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Iranian Alert -- November 21, 2003 -- IRAN LIVE THREAD
The Iranian Student Movement Up To The Minute Reports ^ | 11.21.2003 | DoctorZin

Posted on 11/21/2003 12:09:35 AM PST by DoctorZIn

The US media almost entirely ignores news regarding the Islamic Republic of Iran. As Tony Snow of the Fox News Network has put it, “this is probably the most under-reported news story of the year.” But most American’s are unaware that the Islamic Republic of Iran is NOT supported by the masses of Iranians today. Modern Iranians are among the most pro-American in the Middle East.

There is a popular revolt against the Iranian regime brewing in Iran today. Starting June 10th of this year, Iranians have begun taking to the streets to express their desire for a regime change. Most want to replace the regime with a secular democracy. Many even want the US to over throw their government.

The regime is working hard to keep the news about the protest movement in Iran from being reported. Unfortunately, the regime has successfully prohibited western news reporters from covering the demonstrations. The voices of discontent within Iran are sometime murdered, more often imprisoned. Still the people continue to take to the streets to demonstrate against the regime.

In support of this revolt, Iranians in America have been broadcasting news stories by satellite into Iran. This 21st century news link has greatly encouraged these protests. The regime has been attempting to jam the signals, and locate the satellite dishes. Still the people violate the law and listen to these broadcasts. Iranians also use the Internet and the regime attempts to block their access to news against the regime. In spite of this, many Iranians inside of Iran read these posts daily to keep informed of the events in their own country.

This daily thread contains nearly all of the English news reports on Iran. It is thorough. If you follow this thread you will witness, I believe, the transformation of a nation. This daily thread provides a central place where those interested in the events in Iran can find the best news and commentary. The news stories and commentary will from time to time include material from the regime itself. But if you read the post you will discover for yourself, the real story of what is occurring in Iran and its effects on the war on terror.

I am not of Iranian heritage. I am an American committed to supporting the efforts of those in Iran seeking to replace their government with a secular democracy. I am in contact with leaders of the Iranian community here in the United States and in Iran itself.

If you read the daily posts you will gain a better understanding of the US war on terrorism, the Middle East and why we need to support a change of regime in Iran. Feel free to ask your questions and post news stories you discover in the weeks to come.

If all goes well Iran will be free soon and I am convinced become a major ally in the war on terrorism. The regime will fall. Iran will be free. It is just a matter of time.

DoctorZin

PS I have a daily ping list and a breaking news ping list. If you would like to receive alerts to these stories please let me know which list you would like to join.


TOPICS: Extended News; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: iaea; iran; iranianalert; protests; southasia; studentmovement; studentprotest
Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin”

1 posted on 11/21/2003 12:09:36 AM PST by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin”

2 posted on 11/21/2003 12:11:52 AM PST by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
It is just a matter of time.

Yep.

Thanks DZ for bringing all the updates to us. Your work in doing so has been very impressive and greatly appreciated.

Regard's,

EGPWS

3 posted on 11/21/2003 12:20:13 AM PST by EGPWS
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To: DoctorZIn
U.S. Accuses Iran of Trying to Make Nuclear Weapons

NewsMax.com Wires
Friday, Nov. 21, 2003

VIENNA, Austria – The United States accused Iran of trying to make nuclear arms, in harsh comments Friday at a U.N. atomic agency meeting that reflected the split between Washington and key European nations over how far to go in censuring Tehran for past activities.
Unable to bridge that rift, delegates at a board of governors' meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency decided to adjourn until next week in hopes of finding a compromise.

IAEA spokeswoman Melissa Fleming said the meeting would reconvene Wednesday, after adjourning later Friday following delegates' speeches.

The break would be a chance for high-level negotiations to continue in the capitals of the 35 board members, she said.

The move followed a failure by IAEA delegates to reconcile U.S. wishes for strong censure of Iran's past covert nuclear activities and European hopes of encouraging Tehran's newfound openness by refraining from overtly harsh language or any formulation that would result in the Security Council's involvement.

Addressing delegates, U.S. Ambassador Kenneth Brill assailed Iran for 18 years of "violations and lies," including enriching uranium, processing small amounts of plutonium and other activities that Washington says point to a weapons agenda.

"Iran systematically and deliberately deceived the IAEA and the international community about these issues for year after year after year," he said. The purpose, he said, was "the pursuit of nuclear weapons."

Such conduct by Iran "constitutes noncompliance with its safeguards obligations," Brill said, in language that indirectly accused Tehran of violating the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, an act that normally results in the Security Council's involvement.

In comments that provoked an unusually sharp response from IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei, Brill suggested a statement in ElBaradei's report on Iran was "questionable" in saying there was no "evidence" it had tried to build nuclear weapons.

Brill said that no "proof" would have been the proper phrase.

Evidence Is Proof?!

ElBaradei dismissed the argument as "disingenuous," according to diplomats at the meeting. "In our dictionary, 'evidence' is the same as 'proof,"' he said.

Fleming said Elbaradei "takes issue with the U.S. accusation that the agency has threatened its credibility. We believe that we are impartial and credible and that actually our credibility has been enhanced."

Earlier, Iran submitted a letter to the board agreeing to open its nuclear programs to pervasive spot inspections, giving up attempts to wait until it saw the text of the resolution and approved its language.

But diplomats, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said Iran continued to insist it had the right to withdraw its promise to accept such inspections if the resolution made reference to the Security Council's involvement or contained other language it found unacceptable.

Such a move, however, would almost guarantee a strong resolution that might even meet U.S. wishes to have Iran declared in violation of safeguard agreements, triggering possible involvement by the Security Council.

Asked what links there were between a soft resolution and his country's acceptance of wider inspections as well as its decision to suspend uranium enrichment, both of which the board has demanded, chief Iranian delegate Ali Akbar Salehi said, "They all go together."

Salehi suggested the United States was isolated in the board.

"We think that the American delegation, or the U.S. as a whole, is sort of a hostage to its own accusations," he told reporters. "And I think the majority of the board are looking forward to see that this ... is resolved peacefully."

He suggested that Germany, France and Britain, the chief backers of a relatively soft resolution, had pledged to keep the issue from going to the Security Council if Iran continued to cooperate with the agency's efforts to probe its nuclear past and present.

"It's not only a promise on their side; this is a promise of every thoughtful, wise and prudent member of the board," he said.

Before the discussion moved to the board members' capitals, a draft discussed in Vienna and quoted to The Associated Press by a senior diplomat would have given the board the right to call an emergency session immediately should any evidence surface that Iran was guilty of "significant failures."

Again the U.N. Yaks but Doesn't Act

ElBaradei has said he wants a strongly worded report that nonetheless stops short of asking for the Security Council's involvement.

Determining whether Iran tried to build nuclear weapons "will take some time and much verification effort," ElBaradei told the board.

On Thursday, diplomats speaking on condition of anonymity said the IAEA identified Russia, China and Pakistan as probable sources for equipment used by Iran for possible nuclear weapons development. They gave no other details.

Identification of some of Iran's nuclear suppliers brings the agency closer to solving the puzzle over its past activities, which the Americans and others say point to a weapons agenda.

