Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

The Fabric of Their Lives U.S. cotton subsidies make the poor poorer
Reason ^ | November 7, 2003 | Jacob Sullum

Posted on 11/07/2003 4:33:19 PM PST by RJCogburn

During a cross-country drive in July 1989, my car broke down in the Arizona desert sometime around noon. My cat, Miles, who had long, black fur, was not pleased. I managed to find a phone and call a tow truck, and during the long, slow, non-air-conditioned ride to the nearest service station, with Miles panting at my side, I had plenty of time to take in the scenery: row after row of cotton.

Since cotton is a water-intensive crop, the middle of a desert seemed a strange place to grow it. Similar oddities can be observed in other arid areas of the country where the federal government provides farmers with irrigation water at prices far below the cost of supplying it.

But the taxpayer-subsidized water is just the beginning. U.S. cotton farmers also receive crop-specific payments that encourage them to grow more than they could sell if, like most business people, they had to recoup their production costs. According to a 2002 report from Oxfam International, these subsidies amount to nearly $4 billion year, or $230 an acre.

By comparison, the market value of America's cotton crop in 2001 was about $3 billion. "In an economic arrangement bizarrely reminiscent of Soviet state planning principles," Oxfam noted, "the value of subsidies provided by American taxpayers to the cotton barons of Texas and elsewhere in 2001 exceeded the market value of output by around 30 percent."

Even with all this help, U.S. cotton farmers insist they cannot make a go of it unless the government also pays companies to buy their crop. Based on numbers obtained under the Freedom of Information Act, the Environmental Working Group recently posted a database on its Web site listing the payments received by companies that export American cotton or use it to make yarn, fabric, sheets, towels, or clothing.

This arrangment, known as Step 2 of the "cotton competitiveness program," has cost taxpayers $1.7 billion during the last eight years. The payments have included $107 million to the Allenberg Cotton Co. of Cordova, Tennessee; $102 million to Dunavent Enterprises of Fresno, California, and Memphis, Tennessee; and $87 million to Cargill Cotton of Cordova, Tennessee.

You begin to see how Tennessee gets back $1.26 in spending for every dollar it sends to Washington. And these textile companies already benefit from trade barriers that restrict foreign competition, at the expense of American consumers and producers in other countries who do not have the same clout on Capitol Hill.

Speaking of foreign competition, the cotton subsidies are shameful not only because U.S. farmers should have to play by the rules of the market but because this welfare program for the well-to-do has a ruinous impact on poor farmers in other countries who do not enjoy such largess. By artificially boosting the cotton supply, subsidies depress world prices, driving farmers in countries such as Mali, Benin, and Burkina Faso out of business. Oxfam estimates that U.S. subsidies cost cotton-growing African countries $300 million a year.

For American cotton farmers (whose average net worth is about $800,000) the subsidies may be the difference between growing cotton and growing something else, or between farming and pursuing a different line of work, assuming they can't compete without the government's support. For African farmers who earn something like $800 a year, the subsidies can be the difference between eating and starving.

Given this reality, the anger of African leaders is perfectly understandable. Referring to U.S. and European subsidies, Mali's finance minister told the BBC: "The money that those countries put into agricultural subsidies is five times what they give as development assistance. And we've always said to those rich countries, 'You're hypocrites. You tell us to play [by] the rules of the open market at the same time as you subsidize your farmers.'"

The U.S. refusal to reconsider its cotton subsidies was one of the main reasons for the collapse of the World Trade Organization talks in Cancun. Brazil, joined by several other countries, has filed a WTO complaint challenging both the direct farm subsidies and the Step 2 payments to cotton buyers as unfair trading practices.

The National Cotton Council, which says the Step 2 program is "vital to U.S. cotton's competitiveness," complains "there is nothing new" in the Environmental Working Group's report on the program. The same could be said for the pathetic excuses offered by those who profit at the expense of others instead of making an honest living.


TOPICS: Government
KEYWORDS: agriculture; cotton; subsidies
If only we had Republican control we could stop this.
1 posted on 11/07/2003 4:33:20 PM PST by RJCogburn
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: RJCogburn
We have cooton crops popping up on Kansas. (Thrilling for me because I had never seen it before.) I heard they were moving cotton in because it actually needs less water than traditional Kansas crops like wheat, corn, sorgum (whatever)
2 posted on 11/07/2003 4:54:05 PM PST by eccentric
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: RJCogburn; Willie Green
By comparison, the market value of America's cotton crop in 2001 was about $3 billion. "In an economic arrangement bizarrely reminiscent of Soviet state planning principles," Oxfam noted, "the value of subsidies provided by American taxpayers to the cotton barons of Texas and elsewhere in 2001 exceeded the market value of output by around 30 percent."
Steel tarrifs likewise: they only benifit American steel mill owners at the expense of consumers and hundreds of lost jobs in other industries. Help stamp out protectionism in all its ugly forms.

Billy Gene, call your office!
3 posted on 11/07/2003 5:30:18 PM PST by Asclepius (karma vigilante)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: eccentric
We have cooton crops popping up on Kansas. (Thrilling for me because I had never seen it before.)

