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Are you losing your state university? Illinois has
American Thinker ^ | 08/01/2014 | By James Longstreet

Posted on 08/04/2014 7:10:06 AM PDT by SeekAndFind

The big business of education is forever altering the state university systems around the country. They have become vessels of profit and enrichment for some, and are steadily distancing themselves from the citizenry of the home state.

Hiding behind diversity and internationalism, universities have moved to out of state students and ultimately the international student. Left out are the in-state students looking for a reasonable cost of a college education from their own state university.

Why does college cost so much? Why does a professor who gave a lecture to a 200 seat hall ten years ago cost so much more to dispense the same knowledge today? Most of college-dispensed knowledge is static. Math, language, economics, literature, etc change little from decade to decade. Except for the sciences, essentially the base product remains the same.

So why does college cost so much? Part of the answer is that in-state slots are fewer and fewer, by design. Those who do not get the tuition break for in-state residence must go elsewhere at higher costs. The result being that a student who couldn’t get into his state university A now pays out of state tuition to state university B. The student who resides in-state B and couldn’t get into his university now becomes an out of state student at university A. The money game is easy to see. Both universities, A and B, get more money.

(Excerpt) Read more at americanthinker.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Education; Society
KEYWORDS: illinois; state; tuition; university

1 posted on 08/04/2014 7:10:06 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

From ROCK RIVER TIMES:

http://rockrivertimes.com/2013/09/13/university-of-illinois-has-17000-reasons-to-love-out-of-state-students/

Excerpt:

73 percent of the class of 2017 is from inside the state. The U of I long has had a goal to have three-quarters of its students come from Illinois high schools.

A decade ago, Illinois students made up 90 percent of the university’s classes.

The U of I’s admissions director, Stacey Kostell, told the Tribune that the lower in-state numbers were “not intentional.”

But as the school sees fewer local students, foreign-born and out-of-state students have flocked to the school.

Nearly 16 percent of the University of Illinois’ freshman class is from China.

“While it is good to have a good cross-section in our universities … we still need to be concerned about the average Illinoisan being able to afford the U of I,” state Rep. Mike Tryon, R-Crystal Lake, said.

It costs an Illinois student about $35,000 each year for tuition, room and board, fees and books at the U of I.

The university charges foreign students $52,000 for the same tuition, room and board, books and fees.

And that — the $17,000 difference — is incentive to accept more foreign students.


2 posted on 08/04/2014 7:12:09 AM PDT by SeekAndFind (If at first you don't succeed, put it out for beta test.)
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To: SeekAndFind

So why do these universities want to give in state rates to illegal aliens?


3 posted on 08/04/2014 7:13:21 AM PDT by Mamzelle
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To: SeekAndFind

Two words, “Foreign Students.”


4 posted on 08/04/2014 7:14:14 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: SeekAndFind
Nearly 16 percent of the University of Illinois’ freshman class is from China.
5 posted on 08/04/2014 7:16:17 AM PDT by kabar
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To: kabar

RE: Nearly 16 percent of the University of Illinois’ freshman class is from China.

Which makes me wonder, if China’s GDP per capita is on average MUCH LOWER than the USA, how did they manage to afford the tuition and board?


6 posted on 08/04/2014 7:17:46 AM PDT by SeekAndFind (If at first you don't succeed, put it out for beta test.)
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To: Mamzelle

They want to give in state rates to illegals to prove that they are liberal. And, to send a message that they treat illegals the same as their own state residents, to blur any distinctions between illegals and American citizens. Which is also something liberals want to do in other areas of life.


7 posted on 08/04/2014 7:18:27 AM PDT by Dilbert San Diego (s)
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To: SeekAndFind

Simple: try buying something NOT Made in China- - - .


8 posted on 08/04/2014 7:21:41 AM PDT by Graewoulf (Democrats' Obamacare Socialist Health Insur. Tax violates U.S. Constitution AND Anti-Trust Law.)
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To: dfwgator

It seems to me that all of us, in whatever state we live in, are supporting our state universities. These universities should be intended, in my opinion, for residents of our own states. Then, if there is room available after all state residents have been accepted, then accept out of state or foreign students.

Out of state or foreign students should not be getting preferences in any way in admissions. We taxpayers support these institutions of higher learning for our own state’s students.

Years ago, in-state students got preference. Nowadays, it appears that no longer applies.

But it should apply because we taxpayers pay for these universities. Taxpayers in other countries or other states do not pay their tax money to run these places.


9 posted on 08/04/2014 7:21:46 AM PDT by Dilbert San Diego (s)
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To: kabar

Yeah, pretty unbelievable

But gotta pay those worthless overhead left wing professors


10 posted on 08/04/2014 7:22:05 AM PDT by A_Former_Democrat (Get rid of "birthright citizenship" Out of room . . . no mas)
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To: SeekAndFind

In Maine, tution and fees only pay 39% of the costs. So what are they doing, they are chasing after international students, paying a company to recruit students to come to school in Maine. The company gets paid 80% of first years tution and 20% of the other 3 years if they stay.

You will probably find your state school is queitly doing the same.

The University system also paid $363,000 for a former president of one of its campuses to produce a report on how to get more international students to come to Maine schools. This was at the same time they had already engaged a compay to do just that. I don’t think anyone ever read the report.


11 posted on 08/04/2014 7:24:03 AM PDT by Steven Scharf
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To: SeekAndFind

Government subsidies and/or wealthy Chinese families.


12 posted on 08/04/2014 7:24:17 AM PDT by kabar
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To: Dilbert San Diego

Also, it used to be most students who did go to the State university stayed and worked in that state after graduation.

These days, I suspect that is not nearly the case....Therefore, what does the state really get back in return?


13 posted on 08/04/2014 7:27:05 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: A_Former_Democrat

If 27% of the students are in-state, then the Chinese must outnumber even out of state American students. These state universities are being subsidized by state taxpayers as well as by the federal government. Shouldn’t there be a much higher percentage of students from the state, by law?


14 posted on 08/04/2014 7:27:17 AM PDT by kabar
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To: kabar

When I was at U of Iowa, 30 percent of the students were from Illinois...


15 posted on 08/04/2014 7:27:41 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (Rip it out by the roots.)
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To: SeekAndFind

A couple of thoughts:

1. Yes, colleges love the out of state & international students because they often pay the full tuition price and get no financial aid. But the flip side is that, without these students, tuition prices for in-state students would be even higher.
2. Most universities these days are seeing a decrease in the student population. So, there likely ARE open slots at state universities, maybe just not in the top tier ones.
3. Except for the elite schools, the bottom third of the college/university students today should not be there. Many students in the middle third could make something out of college, but are not that motivated.
4. There are way too many administrators vs. faculty. At the school where I teach, they keep getting rid of faculty and adding administrators. Class sizes just keep getting bigger. I’ve lost track of the number of people with the title “Director”. It just boggles the mind.


16 posted on 08/04/2014 7:32:46 AM PDT by rbg81
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To: kabar

These state universities are being subsidized by state taxpayers as well as by the federal government.


For most state schools, subsidies, as a percentage of the operating budget, have been cut since the 1970s. These schools rely on out-of-staters to stay afloat.


17 posted on 08/04/2014 7:34:31 AM PDT by rbg81
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To: SeekAndFind

Which makes me wonder, if China’s GDP per capita is on average MUCH LOWER than the USA, how did they manage to afford the tuition and board?


Remember that China has a one child policy. Many Chinese parents will use their life savings & go into debt if they can get a quality college education in the US for their kids.


18 posted on 08/04/2014 7:36:57 AM PDT by rbg81
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To: Graewoulf

RE: Simple: try buying something NOT Made in China- - - .

I try to, but I have a budget...


19 posted on 08/04/2014 7:37:25 AM PDT by SeekAndFind (If at first you don't succeed, put it out for beta test.)
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To: dfwgator
Other than the favored illegal alien demographic, foreign students are favored because foreign students pay full or nearly full cash tuition. It is as much economics as it is politics.

Left out are the in-state students looking for a reasonable cost of a college education from their own state university.

Just like Washington, DC politicians no longer represent the interest of Americans, state universities (with the exception of a few solidly conservative states in the South, Midwest and Intermountain West) no longer represent the interests of their state residents.

The solution isn't to p*ss and moan or even, as some have suggested, try to reform the entrenched educrat bureaucracy. The solution is to start guiding your children, your friends and your grandchildren to private universities (or the few remaining public ones) which represent our values. These options are not only far more reasonable costwise (because their tuitions aren't subsidizing departments full of anti-American XYZ studies professors), but they deliver an equal or even better quality product.