While acknowledging that some of its enrichment centrifuges had traces of weapons-grade highly enriched uranium, Iran insists its enrichment program was low-level and only for power generation. It asserts the high-level traces were inadvertently imported on material it purchased abroad.

http://www.newsmax.com/archives/articles/2003/11/21/103637.shtml
4 posted on 11/21/2003 7:39:38 AM PST by F14 Pilot
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To: F14 Pilot
10 Iranian bank staffers wounded in Istanbul bombings

Payvand's Iran News
11/20/03

Some 10 staffers of Iranian bank in Istanbul were wounded, four of them critically, by terrorist bombings in the city, the president of the bank told IRNA on Thursday.

President of the Istanbul Branch of Iran's "Mellat Bank" Younes Hormozian said the bank was adjacent to the point where the bombs went off, adding that the bombs had completely destroyed the building of the bank.

Hormozian also said that the Turkish police have launched a strict surveillance on the area.

The Mellat Bank has two other branches in Turkey's Izmir and Ankara. The Istanbul Branch of the bank is its main branch in Turkey.

Two huge explosions in Istanbul early Thursday killed at least 15 people and wounded 320 in what appeared to have been a terror attack on the British Consulate, the Turkish media reported.

http://www.payvand.com/news/03/nov/1130.html
5 posted on 11/21/2003 7:45:36 AM PST by F14 Pilot
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To: DoctorZIn
U.S. Slams UN Watchdog, Suspects Iran Still Lying

November 21, 2003
Reuters
Louis Charbonneau

VIENNA -- The United States accused the U.N. nuclear watchdog on Friday of weakening its credibility by not taking a tougher stand against Iran's nuclear ambitions.

Washington says Iran has a secret program to develop atomic bombs and was enraged when an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) report concluded there was "no evidence" of this.

The U.S. ambassador to the United Nations in Vienna said the use of this phrase was "highly unfortunate."

"This misleading phrasing moved both (U.S.) government officials and academic experts across the political spectrum to expressions of disbelief that the institution charged with... scrutinizing nuclear proliferation risks was dismissing important facts," Kenneth Brill told the IAEA board.

The Agency report said Iran concealed a uranium enrichment program for 18 years and secretly reprocessed plutonium useable in weapons. It said there was no evidence of an arms program but the jury was still out as to whether one existed.

The United States now wants a draft U.N. nuclear resolution condemning Iran for concealment -- which could eventually bring sanctions -- but Britain, France and Germany want a softer line.

Diplomats from both sides were at loggerheads over a text after talks late into Thursday in Vienna, the Agency's base.

"So much of what (Iran) has said in the past year about its nuclear program has turned out to be false that there is no rational basis simply to assume the contrary now," Brill said.

Other European states have joined Washington in refusing to back a revised French, German and British draft resolution for being too weak in its condemnation of Iran's cover-up.

Washington hard-liners want Iran found in "non-compliance" with its international nuclear non-proliferation obligations and to be told that future breaches will bring Tehran to the U.N. Security Council for possible sanctions.

Diplomats had hoped a final draft would be submitted to the IAEA's Board of Governors on Friday but an Agency spokeswoman said it would now be tabled next Wednesday at the earliest.

ANNOYANCE WITH THE "BIG THREE"

"The Americans are annoyed with the big three, the Europeans are annoyed with the big three and Tehran is annoyed with the big three," a Western diplomat told Reuters before the IAEA board began its second day of closed-door meetings on Friday.

Several diplomats said the French, British and Germans had annoyed other Europeans on the IAEA board by monopolizing the drafting process and refusing to strengthen it to express views of European capitals who feel closer to Washington's position.

"No one is happy with them," another Western diplomat said.

The Iranians, on the other hand, have been worried the trio might back out of a promise they made in October not to support a resolution declaring Iran in non-compliance with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT).

The draft, seen by Reuters, "strongly deplores Iran's past breaches" but does not use the term non-compliance. Washington has rejected this version, diplomats said.

The IAEA board formally approved Iran's intention to sign the NPT additional protocol, which will give the IAEA the right to conduct more intrusive, short-notice inspections to flush out any secret weapons-related activity.

The Agency said on Thursday it was already conducting inspections in Iran as if the protocol was in force.

Tehran has made it clear it will not sign the document if the board passes a resolution using the term "non-compliance."

http://abcnews.go.com/wire/US/reuters20031121_169.html
6 posted on 11/21/2003 8:58:15 AM PST by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Iran Withholding Letter to the IAEA Board

November 21, 2003
The Associated Press
Dow Jones Newswires

VIENNA -- The U.N. nuclear agency's chief warned on Friday that an agreement on how harshly to censure Iran for 18 years of covert nuclear activities could be days away as U.S. and European diplomats wrestled with the text.

The board of governors' meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency was to begin its second day after adjourning Thursday at Iran's request. European countries and Washington were using the break to decide how far to go in recognizing Iran's recent willingness to throw open its nuclear facilities to agency inspections.

IAEA Director-General Mohamed ElBaradei told The Associated Press that the board meeting, originally set to end on Friday, could drag on until next Wednesday.

"It will take some time," he said "I think everybody is still interested in reaching consensus."

The Iranians, meanwhile, were withholding a letter they had promised to submit to the board agreeing to throw their nuclear programs open to pervasive spot inspections, diplomats said. Iran was waiting for guarantees that any resolution wouldn't be too harsh in condemning their past covert activities, the diplomats added.

If the Iranians renege on their promise of more thorough inspections, sentiment could grow for a strong resolution that might even meet U.S. wishes to refer Iran's past noncompliance with IAEA agreements to the U.N. Security Council.

Washington insists that Iran wants to build nuclear weapons. The U.S. administration wants the IAEA to declare Tehran in violation of its obligations under the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty and pass the matter to the Security Council, a move which could trigger sanctions against Iran.

Iran says its nuclear program is only geared toward generating electricity.

http://framehosting.dowjonesnews.com/sample/samplestory.asp?StoryID=2003112111160012&Take=1
7 posted on 11/21/2003 8:59:08 AM PST by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Tehran Release Qods-day Statement

November 21, 2003
Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting
IRIB News

Tehrani people participating in the Qods day rally held Friday stressed the right of the Palestinian nation to self-determination in the form of "one vote for every Palestinian."

A statement issued at the end of the rally read that "the world and the Middle East region in particular, need peace and this important objective could be attained only through restoring the rights of the Palestinian nation."

The 7-article statement also made reference to the remarks of the late founder of the Islamic Republic Imam Khomeini who said "every Muslim and freedom-seeking person ought to pay his debt to Palestine" and stressed the mission of Muslim countries as well as the Organization of Islamic Conference (OIC) towards the Palestinian issue.

It also condemned such artificial plans as the "roadmap" and said according to the Supreme Leader of the Islamic Revolution making use of oil as an arms against Israel was an obligation for Muslims.

The statement further held the US responsible for the Zionists' inhumane crimes in the region and condemned the policies and activities of the global hegemony in their support for Israel.

It warned the "White House ring leaders" against "occupying Muslim countries including Afghanistan and Iraq and making threats to other Islamic states, such as Syria, Lebanaon and Iran" and advised them" to leave the Middle East".

http://www.iribnews.com/Full_en.asp?news_id=192928
8 posted on 11/21/2003 8:59:56 AM PST by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
If the Iranians renege on their promise of more thorough inspections, sentiment could grow for a strong resolution that might even meet U.S. wishes to refer Iran's past noncompliance with IAEA agreements to the U.N. Security Council.