You'll be thrilled to know that cotton farmers use arsenic to defoliate the cotton plants prior to harvesting. I hope you have deep water wells.

4 posted on 11/07/2003 5:47:50 PM PST by Paleo Conservative (Do not remove this tag under penalty of law.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Asclepius
Ending the cotton subsidies makes sense to me.
Our textile industry is darn near collapsed anyway,
all we do is export cotton and it comes back as finished textiles to further undermine domestic textile plants.
All that transnational shipping is inefficiency that's made "economic" by special interest legislation.
Same thing goes for the targetted steel tariffs: Too high on some types of steel, and riddled with loopholes and exemptions on others. Doesn't help anybody, only hurts.

We'd be MUCH better off with an across-the-board, relatively low (10~15%), flat-rate "revenue tariff" on ALL imported goods. The proceeds from such a tariff could then be used to further reduce other forms of domestic taxation, benefitting EVERYBODY. The heck with special interest manipulation of our tax policies.

5 posted on 11/07/2003 6:02:33 PM PST by Willie Green (Go Pat Go!!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Willie Green
Cut spending massively, and we could eliminate the income tax and all the social engineering exemptions, substituting your tarriff to fund whats left of the fedgov.

But I'd like to see massive cuts first. Most congresscritters today would just add your tax and keep all the others.

6 posted on 11/07/2003 6:39:19 PM PST by secretagent
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: RJCogburn; JohnHuang2; MeeknMing; shaggy eel; Byron_the_Aussie; Asclepius; Willie Green
The feral gummint's welfare payments to such of America's New Welfare Rich -- its "farmers" -- are a crime against Mankind.

Example: Huge quantities of the millions of feral-gummint created tons of stockpiled grains were dumped by "USAID" in previously agricultural exporter Somalia to the extent that, in quick succession, every farmer, every farmer-dependant business and the entire Somalia economy were bankrupted and mass-starvation almost immediately followed.

The USAID parasites, by then bored with Somalia and finding the environment they had created there distasteful and unpleasant and unable to meet the requirements of their colonial potentate-like spouses and no-neck chilleren -- tipped off their Socialist-Internationl media mates and pulled up stakes for other countries to experience -- and to plunge into US-Agricultural-Subsidy-Policy ruin.

And in came the by then wildly-flailing GHW Bush, the network anchors, the US Marines, the execrable Arkansas aberrations, the un, Delta Force, Les Aspin -- and a couple of RPGd Blackhawks .............

And all of that from the unexpected consequences of vote-buying welfare to parasitical thieving bastards who dare to call themselves, both "Americans" and "farmers."
7 posted on 11/08/2003 12:11:06 AM PST by Brian Allen ( Rebellion to tyrants is obedience to God - Thomas Jefferson)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Willie Green
I'm with you on the idea of revenue tariffs, but I think that there is one more source of revenue that government should exploit. In all cases where the plaintiff claims that "it's not about the money", all money awarded to the plaintiff should be taxed at 99%. (That leaves a little bit left for the legal fees)
8 posted on 11/08/2003 12:22:37 AM PST by per loin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Brian Allen
And all of that from the unexpected consequences of vote-buying welfare to parasitical thieving bastards who dare to call themselves, both "Americans" and "farmers."

Boy, it would be nice if farming was more of a "direct sell" proposition. Farmers could then choose to sell their products to people who appreciate a safe, economical, food supply...or NOT to those who don't.

A secure, safe, and wholesome food supply is probably the most basic requirement of a stable country. Reliance on third-world hellholes for our basic supplies (including steel, by the way) is ignorant, at best, and treasonous in reality. I will assume that you fall into the former category, due to your lack of knowledge about grain trading. I am by no means a protectionist, but radical free traders are seriously the most greedy, short-sighted, un-patriotic people I have ever encountered.

Oh, and your original premise about farmers being rich...thanks on behalf of all farmers on this forum for the best laugh in a long time!

9 posted on 11/08/2003 12:42:48 AM PST by garandgal
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: garandgal; Brian Allen
ignorant, at best, and treasonous in reality.

most greedy, short-sighted, un-patriotic people

Words fail me. Stupid comments is the best I can muster this early in the morning, but hardly do justice.

10 posted on 11/08/2003 4:32:28 AM PST by RJCogburn ("You have my thanks and, with certain reservations, my respect.".......Lawyer J. Noble Daggett)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: garandgal
Bullshit.

And, what's worse: Clich?d totalitarian-socialist bullshit, at that.

Support the tax-payer-subsidized "American" un "farmer."

America's New Welfare-Rich!
11 posted on 11/08/2003 4:54:02 AM PST by Brian Allen ( Rebellion to tyrants is obedience to God - Thomas Jefferson)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Willie Green
We'd be MUCH better off with an across-the-board, relatively low (10~15%), flat-rate "revenue tariff" on ALL imported goods. The proceeds from such a tariff could then be used to further reduce other forms of domestic taxation, benefitting EVERYBODY.
Here we disagree. And what about imported services? Why do want to punish only consumers who consume imported goods?
The heck with special interest manipulation of our tax policies.
Here we agree entirely. Well said.
12 posted on 11/08/2003 8:56:14 AM PST by Asclepius (karma vigilante)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson