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The Battle of New Orleans, Dec, 1814 - 8 Jan, 1815
BattleofNewOrleans.org ^ | 2009 | Thomas Zimmerman

Posted on 01/06/2018 11:45:25 AM PST by NonValueAdded

[British General Edward] Pakenham delayed his main assault until Jan 8, when he had brought up nearly 10,000 men, and planned to attack with about 5,500, keeping the rest in reserve.

[snip]

The men on both sides knew an attack was planned on the 8th. Jackson, clearly felt that some sort of night attack was coming . Jackson, was awakened by a messenger who arrived from Morgan across the river, requesting more troops. Morgan and Patterson could see some activity by the British on the river and feared they were going to send a large force across the river to bypass Jackson and recross the river to take New Orleans .Jackson told the messenger to report back that he had no men to spare and that he was confident the main attack would be against his line. Jackson looked at his watch. It was 1:00 a.m. He then awoke his aides, telling them the enemy would be upon them in a few minutes . At 4:00 a.m. General Adair marched his marched his 1,000 Kentucky militia about 50 yards behind the American line as a reserve.

(Excerpt) Read more at battleofneworleans.org ...


TOPICS: History
KEYWORDS: 1812; battle; history; neworleans
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In 1814 we took a little trip, along with Colonel Jackson down the mighty Mississip. We took a little bacon and we took a little beans, and we caught the bloody British in a town in New Orleans

Victory Celebration

There was a grand victory celebrating in New Orleans on Jan 23. The center of the public square, in front of the Cathedral, where the equestrian statue of Jackson now stands, was erected a temporary triumphal arch, supported by six Corinthian columns, and festooned with flowers and evergreens. Beneath the arch stood two beautiful little girls, each upon a pedestal, and holding in her hand a civic crown of laurel. Near them stood two damsels, one personifying Liberty and the other Justice. From the arch to the church, arranged in two rows, stood beautiful girls, all dressed in white, and each covered with a blue gauze veil and bearing a silver star on her brow. These personified the several States and Territories of the Union. At the appointed time, General Jackson, accompanied by the officers of his staff, passed through the gate of the Grand Square fronting the river, amid the roar of artillery, and was conducted between lines of Plauché’s New Orleans battalion of Creoles (which extended from the gate to the church) to the raised floor of the arch. As he stepped upon it the two little girls leaned gently forward and placed the laurel crown upon his head. A Te Deum was held in St. Louis Cathedral.

1 posted on 01/06/2018 11:45:25 AM PST by NonValueAdded
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To: NonValueAdded; Bull Snipe; dp0622; Maine Mariner; Bigg Red; QualityMan; DoodleDawg; Don W; ...
The War of 1812 ping list.

USS Constitution v HMS Guerriere Battle of New Orleans ping

Please FreepMail me if you want to be added to or removed from this somewhat low volume ping list. Ping requests gladly accepted.

Also note that posts pertaining to The War of 1812 will carry the keyword 1812 (clickable) for your searching pleasure.

2 posted on 01/06/2018 11:46:39 AM PST by NonValueAdded (#DeplorableMe #BitterClinger #HillNO! #cishet #MyPresident #MAGA #Winning #covfefe)
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To: NonValueAdded

Wasn’t the battle fought two weeks after the war end d?


3 posted on 01/06/2018 11:53:03 AM PST by Rannug (When you're dead, you're dead. Until then fight with everything you have.)
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To: NonValueAdded

All I know about the war of 1812 is from Johnny Horton.


4 posted on 01/06/2018 11:54:14 AM PST by Lurkina.n.Learnin (Wisdom and education are different things. Don't confuse them.)
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To: Rannug

Yes, but news traveled much slower back then.


5 posted on 01/06/2018 11:58:01 AM PST by reed13k
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To: NonValueAdded
The Eighth of January (aka The Battle of New Orleans)--Jimmie Driftwood (1957)
6 posted on 01/06/2018 12:03:12 PM PST by Fiji Hill
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To: NonValueAdded

I lived in new Orleans in the early 60’s. Jackson Square, with the iconic statue of Andrew Jackson and the Saint Louis Cathedral was my favorite place!


7 posted on 01/06/2018 12:04:18 PM PST by rockrr (Everything is different now...)
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To: Lurkina.n.Learnin

I got the correct answer to a history quiz based on that song.

I missed the one about who the combatants were in the Spanish-American War.


8 posted on 01/06/2018 12:05:18 PM PST by Ken H (Best election ever!)
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To: Rannug

Yep. An absolutely cruel twist of fate...Hundreds of good soldiers killed, thousands maimed, fighting a war that had already ended.


9 posted on 01/06/2018 12:05:44 PM PST by Wyrd bi ful ard (Flag burners can go screw -- I'm mighty PROUD of that ragged old flag)
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To: All

Did anyone attend the 200th anniversary celebration (assuming there must have been one)? Your report would be most welcome here.


10 posted on 01/06/2018 12:12:51 PM PST by NonValueAdded (#DeplorableMe #BitterClinger #HillNO! #cishet #MyPresident #MAGA #Winning #covfefe)
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To: rockrr

I hope the statue is still standing and did not fall victim to that feeding frenzy.


11 posted on 01/06/2018 12:14:22 PM PST by NonValueAdded (#DeplorableMe #BitterClinger #HillNO! #cishet #MyPresident #MAGA #Winning #covfefe)
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To: NonValueAdded
Johnny Horton's 'Battle of New Orleans' done to Miami Vice
12 posted on 01/06/2018 12:15:33 PM PST by mairdie
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To: NonValueAdded

It were better did the author employ a proofreader.


13 posted on 01/06/2018 12:17:27 PM PST by ThanhPhero (kK)
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To: NonValueAdded
Kismet-ic post, as I received Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans for Christmas and started reading yesterday. Heckuva close call for America. Especially since many of the New England states indicated a preference for secession rather than fight. Washington D.C. sacked and burned. New Orleans in British hands would have prevented the opening of the west.
14 posted on 01/06/2018 12:30:06 PM PST by StAntKnee (Add your own danged sarc tag)
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To: Wyrd bið ful aræd; Rannug

Never mind the news could not make it in time - it was not RATIFIED by American Congress either until March or April. So even if they knew about BRITS signing it, it was not fully valid.


15 posted on 01/06/2018 12:34:53 PM PST by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue./Federal-run medical care is as good as state-run DMVs.)
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To: StAntKnee

Yes, the secessionist thing is something post-CW Yankees want everyone to forget, and henceforth think secession is somehow “treasonous” or “unconstitutional”. BS.

Speaking of “common knowledge” of 1812 history, no one really appreciates what happened at Baltimore. Battle of BALTIMORE, not “Ft. McHenry” which gained overarching fame just due to a song.

This stopped the Brits in their tracks and they didn’t get anywhere in the “mainland” so turned sights on the outskirts.

Baltimore and environs dug and fortified a 5-MILE-LONG “trench” north of the harbor from where the Ft. would be. After much regular fighting starting along North Point, Brits see the gigantic defenses mounted at them, coupled with ships’ failure, and turned tail.


16 posted on 01/06/2018 12:40:46 PM PST by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue./Federal-run medical care is as good as state-run DMVs.)
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To: NonValueAdded

That is the song I was thinking when I read the headline!


17 posted on 01/06/2018 3:01:59 PM PST by Davy Crocket
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To: NonValueAdded
Another set of facts not well known about the British Army in this Battle was that many were veterans of the recently concluded Napoleonic War. Napoleon abdicated after Paris had surrendered in March of 1814 and the British were very interested in closing off western expansion of the USofA. General Sir Edward Pakenham was not only a veteran general of the Peninsular Campaign (Portugal & Spain), but was also, through the marriage of his sister, brother-in-law to General Sir Arthur Wellesley, Duke of Wellington.

Pakenham was appointed to replace General Ross, killed at Baltimore, as head of British land forces in North America in September 1814. At New Orleans however, he was subordinate to British Royal Navy Admiral Sir Alexander Cochrane, a fact that led the Duke of Wellington to blame Pakenham's death upon the Admiral. Pakenham did have secret orders to continue fighting until officially and personally informed that the Peace Treaty (Treaty of Ghent) had been ratified by the US President's signature.

While the British were expecting to fight the local militias, they thought that New Orleans, having only become part of the US in 1803 as part of the Louisiana Purchase, would offer weak resistance. Before Pakenham arrived on the battlefield, a night battle on 23 December was fought by advancing US forces under General Jackson with 2100+ men against a weaker British force, General John Keane and 1800 men. While the American forces withdrew, the strength of the battle at Lacoste's Plantation, 'stood up' the British, giving Jackson time to fortify his defense lines.

In sum, the veteran British, leaders and troops, were first class and able soldiers. The fact that they were completely defeated at New Orleans probably had a lasting impression on Great Britain and may have kept them from further mischief in the following US Civil War. They were twice burned and that does give pause.

18 posted on 01/06/2018 3:33:01 PM PST by SES1066 (Happiness is a depressed Washington, DC housing market!)
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To: rockrr

Right across from the Jax brewery!


19 posted on 01/06/2018 4:05:35 PM PST by Rebelbase (The urge to save humanity is almost always only a false-face for the urge to rule it.-- H.L. Mencken)
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To: reed13k
Yes, but news traveled much slower back then.

Lousy internet speeds?

20 posted on 01/06/2018 4:05:56 PM PST by 17th Miss Regt
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