Any bets on how the votes would add up at the Sec. Council?

9 posted on 11/21/2003 9:00:36 AM PST by Pan_Yans Wife ("Your joy is your sorrow unmasked." --- GIBRAN)
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To: DoctorZIn
Iran alone has 30,000 political prisoners

By AMIR TAHERI
Jerusalem Post
11.21.2003

Anyone looking for a Muslim Nelson Mandela is bound to be disappointed. Muslim tyrannies do not allow a serious opponent to live long enough, even in prison, to acquire the iconic status that the former ANC leader won in South Africa.

The apartheid regime, evil as it was, observed some rules. Muslim tyrannies observe none, except the dictates of their survival instincts. Had Mandela been held in a Muslim tyranny, he would have been dead and forgotten long before the world knew his name.

The Muslim world accounts for some 80 percent of political prisoners in the world. But none are allowed exposure that might enable them to acquire a Mandela-like star status.

Prisoners at the opposite end of the ideological spectrum to the regime become non-persons - seldom seen even by their families, and never spoken of. The only prisoners allowed some exposure are those who shared the regime's roots before breaking with it for personal and/or political reasons.

In Iran, for example, many opponents of Khomeinism, from monarchists to Marxists, when captured, were simply murdered between 1980-1997.

Today, there are an estimated 30,000 political prisoners in Iran. Most are lower or mid-ranking democrat, monarchist, Marxist or other leftist elements that lack the name-recognition needed for "Mandelaization." No one knows how many are still alive.

Our search for potential Mandelas, therefore, has to focus on the 2,000 or so prisoners who emerged from within the regime.

This is a motley crowd and includes former hostage-takers, former terrorists, repentant Khomeinist clerics, and former high officials.

The longest-held prisoner in this category is Abbas Amir-Entezam, aged 70, who was deputy prime minister in the mullahs' first cabinet in 1979. He was jailed on a charge of espionage for the CIA in 1980 and has been behind bars ever since.

Also noteworthy is Hashem Aghajari, a former Revolutionary Guard member, who started calling for a separation of mosque and state last year, now in prison under a suspended death sentence.

Mention must also be made of Grand Ayatollah Hussein-Ali Montazeri, aged 81, who has been under house arrest for some 15 years. In 1979, he was the Islamic Revolution's number-two, after Khomeini, who named him his political heir. Montazeri broke with Khomeini in 1986 and since then, in his own words, "has tried to pay for some of my sins in the revolution."

That's about it. Sorry, guys, no Mandela in our neck of the woods.

The writer, an Iranian author and journalist, is editor of the Paris-based Politique Internationale.

http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=JPost/JPArticle/ShowFull&cid=1069304427836&p=1006953079845
10 posted on 11/21/2003 9:08:11 AM PST by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Iran alone has 30,000 political prisoners

By AMIR TAHERI
Jerusalem Post
11.21.2003

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1026223/posts?page=10#10
11 posted on 11/21/2003 9:10:18 AM PST by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Sobering.

Where is the MORAL outrage from the leftists on this one?

They aren't saying, "One man's political prisoner is another man's freedom fighter."
12 posted on 11/21/2003 9:13:13 AM PST by Pan_Yans Wife ("Your joy is your sorrow unmasked." --- GIBRAN)
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To: DoctorZIn
Call for an End to Impunity for Murderers in Iran

November 21, 2003
Reporters Without Borders
RSF

Reporters Without Borders has called on the Iranian authorities to break the impunity enjoyed by murderers and especially those who instigated killings, on the fifth anniversary of the serial murders of journalists and intellectuals.

In November and December 1998 several intellectuals and opposition figures were murdered in Iran, including Daryush and Parvaneh Forouhar, prominent liberal opposition figures, Majid Charif, editorial writer for the monthly Iran-é-Farda, writers and journalists Mohamad Mokhtari and Mohamad Jafar Pouyandeh.

A few months earlier Pirouz Davani, editor-in-chief of the newspaper Pirouz disappeared without trace and his body was never found. This wave of killings and disappearance led to angry protests in a significant section of the reformist press.

"We have reached the conclusion that highly-ranked figures are implicated in this case, figures whom we cannot challenge. That is why this file is frozen, " said Hossein Ansari-Rad, Iran's head of the Article 90 Commission of Parliament, whose role is to investigate written complaints against the executive, legislature or judiciary.

In January 1999, the intelligence ministry officially acknowledged that some of its agents were implicated in killings and announced the arrest of dozens of suspects. In January 2001, 15 agents of the intelligence ministry were convicted in the Forouhar murder case. Three were sentenced to death and 12 were sentenced to prison terms. Three others suspected of involvement were acquitted.

The case then went to the supreme court, which confirmed the verdict. Only two people were sent to jail for 15 years. As for the Davani case, the authorities never showed any inclination to investigate it further. Those who ordered his disappearance have therefore been guaranteed complete impunity.

There is never any discussion about who were the masterminds behind the killings.

A few weeks ago the Forouhar's daughter Parastou told Radio Farda - that broadcasts from outside Iran - that "after five years of the files going two and fro between the different justice departments, there is no chance of a satisfactory outcome. Now we are sure that Iranian justice refuses to investigate this case and refuses to punish the murderers and those behind the murder."

All the families of victims have complained that the question of who instigated the killings has never been raised. Since November 2002, they have been making complaints to international justice organisations. Reporters Without Borders supports these families and hopes that the international bodies will do everything within their power to see that justice is done.

(norddelafrique@rsf.org / northernafrica@rsf.org / iran@rsf.org)
Bureau Nord de l'Afrique - Iran / Northern Africa - Iran desk

Reporters sans frontières / Reporters Without Borders
Agnès Devictor
5, rue Geoffroy-Marie
75009 Paris - FRANCE
Tél. (33) 1 44 83 84 84
Fax. (33) 1 45 23 11 51

http://www.rsf.fr/article.php3?id_article=8580
13 posted on 11/21/2003 9:20:40 AM PST by DoctorZIn
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To: F14 Pilot; DoctorZIn; All
I'm basically ignorant when it comes to nuclear power and weapons. However, wasn't there some information about Iran's capability regarding "heavy water"? That is ONLY necessary for weapons production... so, I wonder if it has been confirmed.

Any assistance on this, is appreciated.
14 posted on 11/21/2003 9:21:30 AM PST by Pan_Yans Wife ("Your joy is your sorrow unmasked." --- GIBRAN)
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To: DoctorZIn
U.S. Envoy Criticizes U.N. Agency on Iran

November 21, 2003
The Associated Press
Vanessa Gera

VIENNA, Austria -- An American envoy criticized the U.N. nuclear agency Friday for going too easy on Iran, accusing Tehran of "violations and lies" and provoking an unusually sharp response from the agency's director.

Diplomats called the exchange unprecedented in the more than two decades since the International Atomic Energy Agency's 35-nation board of governors began meeting as the agency's executive body.

It reflected tensions dividing the board as it wrestles with the language of a resolution that would balance U.S. demands for a harsh response to Iran's past nuclear cover-ups and Europe's calls for milder language in recognition of Tehran's recent pledges to cooperate.

