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Astronomy Picture of the Day
NASA ^ | 8/17/02 | K. Zwintz, H. Tirado and A. Gomez

Posted on 08/16/2002 9:17:07 PM PDT by sleavelessinseattle

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

2002 August 17
See Explanation.  Clicking on the picture will download
 the highest resolution version available.

Asteroid 2002 NY40
Credit: K. Zwintz (Univ. Viena), H. Tirado and A. Gomez (CTIO, NOAO)

Explanation: Asteroid 2002 NY40 will fly by planet Earth early in the morning August 18 Universal Time (late in the evening August 17 Eastern Daylight Time). Approaching to within about 530,000 kilometers or 1.3 times the Earth-Moon distance 2002 NY40 will definitely not be close enough to pose any danger of collision. But it will be close enough and just bright enough for experienced skygazers to see this 800 meter wide space rock in a small telescope or binoculars as it glides quickly through northern skies past the bright star Vega. It will also be close enough to ping with radar, and asteroid hunters using the large Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico expect to determine the three dimensional outline of 2002 NY40. Similar investigations of other near Earth asteroids have revealed some surprising shapes. In this five minute time exposure, recorded at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory on August 14, 2002 NY40 shows itself as a long smudge as it moves against a background of faint stars in the constellation Aquarius.

Tomorrow's picture: magnetic north




TOPICS: Astronomy; Astronomy Picture of the Day; Science
KEYWORDS: arecibo; asteroids; radiotelescopes; spaceweather; xplanets
Gotta love a thread that links to Arecibo's big Radio Telescope! Also be SURE to click on other near earth asteroids as it has an asteroidcam view of Earth!
1 posted on 08/16/2002 9:17:07 PM PDT by sleavelessinseattle
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To: sleavelessinseattle; MozartLover; Joan912; NovemberCharlie; snowfox; Dawgsquat; viligantcitizen; ...
APOD PING... The game of interplanetary billiards is afoot!
2 posted on 08/16/2002 9:19:28 PM PDT by sleavelessinseattle
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To: sleavelessinseattle
One of these times we ought to attach an ion motor to one of these and see if can capture it, bring it down to low [not real low] earth orbit.
3 posted on 08/16/2002 9:25:49 PM PDT by RightWhale
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To: RightWhale
NOW you're talking my Language!!! Hey I'm at a loss for a topic for a fun fact here...do you have a suggestion? I'm dry...thanks RW!
BR
SS
4 posted on 08/16/2002 9:28:51 PM PDT by sleavelessinseattle
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To: sleavelessinseattle
This doesn't get me out of an Astronomy fun fact, but its a nice tool for finding out what Astronomy events are happening in your area!

Click here for an astronomy event calender for your area

5 posted on 08/16/2002 9:37:21 PM PDT by sleavelessinseattle
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To: sleavelessinseattle
Conditions for seeing this object will be poor at best here. It might be possible, but only for hardcore astronomers. We'll have to rely on those in temperate climates for reports.
6 posted on 08/16/2002 9:38:44 PM PDT by RightWhale
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To: RightWhale
Astronomy Fun Fact: 65 million years ago -- A 10-kilometer
asteroid struck north of the Yucatan
Peninsula, caused a global firestorm, then a cold
snap and finally a global warming that
extinguished the dinosaurs. How Sen. Hollings survived this catastrophe remains a mystery to the present day.
7 posted on 08/16/2002 9:49:44 PM PDT by sleavelessinseattle
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To: sleavelessinseattle
N.B.: Quito, Ecuador ought to be the best place on earth for amateur astronomy, on the equator and a couple of miles up. Any night you should be able to see almost the entire sky pole to pole all the way around. Can't imagine wanting any less than that.
8 posted on 08/16/2002 9:57:43 PM PDT by RightWhale
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To: RightWhale
You raise a great point, actually...AS advances in adaptive optics (that compensate for atmospheric "mirage" distortion as light reaches a terrestrial telescope) get better, WILL there be a need to build a Bigger Better Visible light Telescope in Space? I know the computer combination of images from synchronized optical telescopes into a single high res image is creating virtual "lenses" of great size and precision.
9 posted on 08/16/2002 10:13:29 PM PDT by sleavelessinseattle
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To: sleavelessinseattle
Ok, I clicked the "other earth asteroid" link and it said:

In the year 2004, on September 29, the Earth will pass very near Toutatis, closing to within a million miles (4 times the Earth-Moon distance) - the closest approach predicted for any asteroid or comet between now and 2060.

Today's pic says:

Approaching to within about 530,000 kilometers or 1.3 times the Earth-Moon distance 2002 NY40 will definitely not be close enough to pose any danger of collision.

You think it's a misprint, or is this not that exact of a science yet?
10 posted on 08/17/2002 1:08:45 AM PDT by WSGilcrest
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To: WSGilcrest
FUD selling...Fear Uncertainty and Doubt...But frankly I'm for a true Asteroid/Comet defense system. These things can have orbits out past PLUTO! no way can all that stuff be spotted optically! Albedo too faint...It is remarkable how far off even meteor shower peak predictions are though...one such error was over 6 hours off! Peak happened in Daylight on our hemisphere Fa cryin out loud!!! Here's a description of some software that models the probability of a big strike over time... Click HERE

A comet only has to get lucky ONCE...Some place else described the race to get an effective defence against spaceborne debris as an IQ test we are not prepared to pass any time soon....BR SS!

11 posted on 08/17/2002 1:36:44 AM PDT by sleavelessinseattle
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To: sleavelessinseattle
Explanation: Asteroid 2002 NY40 will fly by planet Earth early in the morning August 18 Universal Time (late in the evening August 17 Eastern Daylight Time).

Reminder to self: Get those binoculars out !

See Explanation.  Clicking on the picture will download 
 the highest resolution version available.

Earth Nears Asteroid Toutatis
Credit: E. De Jong and S. Suzuki, JPL, NASA

12 posted on 08/17/2002 6:00:51 AM PDT by MeekOneGOP
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To: All
Bad link clicking on the picture. I didn't realize there was one,
or I'd have fixed it before posting.
13 posted on 08/17/2002 6:04:40 AM PDT by MeekOneGOP
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To: MeeknMing
You Know Saddam? I can see your house from here!
14 posted on 08/17/2002 10:56:31 AM PDT by sleavelessinseattle
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To: sleavelessinseattle
Gosh, being somewhat of a naive when it comes to computers, I don't know what to download for the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. IT has different things for us to download in order to see the "camera" correctly. But I don't know which one to chose.. ??

Has anyone got an opinion on this? I have a new Dell with a Windows XP operating system.

I don't know if this camera is going to be a live "web" cast, or just pictures that I will have needed to download a program in order to view better. Can anyone suggest what I should do?

Thanks folks. I love this thread btw!!!
15 posted on 08/17/2002 10:56:44 AM PDT by Vets_Husband_and_Wife
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To: Vets_Husband_and_Wife
Are you referring to the "cloud camera"? I need to figure out which areas of the site you're interested to start with...There were some references to Linux bandied about which I'm useless on...What is it you want to do, IOW...
The documentation I saw was what we used to refer to as
"not ready for release", meaning incomplete...
16 posted on 08/17/2002 11:18:36 AM PDT by sleavelessinseattle
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To: sleavelessinseattle
WILL there be a need to build a Bigger Better Visible light Telescope in Space?

Sure there will be continuing benefit to space telescopes, especially an adaptive array of large size such as a few million miles across. That one should be able to read a license plate on Beta Lyrae. There is probably a hardcore amateur somewhere who is doing some adaptive optics of his own, wouldn't that be a kick?

17 posted on 08/17/2002 12:11:03 PM PDT by RightWhale
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To: sleavelessinseattle
You Know Saddam? I can see your house from here!




18 posted on 08/17/2002 12:35:07 PM PDT by MeekOneGOP
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To: MeeknMing
ROFLMAO!!! BULLSEYE!!!
19 posted on 08/17/2002 12:39:39 PM PDT by sleavelessinseattle
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To: RightWhale
Wow...Okay, so I thought flying through an Aurora show was cool and you just had to show me up with a million mile diameter virtual telescope! RW, UR2much! LOL! And of course we'd want to put a LIGO Gravimetric measurement system between the optical elements so we'd have a Gravity Wave detector of unbelievable sensitivity! We'd be able to play Who dropped the neutron star out to the edge of the Universe!
20 posted on 08/17/2002 12:45:16 PM PDT by sleavelessinseattle
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To: sleavelessinseattle
There are a couple of such telescopes being built right now at NASA. One should be in operation by the end of the decade, which will enable imaging of some surface detail on earth-size planets at other stars. If they do better than the recently demised CONTOUR.
21 posted on 08/17/2002 12:58:05 PM PDT by RightWhale
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To: sleavelessinseattle
hehehe!


Rummy, you tell the Brits to keep sifting the dirt for Osama.
Next up? SADdam ! Let's get him!

22 posted on 08/17/2002 1:09:52 PM PDT by MeekOneGOP
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To: MeeknMing
HEH HEH HEH!!! Hey now this guy is a star! Got NO problems with him appearing on this thread!!! I cannot get enough truck pictures of this guy! Thanks MM! *still laughing evilly!
23 posted on 08/17/2002 3:03:19 PM PDT by sleavelessinseattle
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To: RightWhale
I knew there was a space based gravimetric system coming up but not an optical one...outstanding! Guess I'll have to watch my cholesterol to stay alive long enough to see the pics! Thnx RW!
24 posted on 08/17/2002 3:29:33 PM PDT by sleavelessinseattle
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To: sleavelessinseattle
My daughter georgia who is 12 ask, is there any asteroids around the SUN that might be thrown into earth collision by solar plasma ejection? Or is something like that possible?

