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Tea Party gimmick gets exposed: Why it was always a tool of the Republicans
Salon ^ | May 22, 2014 | Heather Digby Parton

Posted on 05/22/2014 3:33:40 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet

The myth that the movement was all about economic issues -- not social ones -- is finally laid bare. Here's how.

Jim Newell hit the nail on the head about the alleged “revenge of the GOP establishment” in this week’s primary elections. Yes, they are all Tea Partyers now. Who needs the label when they are getting everything they want from the establishment?

In fact, the Tea Party has always been populated by the rank and file far right of the party. Yes, they expressed hostility to their elected officials in Washington. They were angry that the Democrats won a majority and they blamed their leadership for letting that happen. But as John Boehner explained just yesterday:

"You get in these primary elections – they are hard-fought battles and sometimes – listen, there is not that much, not that big a difference between what you call the tea party and your average conservative Republican."

Indeed. Nonetheless, it is interesting that so far in these primaries the major victory claimed by the Tea Partyers doesn’t feature a standard libertarian-ish right-wing Republican railing against Big Government and babbling about Benghazi!™. It features a hardcore member of the Christian right, which is hardly the image of the Tea Party in the political press. That would be Ben Sasse of Nebraska, the Yale-educated history professor who had the backing of Tea Party groups like Freedomworks, the Senate Conservatives Fund and Club for Growth, and Tea Party icons Sarah Palin and Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas. He won the primary against establishment-backed State Treasurer Scott Osborne. Yes, he hates Big Government as much as any right-wing Republican, that goes without saying. But Sasse is motivated by his belief that the U.S. is a Christian nation under siege from that Big Government, not by his belief in free markets and low taxes.

Sarah Posner at Religion Dispatches unearthed his doctoral thesis from 2004 and it’s a fascinating treatise on the origins of the modern religious right in America. Unlike most historians, he believes that the conservative movement grew up in the 1960s not out of rebellion against the civil rights stances of the Democratic Party but rather the “secularization” of the culture in the wake of the Supreme Court rulings banning school prayer and Bible reading. He even goes so far as to claim that rather than a cynical decision to stoke the flames of Southern racism with the Southern strategy, it was Richard Nixon’s deep understanding of the Christian culture that led him to persuade evangelicals and conservative Catholics to join the GOP and usher in the era of conservatism in the last decades of the 20th century. It’s a novel understanding of that history, to say the least. Most historians cite Nixon’s pursuit of blue-collar Catholics as part of the strategy to peel off working-class votes with racial resentment. But Sasse’s dissertation is evidently persuasive in at least some respects.

But regardless of his level of accomplishment as a scholar, Ben Sasse clearly sees the world through the lens of a conservative Christian crusader. According to his website, he is a proponent of the most radical interpretation of religious freedom that’s in circulation today on the far right:

Ben Sasse believes that our right to the free exercise of religion is co-equal to our right to life. This is not a negotiable issue. Government cannot force citizens to violate their religious beliefs under any circumstances. He will fight for the right of all Americans to act in accordance with their conscience.

One wonders if he believes the child molestation at Warren Jeffs’ polygamous compound or Shariah Law honor killings are also non-negotiable religious beliefs that the government cannot force those people to violate under any circumstances. In any case, he is certainly a proponent of the Christian right manifesto, the Manhattan Declaration, which aims to change the strategy of the religious right from a purely moral argument to a legal doctrine that exempts religious adherents from following the law of the land.

One might wonder why the so-called libertarian Tea Partyers would back such a fellow even if he were right on all their economic issues. But one of the major misapprehensions about the Tea Party has always been the idea that it was not socially conservative, as if all those tricorner hat-wearing patriots were solely concerned with tax rates and regulations. The Pew Poll showed otherwise years ago:

Tea Party supporters tend to have conservative opinions not just about economic matters, but also about social issues such as abortion and same-sex marriage. In addition, they are much more likely than registered voters as a whole to say that their religion is the most important factor in determining their opinions on these social issues. And they draw disproportionate support from the ranks of white evangelical Protestants.

A Tea Party by any other name would smell as socially conservative. Just ask Ted Cruz, another Ivy League Tea Partyer who recently made a pilgrimage to Liberty University and declared, “These are troubled times, and religious liberty, the very first liberty in the Bill of Rights, the very first protection we have, has never been more in peril than it is right now.” Or Sarah Palin, another Tea Party favorite who wears her social conservatism on her sleeve.

The point is that whether it’s the establishment winning as they ostensibly did in this week’s primaries or the Tea Party upsetting the conventional wisdom as they did last week in nominating Ben Sasse, it makes no difference. The three-legged stool of the GOP — family values, small government and national security — is as solid as it’s ever been, whatever they choose to call themselves. Sure, they may have a few Rand Paul fans ineffectually batting at one of those legs, but the Tea Party is right there with the establishment holding it steady.

*******

Digby is the pseudonym of liberal political blogger Heather Parton from Santa Monica, California who founded the blog Hullabaloo. She has been called one of the "leading and most admired commentators" of the progressive blogosphere.[1]

Digby began as a commenter on the blogs of Bartcop and Atrios and launched her own blog on January 1, 2003,[2] calling it Hullabaloo "because one function of blogs is to cause a ruckus"[3] and decorating it with a picture of a screaming Howard Beale from the film Network. She has been joined by other bloggers on Hullabaloo, including composer Richard Einhorn, who blogs under the name "Tristero".

Digby was a Navy brat who graduated from Lathrop High School in Fairbanks, Alaska. She studied theater at San Jose State University (then known as San Jose State College) and worked on the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System and for a number of film companies, including Island Pictures, Polygram, and Artisan Entertainment.[2]

She won the 2005 Koufax award for blog writing and accepted the Paul Wellstone Award on behalf of the progressive blogosphere from the Campaign for America's Future at their "Take Back America" conference.[4] Digby had initially kept her identity secret and it was widely assumed that Digby was male until she made an appearance at the 2007 CAF conference to accept the award.[4] Digby has since started writing regularly at Salon.[5] She also won the 2014 Hillman Prize for Opinion and Analysis Journalism.


TOPICS: Issues; Parties; State and Local
KEYWORDS: cruz; palin; teaparty; tedcruz
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1 posted on 05/22/2014 3:33:40 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

What an ass.

Course it is Salon and they require it.


2 posted on 05/22/2014 3:35:56 PM PDT by cripplecreek (Remember the River Raisin.)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Oh, okay. Now I know who I am. Thanks, Salon!


3 posted on 05/22/2014 3:39:36 PM PDT by andyk (I have sworn...eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man.)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

The writer is from California. That explains it. A clueless writer who hails from a truly clueless state.


4 posted on 05/22/2014 3:44:38 PM PDT by dowcaet
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

What’s with these lovers of socialism? The Tea Party is just regular folks who want their lives, freedoms, and country back. God bless them.


5 posted on 05/22/2014 3:45:33 PM PDT by PapaNew
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
Richard Nixon’s deep understanding of the Christian culture that led him to persuade evangelicals and conservative Catholics to join the GOP and usher in the era of conservatism in the last decades of the 20th century

There was a reason it was referred to as Godless Communism with disgust.

And a further reason why people left an increasingly Godless Democratic party.

Which is that the latter had become the former.

6 posted on 05/22/2014 3:46:38 PM PDT by Regulator
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
One wonders if he believes the child molestation at Warren Jeffs’ polygamous compound or Shariah Law honor killings are also non-negotiable religious beliefs

The left, openly displaying ignorance.

7 posted on 05/22/2014 3:51:39 PM PDT by DJ MacWoW (The Fed Gov is not one ring to rule them all)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
Tea Party supporters tend to have conservative opinions not just about economic matters, but also about social issues such as abortion and same-sex marriage. In addition, they are much more likely than registered voters as a whole to say that their religion is the most important factor in determining their opinions on these social issues. And they draw disproportionate support from the ranks of white evangelical Protestants.

A Tea Party by any other name would smell as socially conservative. Just ask Ted Cruz, another Ivy League Tea Partyer who recently made a pilgrimage to Liberty University and declared, “These are troubled times, and religious liberty, the very first liberty in the Bill of Rights, the very first protection we have, has never been more in peril than it is right now.” Or Sarah Palin, another Tea Party favorite who wears her social conservatism on her sleeve.

The tea party is made up of the more conservative, which also means the more religious, and more social conservative, only idiots thought that the tea party was made up of libertarians.

8 posted on 05/22/2014 4:04:30 PM PDT by ansel12 ((Ted Cruz and Mike Lee-both of whom sit on the Senate Judiciary Comm as Ginsberg's importance fades)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

What is this fool babbling about? Doesn’t Salon have any journalistic standards? Yeah, I know the answer to that one.....


9 posted on 05/22/2014 4:04:40 PM PDT by Some Fat Guy in L.A. (Still bitterly clinging to rational thought despite it's unfashionability)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
Archie Bunker used to call the kind of commie-lite stuff they publish on Salon “Pinko.”

It still fits.

10 posted on 05/22/2014 4:10:18 PM PDT by mojito (Zero, our Nero.)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
She's just an evil screeching harpy. The real criminals are the people who give her access to their audience to spread her lies.

Yup, Hate filled Leftwing kook witch-harpy from California.

Link

11 posted on 05/22/2014 4:10:51 PM PDT by DiogenesLamp (Partus Sequitur Patrem)
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To: dowcaet

The hosts of FR hail from California as do many thousands
of FReepers. There is a message for you if you click on
Sivad at the bottom of this post.


12 posted on 05/22/2014 4:16:11 PM PDT by Sivad (NorCal red turf)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Presenting Ms. Digby. Kind of has moonbat written all over it.

13 posted on 05/22/2014 4:19:32 PM PDT by mojito (Zero, our Nero.)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Someone should tell the former Democratic County Committee woman I met at a TEA Party rally.


14 posted on 05/22/2014 4:32:49 PM PDT by sgtyork (Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy)
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To: Sivad
The hosts of FR hail from California as do many thousands of FReepers. There is a message for you if you click on Sivad at the bottom of this post.

There are good folk in California, but they are far outnumbered by evil ones, Especially in the big cities. Much of the evil propaganda from which we suffer is spewed out of Los Angeles disguised as entertainment.

Victor Davis Hanson is one of my favorite columnists, and he constantly opines about the rot permeating California.

My apologies to the decent folk of California for any inadvertent offense, but your state has been tarnished by the activities of very evil people who dominate the culture there. (And the rest of the nation as well.)

15 posted on 05/22/2014 4:36:52 PM PDT by DiogenesLamp (Partus Sequitur Patrem)
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To: ansel12

Many people on the left still dismiss the tea party as the same old religious right, but the evidence says they are wrong. The tea party has strong libertarian roots and is a functionally libertarian influence on the Republican Party.

http://www.cato.org/publications/policy-analysis/libertarian-roots-tea-party


16 posted on 05/22/2014 6:06:14 PM PDT by Star Traveler (Remember to keep the Messiah of Israel in the One-World Government that we look forward to coming)
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To: DiogenesLamp

Very nice post and much appreciated by this Californian. There
are certainly evil people who dominate the popular culture thru the
left wing media. But that is not the only culture. As you never see
the culture of the normal folks of Kansas, Oklahoma, and South
Carolina portrayed by the dominant media, you also don’t get the
big picture when it comes to small town California.

Part of California’s problem started when in good times the
politicians loosened welfare requirements and opened the
floodgates to the “takers” from everywhere, those who are
happy to vote for more goodies for themselves. Many of those
people who created our problems came from elsewhere including
politicians we ALL know like Pelosi, Boxer, Maxine Waters, and
Willie Brown. I do fear for our Texan friends who are in the
process of improving their economy and destroying their
state at the same time. Massive population increases can
bring the kind of negative results that are killing California.
Thanks again.


17 posted on 05/22/2014 6:16:15 PM PDT by Sivad (NorCal red turf)
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To: Star Traveler

Actually you have it reversed, most people think of the tea party as kind of libertarian because it’s focus has not been on social issues, that is why the article is written as it is.

Actually the tea party is made up of what one would expect, conservatives, people who are more religious, and more social conservative than the average republican.

“New Poll: Tea Party Overwhelmingly Christian And Socially Conservative. by JJ SUTHERLAND October 05, 2010”

“Tea Party support correlates to religious affiliation, survey finds 2011 By Dan Gilgoff, CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor”

“Evangelicals and Tea Party Overlap in Congress, Public”

“Libertarians Are Not the Tea Party.
“Though politicians and analysts often conflate the two, libertarians have different views on many issues than Tea Partiers—and they’re not as big a faction of the GOP.”

“The Christian Right in Disguise?
New research confirms that the Tea Party firmly unites right-wing politics and evangelical Christianity, a fact so problematic that it can make even Christine O’Donnell speechless.”

About half of the tea party is not only social conservatives and religious, but call themselves part of the hated, religious right.


18 posted on 05/22/2014 6:49:39 PM PDT by ansel12 ((Ted Cruz and Mike Lee-both of whom sit on the Senate Judiciary Comm as Ginsberg's importance fades)
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To: ansel12

That’s not a quote from me, but from the article that was linked ... :-) ...


19 posted on 05/22/2014 6:51:14 PM PDT by Star Traveler (Remember to keep the Messiah of Israel in the One-World Government that we look forward to coming)
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To: Sivad

What killed California, aside form the immigration, was that California was never right wing, social conservative, like Texas is, and always was.

California always leaned rino/libertarian, so it didn’t have the underlying muscle to prevent being absorbed by the left.

Texas actively fights for it’s conservatism AND, it’s Christian conservatism.


20 posted on 05/22/2014 6:53:49 PM PDT by ansel12 ((Ted Cruz and Mike Lee-both of whom sit on the Senate Judiciary Comm as Ginsberg's importance fades)
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To: Star Traveler

Right, the quote you posted was from a libertarian organization, I think we were to assume that it was what you wanted to serve as your claim about the tea party, in an attempt to portray it as not made up of social conservatives.


21 posted on 05/22/2014 6:58:10 PM PDT by ansel12 ((Ted Cruz and Mike Lee-both of whom sit on the Senate Judiciary Comm as Ginsberg's importance fades)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Zyloptic idiots


22 posted on 05/22/2014 7:16:07 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously-you won't live through it anyway-Enjoy Yourself ala Louis Prima)
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To: ansel12

Really? Then explain LBJ and the Great Society and while you
are at it explain Ann Richards. If those two could rise to the
pinnacle of power in Texas then don’t even try to tell us that
a swelling population can’t sweep the libs back to power in
Texas. And, if you think I am trying to take pot shots at Texas
then think again.

California ALWAYS leaned rino/libertarian? Oh, puleeeeze!
Even when we elected and re-elected that noted rino RW Reagan
as Governor?


23 posted on 05/22/2014 7:16:27 PM PDT by Sivad (NorCal red turf)
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To: ansel12

It started as Libertarian and there is still a huge segment that is Libertarian. I’m not, by the way.


24 posted on 05/22/2014 7:19:18 PM PDT by Star Traveler (Remember to keep the Messiah of Israel in the One-World Government that we look forward to coming)
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To: Sivad

Yes California has always been known as a liberal state, even when voting republican.

Texas has always been known as a conservative state, even when it voted democrat.


25 posted on 05/22/2014 7:26:39 PM PDT by ansel12 ((Ted Cruz and Mike Lee-both of whom sit on the Senate Judiciary Comm as Ginsberg's importance fades)
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To: Star Traveler

Sorry, but the tea party is mostly made up, and always was, of social conservatives.

Did you really think it was a movement of social liberals, weak on national defense?


26 posted on 05/22/2014 7:29:33 PM PDT by ansel12 ((Ted Cruz and Mike Lee-both of whom sit on the Senate Judiciary Comm as Ginsberg's importance fades)
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To: ansel12

Your blanket statements about the historic politics of California
are wrong. Because you make your claims with conviction does
not make them any more true. That also goes for your claims
about the Tea Party which STARTED as a protest against government
over spending and taxes. Although many people who identify
with the TP are socially conservative, it was economic issues that
spawned the movement,


27 posted on 05/22/2014 7:51:33 PM PDT by Sivad (NorCal red turf)
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To: Sivad

Even in the time of Reagan, when I lived in both Texas and California, largely as a drifter and hitchhiker, California was know as the promise land for social liberals, while people were terrified to hitchhike through Texas because it was tough, and didn’t take guff from lefties.

Texas was thought of during the 60s and 70s just as it is thought of today, even harsher actually, with Austin being seen as an oasis in the middle of a bunch of right wingers, and Christians.

California has always been seen as the place to flee to if you were a liberal and especially a social liberal, to escape the right wingers and Christians, regardless of which right wing state you lived in, it was known as a rino/libertarian type state, regardless of who the governor was.

People largely came to California, because it was famously liberal, and never more than moderate.


28 posted on 05/22/2014 7:55:21 PM PDT by ansel12 ((Ted Cruz and Mike Lee-both of whom sit on the Senate Judiciary Comm as Ginsberg's importance fades)
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To: Sivad

My history of California is not inaccurate and I never said anything about the focus of the tea party.


29 posted on 05/22/2014 7:57:11 PM PDT by ansel12 ((Ted Cruz and Mike Lee-both of whom sit on the Senate Judiciary Comm as Ginsberg's importance fades)
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To: ansel12

I was around when it was formed out of the libertarians, so I saw it happen. I’ve been to many different meetings over the years and they make their presence known. The fact that there are others who have joined in doesn’t change how it started or the fact that there is a large segment of them there.

Perhaps you’re not aware of it, but I sure am from seeing it firsthand, and their influence is there, too.

But, like I said, that isn’t me, so I don’t get in on some of their stuff, but keep to my mine.


30 posted on 05/22/2014 8:01:37 PM PDT by Star Traveler (Remember to keep the Messiah of Israel in the One-World Government that we look forward to coming)
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To: Star Traveler

So your vote is that libertarians formed the tea party, and new comers started out numbering them.

Libertarians do make that argument and credit Ron Paul and his followers as being the tea party.


31 posted on 05/22/2014 8:09:12 PM PDT by ansel12 ((Ted Cruz and Mike Lee-both of whom sit on the Senate Judiciary Comm as Ginsberg's importance fades)
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To: ansel12

Have a degree in history, do you? When you say ‘always’ you
betray your ignorance. In the 1930s they came to California
for agricultural and oil field jobs, not liberalism. When they
came in the 1940s they came for military and war industry jobs,
not liberalism. They did not come for anything remotely
related to liberalism until welfare benefits requirements were
loosened.


32 posted on 05/22/2014 8:12:10 PM PDT by Sivad (NorCal red turf)
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To: ansel12

I don’t vote Libertarian ... :-) ...

Here’s another quote ...

For decades, faith and family have been at the center of the conservative movement. But as the Tea Party infuses conservatism with new energy, its leaders deliberately avoid discussion of issues like gay marriage or abortion.

God, life and family get little if any mention in statements or manifestos. The motto of the Tea Party Patriots, a large coalition of groups, is “fiscal responsibility, limited government, and free markets.” The Independence Caucus questionnaire, which many Tea Party groups use to evaluate candidates, poses 80 questions, most on the proper role of government, tax policy and the federal budgeting process, and virtually none on social issues.

The Contract From America, which is being created Wiki-style by Internet contributors as a manifesto of what “the people” want government to do, also mentions little in the way of social issues, beyond a declaration that parents should be given choice in how to educate their children. By contrast, the document it aims to improve upon — the Contract With America, which Republicans used to market their successful campaign to win a majority in Congress in 1994 — was prefaced with the promise that the party would lead a Congress that “respects the values and shares the faith of the American family.”

Tea Party leaders argue that the country can ill afford the discussion about social issues when it is passing on enormous debts to future generations. But the focus is also strategic: leaders think they can attract independent voters if they stay away from divisive issues.

“We should be creating the biggest tent possible around the economic conservative issue,” said Ryan Hecker, the organizer behind the Contract From America. “I think social issues may matter to particular individuals, but at the end of the day, the movement should be agnostic about it. This is a movement that rose largely because of the Republican Party failing to deliver on being representative of the economic conservative ideology. To include social issues would be beside the point.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/13/us/politics/13tea.html


33 posted on 05/22/2014 8:13:49 PM PDT by Star Traveler (Remember to keep the Messiah of Israel in the One-World Government that we look forward to coming)
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To: Star Traveler

Yet we know the makeup of the tea party, we know what the current focus for those social conservatives who make up the tea party is, but it doesn’t change anything about the facts of who they are.

The tea party is made up of social conservatives.

When you see the tea parties turn AGAINST social conservatism and start pushing the libertarian/rino agenda, then tell me.


34 posted on 05/22/2014 8:17:18 PM PDT by ansel12 ((Ted Cruz and Mike Lee-both of whom sit on the Senate Judiciary Comm as Ginsberg's importance fades)
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To: Sivad

No it isn’t ignorance.

We were talking about modern times and the 60s, Reagan’s era.

We weren’t talking about the 1930s when my mother’s family arrived in California because of agriculture, or after the war, when my mother married my father, and they came to California to take over 3 businesses, a garage and filling station, and a diner.

If you think that California used to be seen as the home of the right wingers, and Texas as home of the liberals, then you don’t know your history.


35 posted on 05/22/2014 8:22:35 PM PDT by ansel12 ((Ted Cruz and Mike Lee-both of whom sit on the Senate Judiciary Comm as Ginsberg's importance fades)
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To: ansel12

Those particular Tea Party activists don’t have to be “against” some of those social conservative issues, pertaining to gay marriage or abortion - or even military and monetary support for Israel (for example) ... they just have a “no comment” or “hands off” position and don’t fight for it - in order just to concentrate on those original issues put forth by Libertarians and bring in a wider audience. They sacrifice those issues ... not “fight against them”.


36 posted on 05/22/2014 8:26:56 PM PDT by Star Traveler (Remember to keep the Messiah of Israel in the One-World Government that we look forward to coming)
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To: Sivad
They did not come for anything remotely related to liberalism until welfare benefits requirements were loosened.

The first time I ever met people moving to California, or anywhere, for the welfare, was during the 1960s, they were driving form back east or Chicago or somewhere.

37 posted on 05/22/2014 8:27:56 PM PDT by ansel12 ((Ted Cruz and Mike Lee-both of whom sit on the Senate Judiciary Comm as Ginsberg's importance fades)
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To: Star Traveler

What I’m telling you is who the tea party is, so far you want to argue what the tea party is focused on, which no one disagrees about.

“”The tea party is made up of the more conservative, which also means the more religious, and more social conservative, only idiots thought that the tea party was made up of libertarians.””


38 posted on 05/22/2014 8:31:16 PM PDT by ansel12 ((Ted Cruz and Mike Lee-both of whom sit on the Senate Judiciary Comm as Ginsberg's importance fades)
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To: ansel12

It doesn’t matter to me “who they are” if they ignore those issues some of them say they believe in ... if they do that “ignoring” ... “as a group”.


39 posted on 05/22/2014 8:34:39 PM PDT by Star Traveler (Remember to keep the Messiah of Israel in the One-World Government that we look forward to coming)
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To: ansel12

No, your California history knowledge is just about nil. And when
I cite electoral evidence that Texas has not been exclusively
conservative (LBJ, Richards) you offer denials, not explanations.
I’m not sitting in your living room....the “because I said so” argument
doesn’t work here. Your personal experience does not a
comprehensive history make.


40 posted on 05/22/2014 8:37:51 PM PDT by Sivad (NorCal red turf)
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To: ansel12

Let me say it another way ... the Tea Party does not fit me and my issues as a conservative, so I don’t want to be considered as part and parcel of their agenda and politics.


41 posted on 05/22/2014 8:38:04 PM PDT by Star Traveler (Remember to keep the Messiah of Israel in the One-World Government that we look forward to coming)
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To: Star Traveler

They sure represent my issues, just not all of them, or all at once, and they don’t oppose any of mine.


42 posted on 05/22/2014 8:40:08 PM PDT by ansel12 ((Ted Cruz and Mike Lee-both of whom sit on the Senate Judiciary Comm as Ginsberg's importance fades)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
he believes that the conservative movement grew up in the 1960s not out of rebellion against the civil rights stances of the Democratic Party

His history is wrong. His analysis is wrong. His only purpose is to create confusion and misunderstanding. He is a scrubber for the marxists.

43 posted on 05/22/2014 8:45:37 PM PDT by oldbrowser (This looks like a make it or break it point for America.)
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To: ansel12

The big thrust of big welfare spending came in the ‘70s under
the younger Brown although some can be traced to the elder
Gov Brown in the 60s.


44 posted on 05/22/2014 8:45:38 PM PDT by Sivad (NorCal red turf)
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To: Sivad

No, my California history is fairly respectable.

I didn’t say anything about Texas being perfectly anything, I did correctly point out that it is famously right wing, which is accurate, you keep bringing up a Senator from the 1950s, and a 1 term democrat governor from the early 90s.

You sound young, or like you only started paying attention to such things not very many years ago.

Do you know why California was a magnet for the left during the 50s and 60s, and 70s, and Texas never has been?

Do you think homosexuals in Texas, and dopers, and pro-abortion people, did not dream of California liberalism since before you were born?


45 posted on 05/22/2014 8:48:11 PM PDT by ansel12 ((Ted Cruz and Mike Lee-both of whom sit on the Senate Judiciary Comm as Ginsberg's importance fades)
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To: Sivad

Yet my first two shocking experiences with welfare in California were in the 1960s, they already had a national reputation that had people moving here for the welfare.


46 posted on 05/22/2014 8:49:49 PM PDT by ansel12 ((Ted Cruz and Mike Lee-both of whom sit on the Senate Judiciary Comm as Ginsberg's importance fades)
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To: Star Traveler
I trace the atmosphere for the tea party to Palin. Choosing her exposed something that had always been hiding, just how much many of our leading columnists, and campaign professionals and GOP supporting organizations had hated and feared us, remember the Peggy Noonan type shockers, with some of them actually voting and endorsing Obama to stop whatever it was that Palin was unlocking and inspiring?

Palin exploded on us and created something new, and while most of us were discouraged and the party broken by the Obama takeover, Palin never wavered, she never even took a breath, she instantly went to campaigning for a Governor's race within weeks of that election, and then kept up the fight, until something came from her inspiration.

For many months she was taking all of the medias's hate, and doing it alone, and proving that it wasn't fatal, from her courage, we started seeing other's slowly emerge, and testing the waters, getting bolder, remember how Perry and DeMint, seemed to gain boldness from watching her, Palin was injecting a swagger and confidence into what had at first been a fairly timid and splintered conservative movement, Palin nationalized us, united us, gave us a symbol and a feeling of being a coherent national force. We should not overlook the fact that her being a sitting Governor, and the recent Vice Presidential candidate, gave us a lot of instant weight.

Palin wasn't the leader of the tea party, or the founder/creator, but we all sensed and knew, that she was our girl, our mascot, or unifying symbol, our publicist, I don't know the word, but she was a giant force related to the tea party, I just don't think it would have gone so well without a Sarah Palin proceeding it, and as a part of it. Palin was the crowd and media drawing phenomena, everywhere she went it was 10,000 people and overflow crowds.

Remember events like Searchlight, Nev. March 27, 2010 when about 20,000 showed up, Where CNN reported
"Former vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin there in Searchlight, Nev., was the backyard of Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, but today it's the backdrop of this Tea Party Express - making a stop here," Whitfield said. "Hundreds of people, at least dozens of people - we haven't gotten a count of how many people turned out there. We heard Sarah Palin talk about everything about the campaign, to unseat Sen. Reid to what she calls ObamaCare, on the heels of that health care vote and even talking about her definition of her love of America."

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47 posted on 05/22/2014 8:58:35 PM PDT by ansel12 ((Ted Cruz and Mike Lee-both of whom sit on the Senate Judiciary Comm as Ginsberg's importance fades)
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To: ansel12

I like Sarah Palin and support her in whatever she is doing ... but, at the same time, do you realize how many “Palin haters” there are on Free Republic?

I do, because I’ve had them come after me here on this forum ... :-) ...


48 posted on 05/22/2014 9:04:46 PM PDT by Star Traveler (Remember to keep the Messiah of Israel in the One-World Government that we look forward to coming)
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To: ansel12

Here is something for you to massage and it has been my point from
the start. You can fool yourself into believing that California just
drew liberals back in the day and maybe Texas draws only stand-up
conservative types. The fact is that population growth brings
liberalism, period. Where are the most liberal parts of Texas,
California, or anywhere? The cities. Turn your towns into cities then
see what happens. I’m just trying to provide you with some reality.
If you choose to believe that your righteousness is going to
prevail against the votes of the masses of uninformed then good
luck. BTW I am in my 60s and I have a BA in history with a
Concentration in California history.


49 posted on 05/22/2014 9:50:43 PM PDT by Sivad (NorCal red turf)
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To: Sivad

I’m trying to tell why the two states are different, you are wrong to think it is just immigration, and/or demographics.

The nature and the generations old reputations of the two states are different, and rightfully so.

Texas and California took different paths long ago, in fact, they were always different in regards to being conservative and liberal.

Fifty and 60 years ago this state was often voting republican but was proud of it’s open and “enlightened” ways, well, here you are.

Neither one of us has ever seen a right wing, social conservative California, and neither one of us has ever seen a liberal, social liberal Texas.

How do you think Texas keeps moving right, yet has the second largest population in America?

The answer is that Texas and Texans are fundamentally different from California, and were, generations ago.

What do you remember the national reputation of the two states being in 1965 or 1970?


50 posted on 05/22/2014 10:10:16 PM PDT by ansel12 ((Ted Cruz and Mike Lee-both of whom sit on the Senate Judiciary Comm as Ginsberg's importance fades)
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