After two days of failing to find consensus, the board adjourned its meeting until Wednesday in hopes of finding a compromise to bridge the trans-Atlantic divide. IAEA spokeswoman Melissa Fleming told reporters the pause would give a chance for high-level negotiations.

Addressing delegates, U.S. envoy Kenneth Brill suggested a statement in IAEA Director-General Mohamed ElBaradei's report on Iran was "questionable" in saying there was no "evidence" that Iran had tried to build nuclear weapons. No "proof" would have been the proper phrase, Brill said.

ElBaradei dismissed the argument as "disingenuous," according to diplomats inside the meeting. "In our dictionary, evidence is the same as proof," he said.

Fleming said ElBaradei "takes issue with the U.S. accusation that the agency has threatened its credibility," adding: "We believe that we are impartial and credible and that actually our credibility has been enhanced."

Brill assailed Iran for "violations and lies" that stretched over 18 years, including enriching uranium, processing small amounts of plutonium and other activities that Washington says point to a weapons agenda.

"Iran systematically and deliberately deceived the IAEA and the international community about these issues for year after year after year," he said. The purpose, he said, was "the pursuit of nuclear weapons."

Such conduct by Iran "constitutes noncompliance with its safeguards obligations," Brill said. The language indirectly accused Iran of violating the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty — an act that normally results in U.N. Security Council involvement.

Earlier, after hours of delay, Iran submitted a letter to the board agreeing to open its nuclear programs to pervasive spot inspections instead of waiting until seeing the text of the resolution.

But diplomats, who asked for anonymity, said Iran continued to insist it had the right to withdraw its promise to accept the inspections if the resolution made reference to Security Council involvement or contained other language it found unacceptable.

Such a move, however, would almost guarantee a strong resolution that might even meet U.S. wishes to have Iran declared in violation of safeguard agreements — triggering possible Security Council involvement.

Asked what links there were between a soft resolution and his country's acceptance of wider inspections as well as its decision to suspend uranium enrichment — both board demands — Ali Akbar Salehi, the chief Iranian delegate, said: "They all go together."

Salehi suggested the United States was isolated in the board.

"We think that the American delegation — or the U.S. as a whole — is sort of a hostage to its own accusations," he told reporters. "And I think the majority of the board are looking forward to see that this ... is resolved peacefully."

He suggested that Germany, France and Britain — the chief backers of a relatively soft resolution — had pledged to keep the issue from going to the Security Council if Iran continued to cooperate with agency efforts to probe its nuclear past and present.

"It's not only a promise on their side, this is a promise of every thoughtful, wise and prudent member of the board," he said.

Before the discussion moved to the board members' capitals, a draft discussed in Vienna and quoted to The Associated Press by a senior diplomat would have given the board the right to immediately call an emergency session should any evidence surface that Iran was guilty of "significant failures."

ElBaradei has said he wants a strongly worded report that nonetheless stops short of asking for Security Council involvement.

Determining whether Iran tried to build nuclear weapons, "will take some time and much verification effort," ElBaradei told the board.

On Thursday, diplomats speaking on condition of anonymity told the AP that the agency identified Russia, China and Pakistan as probable sources for equipment used by Iran for possible nuclear weapons development. They gave no other details.

Iran asserts the high-level traces were inadvertently imported on material it purchased abroad.

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=540&ncid=736&e=3&u=/ap/20031121/ap_on_re_mi_ea/nuclear_agency_iran
15 posted on 11/21/2003 9:37:37 AM PST by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Bush Warns Iran To Adhere To Non-Proliferation Treaty

November 21, 2003
Dow Jones Newswires
Alex Keto

SEDGEFIELD, England -- President George W. Bush warned Iran he expects that country to abide by the nuclear non-proliferation treaty and to turn over any al-Qaida suspects it may be holding.

Bush made the comments in an interview with an Arabic-language newspaper based in London on Wednesday. The White House released the transcript on Friday.

"They must adhere to the non-proliferation treaty that they agreed to. And they must be transparent and open and honest with the world about their ambitions," Bush said.

The U.S. strongly suspects that Iran has a clandestine program in place to build nuclear weapons. The International Atomic Energy Agency has found traces of highly enriched uranium and plutonium in Iran but says it sees no evidence of a weapons program. On the other hand, the IAEA has also said it doesn't have enough evidence to prove Iran doesn't have a nuclear weapons program in place.

Bush has sought to rally the E.U. to join with the U.S. in confronting Iran over the issue.

Bush cited this effort and reiterated "we all need to speak with a unified voice that says to the Iranians 'get rid of your nuclear weapons ambitions'."

Bush also said the Iranians need to turn over any al-Qaida suspects they may be holding. The Iranian government has admitted it is holding several al-Qaida suspects including high-ranking members of the organization.

At various times, the Iranians have offered to send any suspect to his country of origin.

Bush indicated this would be fine with him.

"We would hope that those al-Qaida operatives were sent back," Bush said.

-By Alex Keto, Dow Jones Newswires; 202-862-9256; Alex.Keto@dowjones.com

http://framehosting.dowjonesnews.com/sample/samplestory.asp?StoryID=2003112115300008&Take=1
16 posted on 11/21/2003 10:21:20 AM PST by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
"Today, there are an estimated 30,000 political prisoners in Iran."

Shocking.

I didn't realize there was such a vast amount.
17 posted on 11/21/2003 11:36:57 AM PST by StilettoRaksha
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To: DoctorZIn
Millions boycotted governmental anti-Semite rallies

SMCCDI (Information Service)
Nov 21, 2003

Millions of Iranians boycotted today the sham show of force and anti-Semite action organized by the Islamic republic regime forcing it to bring more "professional" demonstrators and forced young school students and governmental employees, especially from the security forces and army, to compensate the lack of popular support.

Free food, pocket money and promises of walfare didn't work and in Tehran alone, with over 14 millions of habitants, the regime was not able to bring more than 70 or 80 thousands of "demonstrators" who were carried by buses placed under the supervision of the Islamic Propagation Office and other organismes affiliated to the clerical leadership.

Iranians showed once again the rejection of any hate or discriminatory action but especially of the Islamic regime which had placed big hopes to play the good feelings of Iranians in order to create a show of force in its current unprecedented needy time.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_3717.shtml
18 posted on 11/21/2003 11:51:35 AM PST by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
U.S. Slams United Nations Watchdog, Suspects Iran Still Lying

http://wireservice.wired.com/wired/story ^ | Friday, November 21, 2003 | Louis Charbonneau
Posted on 11/21/2003 7:34 AM PST by freetradenotfree

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1026450/posts
19 posted on 11/21/2003 11:53:05 AM PST by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Yesterday evening on Brent Humes's Special Report, he interviewed Monsoor Ijaz. Ijaz claimed he had hard intelligence that the Republican Guard reporting to the ruling Iran clerics are protecting Osama Bin Laden and his number two man in Iran near the Iraqi border. He described Osama's disguise in detail. Since this interview, the story has all but disappeared from the radar screen. Any idea why?
20 posted on 11/21/2003 11:58:32 AM PST by hresources
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To: DoctorZIn
Fire Bomb Thrown at UK Embassy in Iran

November 21, 2003
Reuters
Reuters.co.uk

TEHRAN -- A fire bomb has been hurled at the British Embassy compound in central Tehran, but no one was hurt and little damage was caused.

