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To: ConservativeMind

Per Healthline

Nicotinamide riboside, or niagen, is an alternative form of vitamin B3, also called niacin.

Like other forms of vitamin B3, nicotinamide riboside is converted by your body into nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), a coenzyme or helper molecule.

NAD+ acts as fuel for many key biological processes, such as (1, 2):

Converting food into energy
Repairing damaged DNA
Fortifying cells’ defense systems
Setting your body’s internal clock or circadian rhythm
However, the amount of NAD+ in your body naturally falls with age (3).

Low NAD+ levels have been linked to health concerns like aging and chronic illnesses, such as diabetes, heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease and vision loss (1).

Interestingly, animal research has found that raising NAD+ levels may help reverse signs of aging and lower the risk of many chronic diseases (4, 5, 6).

Nicotinamide riboside supplements — such as niagen — have quickly become popular because they appear to be especially effective at raising NAD+ levels (7).

Nicotinamide riboside is also found in trace amounts in cows’ milk, yeast and beer (8).

In addition, nicotinamide riboside may provide several other benefits:

May aid weight loss: Nicotinamide riboside helped speed up the metabolism of mice. However, it’s unclear whether it would have the same effect in humans and how strong this effect really is (23).

May lower cancer risk: High NAD+ levels help protect against DNA damage and oxidative stress, which are linked to cancer development (24, 25).

May help treat jet lag: NAD+ helps regulate your body’s internal clock, so taking niagen may help treat jet lag or other circadian rhythm disorders by resetting your body’s internal clock (26).

May promote healthy muscle aging: Raising NAD+ levels helped improve muscle function, strength and endurance in older mice (5, 27).

Potential Risks and Side Effects

Nicotinamide riboside is likely safe with few — if any — side effects.

In human studies, taking 1,000–2,000 mg per day had no harmful effects (28, 29).

However, most human studies are short in duration and have very few participants. For a more accurate idea of its safety, more robust human studies are needed.

Some people have reported mild to moderate side effects, such as nausea, fatigue, headaches, diarrhea, stomach discomfort and indigestion (30).

In animals, taking 300 mg per kg of body weight (136 mg per pound) daily for 90 days had no harmful effects (31).

What’s more, unlike vitamin B3 (niacin) supplements, nicotinamide riboside should not cause facial flushing (31).


2 posted on 03/14/2019 7:26:50 PM PDT by tired&retired (Blessings)
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To: tired&retired

I took Niacin for a couple of months and had so much energy I was pulling all nighters getting all kinds of work done. I moved fast, felt lighter, better.

I ran out and a few months later I’m taking cat naps like I ordinarily do and trudging my way out in the morning. The difference really is pretty big.

I’m going to order more once my next client pays up.


3 posted on 03/14/2019 7:38:40 PM PDT by Greetings_Puny_Humans (I mostly come out at night... mostly.)
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To: tired&retired
"Nicotinamide ribosome is also found in trace amounts in cow's milk, yeast and beer"

How much beer would one need to drink to bring the level above 'trace'?

4 posted on 03/14/2019 7:38:49 PM PDT by Deaf Smith (When a Texan takes his chances, chances will be taken that's fore sure)
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To: tired&retired

Other than Vitamin D, nicotinamide riboside chloride (brand name Tru Niagen) is the only supplement I take. I take 500 mg per day, half in the morning and half at night.

One of the effects I’ve noticed is very vivid dreams at night and I actually remember them when I wake up. Anyhow, no bad side effects and I’ll see how it works out longer term. It’s not cheap if you get the real stuff.


5 posted on 03/14/2019 7:39:52 PM PDT by House Atreides (Boycott the NFL 100% — PERMANENTLY)
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To: tired&retired
Journal of Redox Biology Volume 17, July 2018, Pages 89-98 Nicotinamide riboside attenuates alcohol induced liver injuries via activation of SirT1/PGC-1α/mitochondrial biosynthesis pathway Highlights •NR could reverse ethanol induced hepatic steatosis and oxidative stress. •Boosting NAD+, NR enhanced mitochondrial functions by regulating SirT1/ PGC-1α. •SirT1 played an important role in NR's protection against alcohol liver injuries. Nicotinamide riboside (NR) is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) precursor which is present in foods such as milk and beer. It was reported that NR can prevent obesity, increase longevity, and promote liver regeneration. However, whether NR can prevent ethanol-induced liver injuries is not known. This study aimed to explore the effect of NR on ethanol induced liver injuries and the underlying mechanisms. Results We found that ethanol significantly decreased the expression and activity of hepatic SirT1 and induced abnormal expression of enzymes of lipid metabolism in mice. Both in vivo and in vitro experiments showed that NR activated SirT1 through increasing NAD+ levels, decreased oxidative stress, increased deacetylation of PGC-1α and mitochondrial function. In SirT1 knockdown HepG2 cells, NR lost its ability in enhancing mitochondrial function, and its protection against lipid accumulation induced by ethanol. Conclusions NR can protect against ethanol induced liver injuries via replenishing NAD+, reducing oxidative stress, and activating SirT1-PGC-1α-mitochondrial biosynthesis. Our data indicate that SirT1 plays an important role in the protection of NR against lipid accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunctions induced by ethanol.
9 posted on 03/14/2019 7:53:47 PM PDT by tired&retired (Blessings)
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