Great picture and we will be watching.

25 posted on 08/17/2002 6:38:30 PM PDT by BossyRoofer
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To: BossyRoofer
What an insightful question! I'd imagine close in to the sun, the heat would break up large objects and they'd sort of join the mass ejection which DOES affect the earth's magnetosphere and communications and sometimes our power grid through induction. I know that astronauts on the space station have experienced direct visual impressions of xrays passing unhindered through the station's densest shielding during flare activity...Against closed eyelids they experienced flashes bright enough to keep them up at night...One guy even slept with a lead battery between his head and the sun!
Talk about a flash of inspiration! Its GOOD to have a nice pad of atmosphere to burn up little presents from our personal fusion furnace!
26 posted on 08/17/2002 7:04:54 PM PDT by sleavelessinseattle
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To: sleavelessinseattle
Someone put me on the apod ping list please? Thank you.
27 posted on 08/17/2002 7:20:44 PM PDT by Madcelt
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To: Madcelt
As easily said as done! I'll submit the updated list to Petuniasevan upon her return...Welcome Welcome!
28 posted on 08/17/2002 7:24:44 PM PDT by sleavelessinseattle
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To: sleavelessinseattle
LOL! Thanks, I love that one too! I posted these two on a Saddam thread
earlier today, with the Bush at the Wheel photo/caption below them.........



_______________________





29 posted on 08/17/2002 7:25:28 PM PDT by MeekOneGOP
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To: BossyRoofer
any asteroids around the SUN that might be thrown into earth collision by solar plasma ejection?

Solar plasma would be highly energetic, but it is also very thin. A lot of extremely hot gas spread out over a very large volume of space. A solar plasma ejection could affect electronics, blow a microcircuit, things like that. It is not dense enough to modify an asteroid's orbit enough to collide with earth, UNLESS the asteroid's orbit were already close to intersecting earth's orbit anyway.

30 posted on 08/17/2002 7:26:30 PM PDT by RightWhale
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To: MeeknMing
You know...Astronomers in the ME are going to have a devil of a time with transient light bursts and ground tremors purty soon and you know they play HAVOC with long exposure astrophotography...My position on the subject..."Get over it"... Get an image inverter to turn your telescope viewfinder to "right side up" viewing and watch the reduction of Baghdad HOURS before it is rebroadcast on CNN...BWAHAHA! Yer a pip!
31 posted on 08/17/2002 7:31:01 PM PDT by sleavelessinseattle
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To: RightWhale
good point...I see the primary effect of added mass in the flare as drag on all extrasolar objects in orbit around the sun...Its a change and we all know what happens if you stick a matchbook under one leg of a pool table...everything changes...Great Question! Great Answer, RW. Charateristic, I might add.
32 posted on 08/17/2002 7:34:32 PM PDT by sleavelessinseattle
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To: sleavelessinseattle
How Sen. Hollings survived this catastrophe remains a mystery to the present day.

Under the dinosaur droppings?

33 posted on 08/17/2002 7:58:58 PM PDT by Madcelt
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To: Madcelt
And YES, it was a big meadow muffin.
34 posted on 08/17/2002 8:15:19 PM PDT by Madcelt
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To: Madcelt
I can see some hungry grad student trying to back out the insulation "R" value from a fossilized dinosaur doodie! LOL!
35 posted on 08/17/2002 8:59:39 PM PDT by sleavelessinseattle
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To: sleavelessinseattle
ROFLMAO!
36 posted on 08/18/2002 7:55:30 AM PDT by Madcelt
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To: sleavelessinseattle
It probably was the "cloud" camera. We love the NASA pics. And hopefully one day there will be a "live" Web cam from a really good telescope/Observatory where we can watch the Cosmos "REALTIME" when we want to!! :o)

This ping list is fine, unless you feel there is something else we would be interested in. Feel free to ping us. We are sharing these things with our grandkids. Trying to wet their intellectual appetites, so to speak. ;o)

Thanks!
37 posted on 08/18/2002 12:09:54 PM PDT by Vets_Husband_and_Wife
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To: Vets_Husband_and_Wife
Be sure to take them to observatories, and star parties! There is nothing like putting your eye to an optic and seeing that ancient light first hand...Ironically noone in the profession really does that anymore thanks to digital imaging, but many universities and museums have great telescopes that are available to the public during special events...I can tell you from personal experience there is NO friendlier group of people than amateur astronomers...I have been a loyal attender of the Table mountain star party here in Washington and have NEVER been told "don't touch that!" People practically wrestle you over to their huge expensive telescope and Make you adust it yourself to overcome your fear of the instrument...Most of the ones I looked through required a STEPLADDER to get to the eyepiece! ALSO pick up a copy of Sky and Telescope magazine sometime and show them the color shots in the center...That's what converted me...
Pictures of Nebulae and Galaxies...Oh yeah!
38 posted on 08/18/2002 3:00:46 PM PDT by sleavelessinseattle
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