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New technology at UNM medical center combines pacemaker, defibrillator
KOB4 ^ | January 20, 2018 | Emily Jaceks

Posted on 01/20/2018 10:02:22 PM PST by nickcarraway

It's one of the most serious conditions, and a costly one for patients.

Heart failure happens when the heart can't pump enough blood and oxygen to the body, leaving those who suffer feeling absolutely terrible.

“Well I did feel a bit tired, you know, fatigued when I did do things," Lawrence Longo said.

New technology at UNM medical center combines pacemaker, defibrillator Longo says he's been through it all; the weight gain due to fluid retention, the shortness of breath, days when he said he felt like dying. He had a pacemaker installed, but it wasn't helping.

So doctors recommended going to a new technology called Resonate – a combination of a pacemaker and defibrillator.

Dr. Khoo, a cardiologist, said Resonate doesn't only pace the patient's heart, protecting them from dying suddenly – it provides an important shock should they go into cardiac arrest. The device also eliminates costly emergency room and hospital visits by monitoring patients, remotely sending data and alerts to their provider at the same time.

“We can also detect problems a lot soon than before the patient even feels bad,” Khoo said.

It's definitely had an impact on at least one patient. Longo said he's never felt better.

“My heart feels like its pumping better. I do take my blood pressure, and my blood pressure has been down. In fact it was 98 over 83, which was good, so it’s been staying down below 115,” he said.

That device is now available at UNM Sandoval Regional Medical Center. It's not cheap; before insurance, it's about $30,000 for the device and monitoring and another $150,000 for the procedure itself.

But it can be life-saving, and doctors and patients say it does improve their quality of life


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Health/Medicine
KEYWORDS: heart

1 posted on 01/20/2018 10:02:23 PM PST by nickcarraway
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To: nickcarraway

Ummmm. I thought ICDs already had pacing technology.


2 posted on 01/20/2018 10:27:48 PM PST by LukeL
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To: LukeL
I could swear the one I got had both functions. That's what they told me, anyway. It comes with a box next to my bed that tracks it and sends a signal if I start to croak. Then I go in once a year to download it to see if it's still working right.

Maybe this article is behind the times. Or maybe I'm retarded. I could be.

3 posted on 01/20/2018 10:55:03 PM PST by bagster (Even bad men love their mamas.)
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To: nickcarraway

Ummm... Blood pressure of 98/83 is terrible. Very little pulse pressure...difference between the two numbers. Heart is not pumping well. Mr. Longo is much better with his 115 systolic (high number) as long as diastolic (low number) is at least at a 40 point spread.


4 posted on 01/20/2018 11:26:56 PM PST by Bravada (Wherever I Stand, I Stand With Israel!)
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To: LukeL

Yea, I had my first one installed in 2007.


5 posted on 01/20/2018 11:49:00 PM PST by Fhios (1987 - Where's Waldo. 2017 - Where's Jeff Sessions?)
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To: LukeL

They have for years Poorly written article. I’m guessing what’s new is the ability to remotely monitor....


6 posted on 01/20/2018 11:54:42 PM PST by Mom MD ( .)
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To: LukeL

Yes. I’ve had a dual defibrillator/pacemaker (Medtronic 5076-45 & 694758) from Aug. 2009 when I dropped dead until last November when I got a new version, the DDMB1D1 which operates with a WiFi signal to a monitoring station. They can print out the data from there as well as alert medical personnel near you if there are serious problems showing up.

In the older model, which worked just find, the battery was beginning to get to a less than desired power level after 8 years of faithful service. I was supposed to get a new battery but it was easier to get a whole new combination as all they had to do was to disconnect the heart wires from the old unit, take it out, and drop in/connect the new model.

The whole operation took only 45 minutes or less and I walked out of the operating room and went home. Minor 2 to 2 and a half inch scare on my chest.

The old one could only internally record data and had to be read (over a landline phone if you still had one) or by going to the doctor’s office where a technician did a full printout of its activity over the months.

The $30,000 price for the dual purpose device sounds about right but the procedure shouldn’t cost anywhere near $150,000, esp. if they do not have to insert wires from the device directly into the heart (as I still have).

