually Indians).

Approximately, Company 'A' sends coding projects offshore because it saves so much cash. In a few months, or years, they find that indeed, "You get what you pay for" and sack the offshore contractors.

Meanwhile, the company is now reliant on this critical bit of software that only works sporadically, if at all.

My friend then comes in, and for a fee that is roughly double what it would have been for him to code it all fresh to start with .... fixes the problems while whistling all the way to the bank.

I've worked for companies where communications were poor between management and the programmers that were sitting literally next to them. I've no idea why management would look at that, then say "Let's get coders from a completely different culture, move them to the other side of the globe, and put three layers of project managers between them and us. That'll fix it! What could go wrong?"

23 posted on 07/29/2014 9:19:26 AM PDT by wbill
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To: MrB

Oh, I dunno. If you’re smart enough (and humble enough) to recognize yourself as “That guy”.....then you’re probably not that guy. :-)


24 posted on 07/29/2014 9:21:22 AM PDT by wbill
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To: wbill

Not anymore!

2 Cor 5:17


25 posted on 07/29/2014 9:24:50 AM PDT by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter admits whom he's working for)
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To: SeekAndFind

I have a very different concept of “rich” than the author apparently.


26 posted on 07/29/2014 10:12:48 AM PDT by Durus (You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality. Ayn Rand)
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To: SeekAndFind

You’d be surprised. My son had both stress and bad hours at his job as a Police and Ambulance Dispatcher. But he loved the work and would go back to it in a heartbeat.


27 posted on 07/29/2014 5:33:39 PM PDT by HiJinx (People were created to be Loved; Things were created to be Used.)
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To: HiJinx

You speak about your son in the past tense... why did he leave the job in the first place?


28 posted on 07/29/2014 5:40:42 PM PDT by SeekAndFind (If at first you don't succeed, put it out for beta test.)
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To: SeekAndFind

Office politics. Bosses forced him out, so he moved on.


29 posted on 07/29/2014 9:51:42 PM PDT by HiJinx (People were created to be Loved; Things were created to be Used.)
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