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To: Bikers4Bush
To be fair, we are all dying. There is no cure for old age. Eventually we will all die.

Handle this case by case and hope for the best. If he has an unusually short lifespan expected, then it may be wise to pass him up for the organ transplant.

It's not unusual for AIDS patients to live for long periods of time - advances in drugs and treatment make living a more full life more realistic.
4 posted on 11/21/2003 12:52:03 PM PST by HitmanLV (I will not be pushed, filed, stamped, indexed, briefed, debriefed or numbered. My life is my own.)
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To: HitmanNY
You're right we are all dying, but we all haven't fast tracked ourselves in that process by engaging in risky behaviors.

He either caught AIDS and Hep C by sharing needles or through his sexual practices. Had he caught it through a blood transfusion you can bet they'd have mentioned it. Either way neither of those diseases is curable and both are ultimately fatal.

There's an organ shortage as it is in this country, there's no point in putting the few that are available into people with terminable diseases that replacing an organ won't fix.

9 posted on 11/21/2003 12:59:38 PM PST by Bikers4Bush
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To: HitmanNY
It boils down to who is the most likely to benefit (quality of life, etc.) from the transplant.

It would be a tough decision; AIDS/HIV or not.

How often do Hepatitis patients get liver transplants? Are they low priority?

12 posted on 11/21/2003 1:06:38 PM PST by dhs12345
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