NOW, here is something you may not know if you have the new WIFI defibrillator unit. You should not be “wanded” by a security person because it could affect the Wifi signals emanating from your unit and possibly disrupt the unit’s functioning.

Show you medical card to any security officer and ask to be physically searched (No problem). Most are trained to know about defibrillators but the ones I get checked by didn’t know about the newer WiFi model and the fact that it broadcasts a continual signal.

Took a licking but keeps on ticking!


7 posted on 01/21/2018 12:53:35 AM PST by MadMax, the Grinning Reaper
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To: MadMax, the Grinning Reaper

Excellent info. Thanks Max.


8 posted on 01/21/2018 1:12:09 AM PST by bagster (Even bad men love their mamas.)
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To: nickcarraway

It delivers an “important” shock if you’re in cardiac arrest. Thank goodness, I wouldn’t want just any old shock if I’m actively dying.
Who writes these things?


9 posted on 01/21/2018 1:52:25 AM PST by GnuThere
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To: nickcarraway

My wife has had the Medtronics combo since 04.
It lasted 10 years and she has a newer model now.


10 posted on 01/21/2018 1:56:42 AM PST by Post5203 (None dare call it treason...I do. Prepared to fight...prepared to die.)
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To: LukeL

These devices have existed exactly as described for 30 years.


11 posted on 01/21/2018 2:14:33 AM PST by Jim Noble (Single payer is coming. Which kind do you like?)
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To: bagster

The developer’s website explains that their device is programmable and can be monitored and adjusted remotely to suit individual patient needs on an ongoing basis. This has some obvious advantages, such as reducing unnecessary jolts from the defribillator.


12 posted on 01/21/2018 2:14:39 AM PST by Rockingham
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To: GnuThere
Rumor has it that the shock is like getting kicked in the chest by a horse.

That's more important than a regular shock. To me, anyway.

13 posted on 01/21/2018 2:16:02 AM PST by bagster (Even bad men love their mamas.)
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To: Rockingham
Hmmm...I don't think mine has all that. I go in once a year and they put this thing around my neck that covers the device and reads it.

I guess with that new upgrade I wouldn't have to do that.

I will probably get the latest upgrade when this positronic heart runs out. I think they said it lasts ten years..

14 posted on 01/21/2018 2:18:49 AM PST by bagster (Even bad men love their mamas.)
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To: LukeL

They do. My DH had one.


15 posted on 01/21/2018 2:44:28 AM PST by sneakers (It's not the democraTIC party! It's the demoCRAT party!)
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To: MadMax, the Grinning Reaper

Looks like I need to check on what “they” are planning for me. I have had a defib since 2010. It has not gone off, and now since the battery has reached end life, they want to “upgrade” to a defib/pacemaker. I need to ask what brand and what capabilities. They will need to add a wire or two, not exactly sure, for the pacemaker function.


16 posted on 01/21/2018 4:52:09 AM PST by wita (Always and forever, under oath in defense of Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.)
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To: LukeL

Maybe it’s new to U.N.M. It’s not news, it’s an infomercial.


17 posted on 01/21/2018 4:57:23 AM PST by Babba Gi
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To: LukeL
“Ummmm. I thought ICDs already had pacing technology.”

They do, and have had for a long time.

18 posted on 01/21/2018 6:02:06 AM PST by neverevergiveup
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To: bagster

Or maybe a stem cell therapy will be available by then.


19 posted on 01/21/2018 6:53:22 AM PST by Rockingham
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To: MadMax, the Grinning Reaper

Thanks for your input, I am at that stage where they are trying to find out what is needed so all info is welcomed.

I worked as an assistant for a German scientist in Miami 45 yrs. ago, testing the IC’s from Texas Instruments to be used as well as the leads and the materials used in making the leads. I would get fresh cow blood from the local slaughter house to put the leads in and see how certain materials reacted. We would get units in from cadavers and take them apart to see what caused a failure.

Looking at the Boston Scientific unit, I am amazed at the progress made.


20 posted on 01/21/2018 7:01:05 AM PST by Colo9250
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