The attack, which followed suicide bomb attacks on British targets in Istanbul on Thursday that killed 27 people, was not preceded by any warnings and there was no immediate claim of responsibility.

"We're in touch with the Iranian authorities and we're reviewing our security arrangements," a British diplomat told Reuters.

Iranian officials were not immediately available to comment.

The incident occurred at 3:30 p.m. (12 p.m. British time) on Friday at the back gate of the embassy's large walled compound in central Tehran.

"The incendiary device was thrown by an individual who was in a Peykan," the diplomat said, referring to the car based on the Hillman Hunter that is by far the most common vehicle on Iran's roads.

"It struck the gate and caused a small fire on both sides of the gate," the diplomat said.

Iran is generally considered to be a low security risk in the Middle East and attacks against Western embassies, businesses or individuals are rare.

But the British embassy has been the target of a number of attacks this year, including four shootings against embassy buildings in August and September following the arrest by Britain of a former Iranian diplomat wanted by Argentine authorities. No one was injured in the shootings.

Britain sent non-essential staff and family members home and closed its visa section following those attacks and had been preparing to resume normal services prior to Friday's incident.

The British mission also bore the brunt of protests in the run-up to the war against Iraq. A truck laden with fuel smashed into the front gate of the embassy compound and a small homemade grenade was tossed over its walls. The truck driver was killed but no one else was hurt in those incidents.

The United States has not had an embassy in Tehran since shortly after the 1979 Islamic revolution.

http://www.reuters.co.uk/newsPackageArticle.jhtml?type=topNews&storyID=407426&section=news
21 posted on 11/21/2003 2:12:10 PM PST by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Rights Monitors Concerned Over Fate Of Iranian Student Who Spoke With UN

November 21, 2003
Radio Free Europe
Azam Gorgin/Charles Recknagel

Prague -- When the UN's special rapporteur on freedom of expression, Ambeyi Ligabo, visited Tehran earlier this month, his purpose was to meet freely with Iranians and learn more about the human rights situation in the country.

But while he was an official guest of the government, the UN representative's welcome did not come without a price. The price -- which has only become apparent since his departure -- was a harsh crackdown by the hard-line-dominated judiciary on at least one of those who talked to him.

Within hours of meeting Ligabo, an Iranian student who presented the UN delegate with names of political prisoners mysteriously disappeared. The student, Ahmad Batebi, was himself a prisoner temporarily out of jail on a 15-day medical leave.

Batebi, who briefly became internationally famous when he was photographed holding up a bloody shirt during mass student protests in 1999, gave the UN official a list of some 50 names. He described the list in an interview with Radio Farda correspondent Farin Assemi immediately after meeting Ligabo at a gathering for the families of political detainees.

"I have compiled and submitted a list of about 50 political prisoners in various prisons in Iran, as well as their personal identification and the crimes they are accused of," Assemi said.

He continued, "I tried, as far as my memory served, to describe instances of violations of human rights, of illegal pressure during the prefabrication of cases, of interrogations of prisoners at the time of prosecution -- which is customary -- and to describe those whose cases could be helped from a legal aspect, as well as the prisoners' appalling physical conditions and endless problems with health."

Shortly after presenting his list, Batebi vanished and has not been heard from since. His family appealed for days at the Tehran prosecutor's office to learn his whereabouts and was finally told that he had been re-arrested.

The re-arrest is the latest chapter in an ordeal for Batebi and his family that already has seen him spend almost five years behind bars since he was arrested at age 21 after taking part in the July 1999 protests. Those protests began when vigilante groups attacked students demonstrating near the university over the closure of a reformist newspaper. The attack sparked a week of nationwide unrest that was the worst in Iran since the 1979 Islamic Revolution and ended only after a massive crackdown by security forces and vigilante groups.

The charges against Batebi -- like those against many other political prisoners in Iran -- have never been made public and remain vague. After his detention in 1999, he was tried behind closed doors and initially sentenced to death. The sentence was later reduced to eight years of imprisonment.

Batebi himself has said that his troubles stem solely from being depicted in a photograph that became an iconic image of Iran's student movement for the Western media. He told RFE/RL last year, during another temporary parole from prison, how the picture was taken.

"There was unrest outside the university, and we took the wounded [students] inside the campus. Bullets were shot, we ducked, one passed me and hit the person opposite me. I tried to cover his wound with a shirt, but it was not possible [to stop the bleeding]," Batebi said.

He continues: "When the students saw this scene, they got excited and wanted to go outside and start street demonstrations, so to stop them I held the shirt up. At that moment, Jamshid Bayrami, a journalist, took my picture and that was their excuse for arresting me. I wanted to warn the students that there was a massacre outside and this could cost us our lives."

As Batebi again disappears into prison, international human rights monitors are expressing concern over the treatment he may face.

Amnesty International in London said in a statement released this week that "judicial authorities in Iran must ensure that those who raise human rights concerns with either domestic or international bodies are not harassed or threatened with arrest."

A spokesperson for Amnesty International, Drewery Dyke, told RFE/RL that the organization has long watched Batebi's case because it points to a pattern in Iran of incarcerating people on vague charges that ignores normal legal practices and violates basic human rights.

"What is of concern in particular is the secret nature of that trial and the ongoing incarceration without a clear sense of what it is based on. [Amnesty International] has certainly raised concerns in the past about the use of very vague provisions in the law relating to national security that seem to compromise, that seem to encroach, on freedom of association," Dyke said.

Iran's judiciary has not responded to repeated expressions of international concern over Batebi and other political detainees in the country. But one hard-line newspaper -- voicing a view that may be shared by many in the judicial branch -- recently challenged the right of any Iranian to speak out about human rights abuses.

An article in the daily "Kayhan" last week questioned the patriotism of anyone who seeks help from international bodies. The paper wrote: "Suppose that someone at home feels something unfair has been done to him? Would it be reasonable to bring the complaint to the enemy?"

http://www.rferl.org/nca/features/2003/11/21112003172716.asp
22 posted on 11/21/2003 2:13:10 PM PST by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Canadian-Drafted Iran Rights Rebuke Approved by UN Panel

November 21, 2003
Reuters
Evelyn Leopold

A key U.N. committee approved a Canadian-drafted resolution rebuking Iran for alleged human rights abuses, including torture, suppression of free speech and discrimination against women and minorities.

The vote in the General Assembly's human rights panel was 73 in favor, 49 against and 50 abstentions. Most European and Latin American nations as well as the United States supported Canada, while Islamic countries voted against the measure as did Russia, China and India.

Adoption by the panel, which includes all U.N. members, is a virtual guarantee of passage by the full General Assembly.

The Geneva-based U.N. Commission on Human Rights adopted annual resolutions on Iran's rights record from 1984 to 2001 and the assembly followed suit. But last year the draft was narrowly defeated in Geneva and not revived by the assembly.

Specifically, the Canadian resolution calls on Iran, dominated by Shi'ite Muslims, to eliminate religious discrimination against minorities, including Bahais, Christians, Jews and Sunni Muslims.

It expresses concern at continuing public executions, the use of torture and amputation, arbitrary sentencing of political dissidents, suppression of press freedom and systematic discrimination against women and girls "in law and in practice."

Photojournalist Zahra Kazemi, a Canadian citizen of Iranian descent, died in custody in Iran in June, from a blow to the head, seriously damaging relations between Ottawa and Tehran.

The Canadian draft did not refer to her but singled out crackdowns by the judiciary and security forces against journalists, parliamentarians, students, clerics and academics. It expressed "serious concern" at the "harsh reactions to student demonstrations" such as imprisonment and mistreatment.

But Canadian envoy Gilbert Laurin mentioned her in his address to the panel on Thursday, saying, "What the Kazemi case did was to highlight for the Canadian people the situation of journalists in Iran and the absence of freedom of expression."

Scores of student activists, estimated at 4,000, were jailed during the 10-day pro-democracy protests in June. Only a number of students were released after the supreme religious leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei called on the judiciary to exercise leniency.

Iran's powerful Guardian Council, which reviews all legislation to see it accords with Islamic Sharia law, has countered many reforms attempted by President Mohammad Khatami.

Co-sponsors of the draft resolution with Canada were the United States, the Czech Republic, Iceland, Ireland, the Netherlands, Portugal, Sweden, Andorra and Micronesia.

http://www.reuters.com/locales/newsArticle.jsp?type=topNews&locale=en_CA&storyID=3873323
23 posted on 11/21/2003 2:13:59 PM PST by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Iran gets go-ahead for snap UN nuke inspections

Fri 21 November, 2003 11:29

VIENNA (Reuters) - The governing board of the United Nations nuclear watchdog has formally approved Iran's intention to sign a protocol giving the U.N. body the right to conduct more intrusive, snap nuclear inspections.

Asked if the board had approved Iran's intention to sign the protocol, Iran's ambassador to the U.N. in Vienna told Reuters: "Yes".

This means Tehran can sign the document immediately, though it will not formally enter into force until the Iranian parliament ratifies it.

http://www.reuters.co.uk/newsPackageArticle.jhtml?type=worldNews&storyID=407206&section=news
24 posted on 11/21/2003 2:25:55 PM PST by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
UN panel approves rebuke to Iran on human rights

By Evelyn Leopold
21 Nov 2003 19:30:46 GMT

UNITED NATIONS, Nov 21 (Reuters) - A key U.N. committee approved a Canadian-drafted resolution rebuking Iran for alleged human rights abuses, including torture, suppression of free speech and discrimination against women and minorities.

The vote in the General Assembly's human rights panel was 73 in favor, 49 against and 50 abstentions. Most European and Latin American nations as well as the United States supported Canada, while Islamic countries voted against the measure as did Russia, China and India.

Adoption by the panel, which includes all U.N. members, is a virtual guarantee of passage by the full General Assembly.

The Geneva-based U.N. Commission on Human Rights adopted annual resolutions on Iran's rights record from 1984 to 2001 and the assembly followed suit. But last year the draft was narrowly defeated in Geneva and not revived by the assembly.

Specifically, the Canadian resolution calls on Iran, dominated by Shi'ite Muslims, to eliminate religious discrimination against minorities, including Bahais, Christians, Jews and Sunni Muslims.

It expresses concern at continuing public executions, the use of torture and amputation, arbitrary sentencing of political dissidents, suppression of press freedom and systematic discrimination against women and girls "in law and in practice."

Photojournalist Zahra Kazemi, a Canadian citizen of Iranian descent, died in custody in Iran in June, from a blow to the head, seriously damaging relations between Ottawa and Tehran.

The Canadian draft did not refer to her but singled out crackdowns by the judiciary and security forces against journalists, parliamentarians, students, clerics and academics. It expressed "serious concern" at the "harsh reactions to student demonstrations" such as imprisonment and mistreatment.

But Canadian envoy Gilbert Laurin mentioned her in his address to the panel on Thursday, saying, "What the Kazemi case did was to highlight for the Canadian people the situation of journalists in Iran and the absence of freedom of expression."

Scores of student activists, estimated at 4,000, were jailed during the 10-day pro-democracy protests in June. Only a number of students were released after the supreme religious leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei called on the judiciary to exercise leniency.

Iran's powerful Guardian Council, which reviews all legislation to see it accords with Islamic Sharia law, has countered many reforms attempted by President Mohammad Khatami.

Co-sponsors of the draft resolution with Canada were the United States, the Czech Republic, Iceland, Ireland, the Netherlands, Portugal, Sweden, Andorra and Micronesia.

http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/N21246806.htm
25 posted on 11/21/2003 2:28:09 PM PST by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
THE GREAT DIVIDE

By AMIR TAHERI
NY Post
November 21, 2003

LONDON -- IT may be too early to know how President Bush's state visit to London, the first ever by a U.S. president, will play back in Peoria. But it seems that part of the American media, focusing on sporadic anti-American demonstrations in London, has decided to present it as a symbol of "global anger against the United States."
What has happened here in the past few days, however, is more complex. To be sure, London has witnessed a series of demonstrations in the past week or so. None, however, attracted more than a few hundred people, although the "final bouquet," fired at Trafalgar Square yesterday, brought together some 100,000 people according to the organizers.

Nevertheless, these demonstrations have been used as the basis for a variety of strange claims and arguments.

One claim is that the United States is now "extremely unpopular" even in Britain, its oldest and most steadfast ally. That, however, is not what the latest polls show.

One poll, conducted for the liberal-left daily The Guardian on the eve of Bush's visit, reveals a different picture. It shows that 62 percent of Brits regard the United States as "generally speaking a force for good, not evil, in the world." Only 15 percent agree with the suggestion that it is an "evil empire."

The same poll shows that opposition to the War on Terror has fallen by 12 percent since September. Today a majority of British voters, 51 percent, believe that the war is justified.

Even the claim that Bush is "hated by a majority of the Brits" is proved false. The American leader is welcomed by 43 percent of those polled, as opposed to 36 percent who say they'd rather he had stayed home.

The poll's results are backed by direct observation and anecdotal evidence. Anyone who toured the streets of London around Buckingham Palace, where the president and first lady were staying, could easily see that the anti-Americans were not the only ones in evidence.

As for the British media, the Bush visit reflected the traditional left-right divides. The centrist and right-leaning papers welcomed Bush and ran editorials and columns endorsing the aims of the war on terrorism. The left-leaning papers used the visit as a fresh occasion to denounce intervention in Afghanistan and Iraq.

But even then the left-leaning segments of the British media manifested some unease. There are two reasons for this.

First, the recent anti-American demonstrations represent a bizarre alliance between the remnants of Marxist-Leninist and militant Islamist groups. Many soft-left Brits are still uncomfortable with the idea of an alliance with reactionary Islamists who oppress women, massacre religious and other minorities and bring God into the people's bedrooms.

The second reason for unease on the part of the soft-left is that it is hard to build a case for the return of the Taliban and Saddam Hussein to power. The playwright Harold Pinter, still bitter about the demise of the Taliban and Saddam Hussein, has described Bush and Blair as " two war criminals" who "drink blood" at their tea party. But how many are likely to take him seriously? The placards claiming that Bush and Blair are "burning babies in Baghdad" are unlikely to do any better.

