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To: blam
I don't doubt that these plants were modified. But, how? Science can't claim that people living 6000 - 10,000 years ago were ignorant stone age hunter gatherers living at the whim of weather and large beasts, yet claim, in the same breath, that they "domesticated" plants.

Why have no new plants become "domesticated" since?

The evidence just doesn't add up. Something major is missing here.
23 posted on 11/13/2003 5:16:14 PM PST by captain_dave
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To: captain_dave
"Why have no new plants become "domesticated" since?"

Just off the top of my head...Brocclli, cauliflower, brussel sprouts, cabbage and collards all came from a wild cabbage plant in England.

Both my mom and dad came from farming families, each year at harvest time, they would select seeds from the best looking of the harvest and those seeds would be the next years crop.
That's how the ancients did it, each year for hundreds (probably thousands) of years they just kept selecting seeds each year from the most desireable. From year to year, the change was almost undiscernable but, in the long run, changed the corn plant into what we know today.

24 posted on 11/13/2003 5:35:16 PM PST by blam
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To: captain_dave
Why have no new plants become "domesticated" since?

Lots of plants have been "domesticated" in recent times. I can think of the strawberry off the top of my head. It used to be the tiny wild berry that you can still find in fields but has been bred to be much larger and sweeter by man. See Strawberry history.

29 posted on 11/14/2003 12:32:09 AM PST by Straight Vermonter (We secretly switched ABC news with Al-Jazeera, lets see if these people can tell the difference.)
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