A close relative of mine just started medical school at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia this month and was astounded to find that the quality of facilities, teaching, labs, etc. was even better than her first look-see at LU before she decided to apply.

News flash: You can spend your money on that kind of stuff when you aren't forced to subsidize termites. And your customers (students) can get a tuition break in the process. The advantages of taxpayer funding are vastly overrated.

Again, I'm excepting a few solidly conservative states in the South, Midwest and Intermountain West. Texas A&M, Clemson University, WVU, Wyoming and a few other state subsidized schools are well worth looking at. Just realize that they are the exception, not the rule for state subsidized schools.

20 posted on 08/04/2014 7:40:01 AM PDT by Vigilanteman (Obama: Fake black man. Fake Messiah. Fake American. How many fakes can you fit in one Zer0?)
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To: SeekAndFind

>>Most of college-dispensed knowledge is static. Math, language, economics, literature, etc change little from decade to decade. Except for the sciences, essentially the base product remains the same.

I would argue that even the true sciences change very little over time at the undergraduate, and even the masters, level.


21 posted on 08/04/2014 7:42:51 AM PDT by FreedomPoster (Islam delenda est)
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To: SeekAndFind

The average Chinese is not who is coming, so averages mean little.


22 posted on 08/04/2014 7:44:10 AM PDT by FreedomPoster (Islam delenda est)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

Was it the high school after high school then? I couldn’t resist the home economics story ala MST3K.


23 posted on 08/04/2014 7:57:08 AM PDT by wally_bert (There are no winners in a game of losers. I'm Tommy Joyce, welcome to the Oriental Lounge.q)
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To: rbg81
For most state schools, subsidies, as a percentage of the operating budget, have been cut since the 1970s. These schools rely on out-of-staters to stay afloat.

Why are the universities in such financial extremis? Could it have something to do with tenure, inflated salaries for professors with low hours of classroom instruction, and a federal govenment that makes huge student loans easy to obtain? We have outstanding student loans of over a trillion dollars. This keeps the bloated system going.

And the dirty little secret is that the domestic pool of students is stagnant or declining as the demographics of the country change. Blacks and Hispanics make up an increasing percentage of those under 18. In fact, by 2019 half of the children 18 and under will be minorities as defined by the USG. Except for Asians, they are not attending college in the same numbers as non-Hispanic whites. Many universities and colleges must look outside the country to survive. We have 800,000 foreign students in the US with 25% of them coming from China.

It's a tricky numbers game at University of Illinois. State funding for the public school has shrunk year after year as Illinois' own budget gets tighter and tighter. The state's largest school got an appropriation of $667.5 million this year (of which Illinois still owes $456 million), down from $804 million in 2002. The school's operating budget is $5.4 billion.

"About 44.7 percent of Illinois residents who were offered admission to this fall's freshman class decided to attend, down from 45.8 percent last year. It's the lowest percentage in at least 10 years — and possibly ever.

"The number who took us up on our acceptance decreased slightly," Wise told trustees at their board meeting Thursday at the Urbana-Champaign campus. "The No. 1 reason students don't come is because of money." Meanwhile, there were more international applicants than ever before, and a larger percentage of those admitted decided to attend — 27.7 percent, compared with 22.2 percent last year. The number of foreign undergraduates has more than quadrupled in the past decade and now totals 4,990 students. Nearly 80 percent of the U. of I.'s international enrollees come from China, India and South Korea, and more than half — about 2,600 — come from China alone.

In fact, the U. of I. has more international students overall than any other public university in the country, according to a survey by the Institute of International Education. Including graduate students, there are more than 9,400 international students at U. of I. this fall, university data show.

"The percentage of U. of I. freshmen who are from foreign countries is near the top among Big Ten schools, trailing only Purdue University, according to 2011 data from the U.S. Department of Education."

24 posted on 08/04/2014 8:13:51 AM PDT by kabar
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To: SeekAndFind; MinuteGal

“Which makes me wonder, if China’s GDP per capita is on average MUCH LOWER than the USA, how did they manage to afford the tuition and board?”

China sends over their cream of the crop students, often from the rich oligarchy families, or some are subsidized by the China State. Probably some are also serving the function of spies, particularly in the Sciences. Up at UIC (Univ. of IL at Chicago) the twin sister of UIUC (Univ. of IL Champaign/Urbana) there are huge amounts of Chinese students, as the UIC campus is only about a 15 minute drive from Chinatown. I might add UIC also has a large population of Muzzie/Pali students on campus.


25 posted on 08/04/2014 8:20:55 AM PDT by flaglady47 (The useful idiots always go first)
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To: SeekAndFind

Do what Michigan State University has done.

Put the Board of Regents on the ballot with the Governor and make them stand for election every four years.


26 posted on 08/04/2014 8:47:41 AM PDT by Buckeye McFrog
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To: Buckeye McFrog

RE: Do what Michigan State University has done.

How’s the tuition fee at MSU?


27 posted on 08/04/2014 8:50:23 AM PDT by SeekAndFind (If at first you don't succeed, put it out for beta test.)
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28 posted on 08/04/2014 8:51:11 AM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: wally_bert

Must be thinking of Iowa State...


29 posted on 08/04/2014 8:58:50 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (Rip it out by the roots.)
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To: rbg81

“Yes, colleges love the out of state & international students because they often pay the full tuition price and get no financial aid. But the flip side is that, without these students, tuition prices for in-state students would be even higher.”

What evidence is there that this is true? At the University of California, the ability to ATTRACT foreign students was proffered as the explanation for exponential tuition rate increases in the 1990s.

And when you give a slot to a foreigner, it doesn’t “increase slots for others because (the foreign students) pay more money” — it deprives a Californian of his slot at UCLA.

“Most universities these days are seeing a decrease in the student population. So, there likely ARE open slots at state universities, maybe just not in the top tier ones.”

Not true at the University of California. Enrollment continues to increase every year, and thousands of QUALIFIED California residents are turned away from the flagship campuses of UCLA, Berkeley, San Diego and Santa Barbara and steered toward the campuses increasingly reserved for Californians (Riverside and Santa Cruz) so the slots at UCLA can be reserved for top-dollar foreigners.

“Except for the elite schools, the bottom third of the college/university students today should not be there.”

Nonsense. The University of California has high standards of admission across the board. If you meet them between GPA and test scores, you are perfectly qualified to attend; and you should be admitted to the campus of your choice before a resident from another state or another country.

I’ve had it up to here with the “Foreign kids are smarter and study more, so they DESERVE to be admitted to American universities more than Americans.” No, they are study prisoners who’ve come out of a freakazoid study system that we should not import to our shores. We’ve managed to lead the world in science and technology for two hundred years without it, thanks.

What other country in the world penalizes its own kids for achieving less than what foreigners say we should be achieving to be admitted to OUR OWN schools?

The “for-profit” state university mentality has taken away California kids’ right to an education at the schools our parents and grandparents BUILT AND PAID FOR. BY CALIFORNIANS, FOR CALIFORNIANS.


30 posted on 08/04/2014 9:28:28 AM PDT by Blue Ink
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To: SeekAndFind

When I went to state u. thirty years ago, tuition was about a thousand dollars a year. The tenured associate professors were making $25000. There’s part of the difference.


31 posted on 08/04/2014 9:52:59 AM PDT by ottbmare (the OTTB mare, now a proud Marine Mom)
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To: ottbmare

RE: When I went to state u. thirty years ago, tuition was about a thousand dollars a year. The tenured associate professors were making $25000. There’s part of the difference.

According to this INFLATION CALCULATOR:

http://data.bls.gov/cgi-bin/cpicalc.pl?cost1=1000&year1=1984&year2=2014

$1,000 thirty years ago has the same buying power as $2,293 in 2014.

A salary of $25,000 thirty years ago would be $57,000 today.


32 posted on 08/04/2014 9:58:11 AM PDT by SeekAndFind (If at first you don't succeed, put it out for beta test.)
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To: SeekAndFind

I know some of those professors. They are now making not $57000 but $150000.


33 posted on 08/04/2014 12:26:11 PM PDT by ottbmare (the OTTB mare, now a proud Marine Mom)
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To: flaglady47

In 2003, the Illinois legislature passed a law that allows illegal aliens to attend state universities and pay in-state tuition. Only one state senator (Chris Lauzen) voted against the bill.


34 posted on 08/06/2014 5:52:12 AM PDT by PhilCollins
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