The demonstrations are thus unlikely to have a lasting impact on Anglo-American relations. Once the dust has settled, Bush's visit may well be remembered for two things only.

The first is Bush's speech at Whitehall, in which he repeated his earlier linkage between U.S. national security and the spread of democracy in the Middle East with greater clarity.

It is interesting that much of the British media decided to treat it as nothing more than a clever speech to impress an audience of foreign-policy buffs. And yet the idea that the democratic nations cannot be safe for as long as there are tyrannies that sponsor and shelter terrorism is beginning to attract the attention of the average British voter.

The slogan "war against terrorism" told only half the story. Bush's idea of putting the spread of democracy at the top of the agenda tells the other half. Now the average Briton knows that he is not asked to fight only against something, but also for something.

This is a position that the traditional anti-American forces of the totalitarian left, and their new Islamist allies, will find increasingly hard to challenge.

The second thing that the Bush visit is likely to be remembered for is that it helped draw a clear distinction between two visions of the world.

One vision belongs to those who blame the Western democracies for all the ills of mankind and hate the United States for a variety of reasons. These are people who never protested when Saddam was filling all those mass graves in Iraq or when the Taliban were massacring the Hazara in Bamiyan. You will never see them demanding the release of political prisoners in Cuba itself, but find them crying their hearts out for the al Qaeda operatives held in Guantanamo Bay.

Another vision is defended by those who believe that fighting against tyranny and terror is the fundamental political duty of all human beings, and that the most noble principles are ultimately meaningless unless defended by force if and when necessary.

The Marxist-Islamist alliance may well have done all of us a service this week in London. It has put the fight between open societies and their enemies into focus.

E-mail: amirtaheri@benadorassociates.com

http://www.nypost.com/postopinion/opedcolumnists/11381.htm
26 posted on 11/21/2003 2:31:15 PM PST by DoctorZIn
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To: All
Report: Mullahs Hiding bin Laden

November 21, 2003
WorldNetDaily
WorldNetDaily.com

Citing an "unimpeachable source," Osama bin Laden and his al-Qaida deputy Ayman al-Zawahiri are in Iran, according to a Fox News analyst. Al-Zawahiri was seen within the last two weeks, and bin Laden was spotted in July, says the network's foreign affairs analyst Mansoor Ijaz.

The report dovetails with Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf's announcement last summer that he had sent his own army into the northern tribal areas near the border with Iran to ferret out bin Laden.

"That was an extraordinary admission at the time, one that I could not understand how he could make if bin Laden, in fact, was still in that area," Ijaz told Fox News host Brit Hume. "Well, it turns out that it was around that time that bin Laden moved from the Afghan-Pakistani border into Iran."

Al-Zawahiri has been seen recently in Iran planning and plotting various terrorist attacks against U.S. interests and other countries, he said.

Both al-Qaida leaders are disguised. Bin Laden, Ijaz has been told, shaved his head bald and is wearing a shorter beard that is dyed to make him look more like an Iranian cleric. He also has put on a considerable amount of weight.

Al-Zawahiri has done something similar, Ijaz said, and is now wearing a black turban and dyed beard instead of the traditional white turban he wore as an Egyptian cleric.

Bin Laden is being kept out of the public while al-Zawahiri is said to be moving around quite freely, Ijaz said.

The analyst said the Revolutionary Guard of Iran has arranged for at least three to four body doubles that are making their way around different parts of Afghanistan to fool bin Laden's pursuers.

"But I can tell you with unimpeachability tonight that he is on the western border of Iran, inside Iran, planning terrorist attacks against the United States' interests in that part of the world," Ijaz said.

He explained that Iran's provision of safe harbor, finances and logistical support for al-Qaida is a measure to counter the possibility that U.S. action in that region could result in democracies on both sides of the country, in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Ijaz said an Afghan warlord who controls Afghanistan's western provinces is working with al-Qaida on a plan to bring a large army of Iranian Revolutionary Guard troops into Afghanistan during the winter months to attack U.S. interests and to try to take control of the entire country.

"Iran does not want to see us succeed in building a democracy in Afghanistan under any circumstances," he said.

In short, according to Ijaz, Iranian technology is now being used to help the Afghan warlords to take over the country from Hamid Karzai," the Afghan president.

Ijaz said it is likely certain segments of the U.S. government have the information on bin Laden and are analyzing and processing it.

"But it was my judgment, he said, "that it was vitally important for the broader part of our government's decision-making apparatus to know exactly what it is that's going on there, because it's very clear that the Iranians are trying desperately to not only hang on to power, but to fuel the terrorist enterprise in that part of the world."

http://www.wnd.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=35759
27 posted on 11/21/2003 2:43:32 PM PST by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Report: Mullahs Hiding bin Laden

November 21, 2003
WorldNetDaily
WorldNetDaily.com

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1026223/posts?page=27#27
28 posted on 11/21/2003 2:44:15 PM PST by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Get them mullahs!!
29 posted on 11/21/2003 2:46:24 PM PST by Pro-Bush (Homeland Security + Tom Ridge = Open Borders --> Demand Change!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Iranian Vows To Find Those Who Ordered Her Parents Killed

November 21, 2003
The Associated Press
Dow Jones Newswires

TEHRAN --The daughter of a Tehran couple murdered by Iranian Intelligence Ministry agents has vowed not to abandon her quest to find who ordered the killing of her parents, the leaders of a minor opposition party.

"I won't give up until the whole truth is uncovered, and justice is done to the people who ordered that my parents be murdered," Parastou Forouhar told The Associated Press on Friday, the eve of the fifth anniversary of the murders.

Dariush and Parvaneh Forouhar were stabbed to death in their home in central Tehran on Nov. 22, 1998. In the following weeks, two writers opposed to the government were kidnapped and murdered.

In January 2001, a court convicted three former Intelligence Ministry agents of the murders and condemned them to death. Five other people were sentenced to life imprisonment for lesser roles in the murders.

The Intelligence Ministry admitted its officials were involved in the four murders, but claimed they were "rogue" agents. However, many Iranian intellectuals and reformist politicians believe the agents didn't act on their own initiatives, and accuse the government of failing to get to the bottom of the affair.

The murders remain a sensitive issue. The government refused to allow Forouhar to hold a memorial ceremony on Friday, saying she should hold it on Sunday.

At Ershad Mosque in north Tehran, where the ceremony had been scheduled, security agents patrolled outside Friday and quietly asked people to leave. A banner said the ceremony had been postponed to Sunday.

"The officials told me that police could not guarantee the security of the participants on Friday," Forouhar told the AP.

At last year's memorial service, hard-line vigilantes attacked the participants, wounding several of them.

A relative of Forouhar said the authorities wanted the memorial ceremony postponed to a working day because they feared a huge turnout. Friday is the sabbath in Islamic Iran.

The relative, who spoke on condition of anonymity, was one of 400 friends and supporters of Forouhar who attended a dinner to break the Ramadan fast on Friday night at the house where her parents were murdered. Candlelit photos of her parents decorated the house.

Forouhar said that in 2000 she filed a complaint to the parliamentary committee that is charged with looking into complaints from members of the public. She said the committee, which operates under Article 90 of the constitution, probed the killings but told her last week they had ceased their investigation because they had run into senior people whom they had no power to deal with.

The committee chairman, Hossein Ansari, confirmed this. He told the AP on Friday: "We reached the names of persons we had no power to prosecute. That's why the case remains unfinished."

Ansari refused to give any names, but the investigative journalist Akbar Ganji accused former Intelligence Minister Ali Fallahian of responsibility for the murders. Fallahian denied any involvement.

Ganji, an opposition supporter, made the allegation while testifying at his trial. He is now serving a prison sentence for undermining national security.

"I have no trust in the Iranian judiciary and I asked the U.N. human rights organization to probe the killings," Forouhar said.

She said the U.N. Human Rights Committee told her this year that it had written to the Iranian government asking for answers to various questions.

"The committee is waiting for the Iranian government's response," she said.

http://iranvajahan.net/cgi-bin/news.pl?l=en&y=2003&m=11&d=21&a=11
30 posted on 11/21/2003 2:55:13 PM PST by DoctorZIn
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To: webvanca
ping to 28
31 posted on 11/21/2003 3:03:40 PM PST by Pan_Yans Wife ("Your joy is your sorrow unmasked." --- GIBRAN)
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To: DoctorZIn; F14 Pilot; downer911; seamole
So if the Revolutionary Guard are caught in the act aiding and abetting, (and they wouldn't do this without the regime's orders) will this finally be enough to convince the rest of the world that it's time to kick Khamenei, Khatami and the rest of the Klan out of Iran?
32 posted on 11/21/2003 3:45:25 PM PST by nuconvert
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Comment #33 Removed by Moderator

To: DoctorZIn; F14 Pilot; Grampa Dave
Today, there are an estimated 30,000 political prisoners in Iran.

But Hitlery and Schumer weep for the detained terrorists at Gitmo.

34 posted on 11/21/2003 4:16:42 PM PST by PhilDragoo (Hitlery: das Butch von Buchenvald)
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To: DoctorZIn
IRANIANS COMMEMORATED THE ANNIVERSARY OF THE SERIAL MURDERS

TEHRAN 21 Nov. (IPS)
Parastoo Foroohar, the daughter of Dariush and Parvaneh, slain leaders of the Iranian People Party confirmed that the case of the murder of her parents as well as several other intellectuals and human rights activists is still pending, with the authorities no willing to identify the real culprits.

High-ranking agents of the Intelligence Ministry had savagely assassinated the Foroohars at their modest residence in Tehran at the end of November 1998, followed by Mohammad Mokhtari, Mohammad Ja’far Pooyandeh, Majid Sharif and Pirooz Davani.

Though most Iranians are certain that the assassinations, better known as the "serial murders" were instructed by senior clerics, but so far, no one, except two junior employees at the Intelligence Ministry have been identified.

Mr. Sa’id Emami, a deputy Intelligence Minister designated by the authorities as the mastermind of the killings committed suicide in prison, but two of his close associates were freed latter on.

"Despite all out efforts to have the authorities follow the case, but so far, we have received no answer and the Article 90 Committee of the Majles that is following the case has said that it had reached the point that it could go no further", Ms Foroohar told reporters on the eve of the fifth commemoration of the murders.

Sources in Tehran said that despite strong recommendations by the Police to keep the ceremonies very low profile, yet hundreds of Iranians, most of them young ones, turned up at the mosque, chanting nationalist songs and carrying the traditional Iranian flag.

On the orders from the Police, the ceremonies had been differed to the afternoon in order to not coincide with the so-called "international Qods (Jerusalem)" rally, a manifestation the Islamic Republic organises at the last Friday of the fasting month of Ramazan to demonstrate solidarity with the Palestinian people.

In a statement made earlier, Hojjatoleslam Hoseyn Ansari Raad, the Chairman of the Article 90 that deal with legal, judiciary and human rights issues had confirmed that his inquiries concerning the serial murders have reached people "we have no power to deal with them", an indirect but blunt confirmation of the suspicions that the orders for the physical elimination of the dissidents were issued by some high-ranking clerics.

"This is exactly the point we also have reached: a wall it is difficult to cross", the 45 years-old Parastoo said, adding that the questions she and her lawyers have raised with the Judiciary concerning the assassination of her parents have not been heard by the authorities.

"After five years of the files going two and fro between the different justice departments, there is no chance of a satisfactory outcome. Now we are sure that Iranian justice refuses to investigate this case and refuses to punish the murderers and those behind the murder", Ms Foroohar told Radio Farda, the Persian service of Radio Free Europe-Radio Liberty.

Mr. Ansari Raad warned on Thursday that if the thought that led to the serial murders in the one hand and the approach of the officials to the case are not uprooted, then one has unfortunately expect more killings of the same pattern.

"The authorities, instead of identifying and arresting the real culprits have unleashed against the dissidents", the IPP said in a statement issued on the fifth anniversary of the serial murders of journalists and intellectuals, adding that the Party would continue "its quest for justice".

For its part, the Paris-based international press watchdog Reporters Sans Frontieres (Reporters Without Borders) called on the Iranian authorities to break "the impunity enjoyed by murderers and especially those who instigated killings".

"There is never any discussion about who were the masterminds behind the killings", the Reporters Sans Frontieres observed

All the families of victims have complained that the question of who instigated the killings has never been raised. Since November 2002, they have been making complaints to international justice organisations. Reporters Without Borders supports these families and hopes that the international bodies will do everything within their power to see that justice is done.

ENDS FOROOHARS COMMEMORATION 211103

http://www.iran-press-service.com/articles_2003/Nov-2003/foroohars_commemoration_211103.htm
35 posted on 11/21/2003 5:25:48 PM PST by DoctorZIn
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To: PhilDragoo; DoctorZIn; AdmSmith; Persia; RaceBannon; nuconvert; onyx; freedom44; Pan_Yans Wife; ...
Belarus sells weapons to Iran: Minsk officials

Friday, November 21, 2003
IranMania News

MINSK, Nov 20 (AFP) - The isolated former Soviet republic of Belarus said Thursday that its arms sales in recent years mainly went to four countries including Iran and Sudan.

Minsk has exported tanks, armoured personnel carriers and heavy artillery to Tehran, Khartoum, the Ivory Coast and Algeria, said Vasily Pavlov, top arms export control official at the foreign ministry.

However, he denied any Belarussian military exports to Iraq under ousted president Saddam Hussein.

Washington has accused the authoritarian regime of President Alexander Lukashenko of selling military communication equipment to Iraq in violation of the UN embargo before the US-led invasion in March.

Pavlov presented a report on Belarussian arms sales in 2002 and 2003 to reporters.

"Belarus is the first country of the CIS (grouping of former Soviet republics) to have published such a document, which shows our country's wish to increase transparency in military sales," he said.

http://www.iranmania.com/News/ArticleView/Default.asp?NewsCode=19892&NewsKind=Current%20Affairs
36 posted on 11/21/2003 10:08:15 PM PST by F14 Pilot
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To: DoctorZIn
This thread is now closed.

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37 posted on 11/22/2003 12:11:07 AM PST by DoctorZIn
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To: F14 Pilot
Freedom ~ Now!
38 posted on 11/22/2003 7:47:05 AM PST by blackie
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