Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Roman road discovered during digging in German city Aachen
Wichita Eagle ^ | November 07, 2017 | AP

Posted on 11/09/2017 11:37:48 PM PST by SunkenCiv

Aachen city archaeologist Andreas Schaub told the dpa news agency Tuesday the road is about six meters (yards) wide and is thought to possibly date back to the second century. Schaub says the road could have connected the important settlement in Aachen to what is today the Dutch city of Maastricht.

(Excerpt) Read more at kansas.com ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: aachen; germany; godsgravesglyphs; romanempire
Aachen, Germany – The Ancient Capital of the Holy Roman Empire

1 posted on 11/09/2017 11:37:48 PM PST by SunkenCiv
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

2 posted on 11/09/2017 11:39:47 PM PST by SunkenCiv (www.tapatalk.com/groups/godsgravesglyphs/, forum.darwincentral.org, www.gopbriefingroom.com)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

Cool! Visiting Roman ruins in W. Germany was a favorite weekend drive to do when I was stationed there. That was one of the best things about having military topographical maps because they were well-marked on them.


3 posted on 11/09/2017 11:49:50 PM PST by T-Bird45 (It feels like the seventies, and it shouldn't.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: T-Bird45
There's quite a lot, too, and more found each year. For that matter, about ten years ago, a "rescue" dig in Copenhagen Denmark in a suspected old site turned up a Roman cemetery. Roman settlement, rule, trade, and influence was spread quite a bit farther east and north than has been the drumbeat for generations. There was no "Battle That Stopped Rome" -- when the Romans quit, they did so because of diminishing returns (IOW, there was nothing worth the cost of conquest, or, there were much richer pickings elsewhere all of a sudden).

4 posted on 11/10/2017 12:42:35 AM PST by SunkenCiv (www.tapatalk.com/groups/godsgravesglyphs/, forum.darwincentral.org, www.gopbriefingroom.com)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: T-Bird45

All I remember seeing there of Roman times is the city wall of Regensburg (Castra Regina).


5 posted on 11/10/2017 12:54:04 AM PST by ExGeeEye (For dark is the suede that mows like a harvest.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

“...when the Romans quit, they did so because of diminishing returns (IOW, there was nothing worth the cost of conquest, or, there were much richer pickings elsewhere all of a sudden).”

How about this for a limiting factor - they stopped when they didn’t find any more natural warm mineral springs where they could indulge in the Roman bath experience? This observation could apply to Germany and England. I suppose if they ever heard of Iceland’s warm springs, they would have launched boats and tried to run off the Vikings and their descendants.


6 posted on 11/10/2017 1:35:45 AM PST by T-Bird45 (It feels like the seventies, and it shouldn't.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
http://www.kansas.com/news/nation-world/article183210841.html

The road was discovered as workers dug to install security barriers to secure the city's annual Christmas market.

So the road's discovery is owed to Islamic terrorism.

7 posted on 11/10/2017 5:27:48 AM PST by InABunkerUnderSF
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: T-Bird45
Norwegian Vikings settled Iceland in the 860’s, long after the Roman legions had vanished from Britain and other northern reaches of the empire..
8 posted on 11/10/2017 5:32:27 AM PST by hinckley buzzard
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: T-Bird45

You don’t need warm springs to have warm water. The Romans certainly knew how to heat water.


9 posted on 11/10/2017 6:33:46 AM PST by Alter Kaker (Gravitation is a theory, not a fact. It should be approached with an open mind...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

Aachen was later Charlemagne’s capital and the ceremonial capital of the Holy Roman Empire for the better part of a millennium.


10 posted on 11/10/2017 6:35:08 AM PST by Alter Kaker (Gravitation is a theory, not a fact. It should be approached with an open mind...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ExGeeEye; SunkenCiv

“All I remember seeing there of Roman times is the city wall of Regensburg”

Me too. And York.( The Viking museum is excellent!) Love seeing history.

The best thing I got to see when it comes to history was spending an afternoon at the Brandenburg gate a few months after the wall came down. Families being reunited after decades. Even the soldiers were getting teary eyed. Great day.

Found this yesterday.

https://uk.news.yahoo.com/roman-temple-restored-deep-under-city-london-125536246.html


11 posted on 11/10/2017 4:55:42 PM PST by lizma2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: lizma2

Best Brandenburg Gate memory: my sister visited me for a week. I took leave and rented a car, and showed her a week’s worth of Germany (not enough). It being, as far as I knew, my one chance in a lifetime, after going properly around the BG going east, I flopped a U-ey in Pariser Platz and returned to the west *through* the gate.

I don’t know how it is now, but at the time, the road was marked for buses only. 1995.


12 posted on 11/10/2017 5:43:05 PM PST by ExGeeEye (For dark is the suede that mows like a harvest.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson