Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

M-16 Rifle May Be on Way Out of U.S. Army
AP, Yahoo! ^ | 11-22-03 | Slobodan Lekic

Posted on 11/22/2003 1:50:36 PM PST by Ex-Dem

click here to read article


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-5051-100101-150151-175 last
To: jonascord
"The Ruger Ranch rifle, while it employs a Garand style gas system, (more like a shrunk M-14 type, with a gas-driven piston hitting the end of the operating rod, which cams the bolt out of lock.) is chambered for the 5.56mm NATO."

Not quite. The Ruger Ranch Rifle (a Mini-14) fires the .223 Remington round, which is the same caliber as the 5.56 mm NATO round used in M-16s, but the .223 has a slightly less-powerful cartridge. I'd not want to use 5.56 mm NATO rounds in my Ruger Ranch, and in fact Ruger strongly recommends against it.
151 posted on 11/24/2003 5:15:26 AM PST by ought-six
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 80 | View Replies]

To: F14 Pilot
Thanks for the ping
152 posted on 11/24/2003 10:26:13 AM PST by nuconvert
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 150 | View Replies]

To: Iron-sight Sniper
personal friend, a gunsmith. welcome to FreeRepublic.
153 posted on 11/24/2003 6:11:36 PM PST by gdc61
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 134 | View Replies]

To: Iron-sight Sniper
personal friend, a gunsmith. I've seen tins for $60 in the Traders Guide as well. also, welcome to FreeRepublic.
154 posted on 11/24/2003 6:14:21 PM PST by gdc61
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 134 | View Replies]

To: El Gato; All
I am chagrined to have made such errors of fact as I see on re-reading my posts. Some of them I had doubts about at the time, others errors are purely of memory. I'll have to buy a few modern references, I think.

Sorry.
155 posted on 11/25/2003 1:20:27 AM PST by Iris7 ( "Duty, Honor, Country". The first of these is Duty, and is known only through His Grace.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 126 | View Replies]

To: Iris7
I am chagrined to have made such errors of fact as I see on re-reading my posts. Some of them I had doubts about at the time, others errors are purely of memory. I'll have to buy a few modern references, I think.

That's what Google is for, however you have to do some cross checking and get a feel for which site are reputable and which are not.

Nothing to be sorry about, chagrin is more appropriate, just learn from your mistakes and press on.

156 posted on 11/25/2003 10:01:53 AM PST by El Gato (Federal Judges can twist the Constitution into anything.. Or so they think.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 155 | View Replies]

To: Billthedrill
The carbine gas port is located closer to the chamber than the gas port of the M4: 7.5 inches instead of the 13 inch distance on the M16. The gas pulse therefore enters the gas tube sooner and reaches the carrier group earlier than it does in the M16 length barrel. In addition to reaching the carrier sooner, it reaches it at higher pressure. The gas pressure at the carbine’s gas port is double that of the M16: 26,000 psi vs. 13,000 pounds per square inch.

157 posted on 12/13/2003 5:55:56 AM PST by cpl tank
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Billthedrill
The carbine gas port is located closer to the chamber than the gas port of the M16: 7.5 inches instead of the 13 inch distance on the M16. The gas pulse therefore enters the gas tube sooner and reaches the carrier group earlier than it does in the M16 length barrel. In addition to reaching the carrier sooner, it reaches it at higher pressure. The gas pressure at the carbine’s gas port is double that of the M16: 26,000 psi vs. 13,000 pounds per square inch.

158 posted on 12/13/2003 6:29:06 AM PST by cpl tank
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Billthedrill
mybad

159 posted on 12/13/2003 6:29:29 AM PST by cpl tank
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: cpl tank
Holy crap! No wonder there are problems. Many thanks for digging that information up for me, I wasn't having much luck and my Army contacts are out of town at the moment...way, way out of town...
160 posted on 12/13/2003 2:40:16 PM PST by Billthedrill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 158 | View Replies]

To: Renfield
I am the author of competitionshooting.com and a contributor to the 6.5 Grendel project.

As a testament to the capability of the cartridge, Dr. Lou Palmisano, the inventor of the original PPC cartridge and one of the foremost experts in the world on ballistics and shooting has expressed his enthusiasm and support for the work accomplished and the application of the cartridge in the AR15 platform. It has been a great honor to gain the support and input of a legend in the world of shooting such as Dr. Palmisano.

The 6.5 Grendel comes to market on February 12, 2004 at the SHOT show in Las Vegas. Orders will be accepted shortly thereafter.

Anyone having questions about the 6.5 Grendel, can email me through competitionshooting.com.

TX65

161 posted on 12/13/2003 5:59:06 PM PST by tx65
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 140 | View Replies]

Comment #162 Removed by Moderator

To: Renfield
"... Even with designs like the French FAMAS and Austrian AUG, that are convertible from right-hand to left-hand action, this conversion takes 5 or 10 minutes...not something one can do in the heat of battle..."

The FAMAS has an ejection port cover that can be switched to deflect fired cases in either direction in a few seconds. You just turn it around 180 degrees.

163 posted on 12/13/2003 6:17:24 PM PST by The KG9 Kid (Semper Fi)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 147 | View Replies]

To: Renfield
In reference to the 6.5 Grendel, the cartridge is based on the PPC family of cartridges with a case length of 1.505 inches. Operating within a magazine length loading restriction of 2.255 inches, the cartridge can be loaded with a wide range of bullets from 80 to 144 grains.

As far as military consideration of the cartridge, various elements of the military have seen test rifles demonstrated out to 1,000 yards over the past 6 months. It would be fair to say that they have been impressed with the demonstrations. However, it will be 2004 before production rifles and ammunition are able to be presented to the military for formal evaluation, consideration and application for their mission uses. Therefore, it would be premature for any party to form any conclusions as to a military role for the 6.5 Grendel.

For civilian use, the rifle has excellent capabilities for competition (highpower and benchrest), hunting (deer, antelope, wild hogs, sheep) as well as people who just want a highly accurate cartridge for casual target shooting. In addition, the cartridge has outstanding properties for law enforcement use.
164 posted on 12/14/2003 8:29:42 AM PST by tx65
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: tx65
if anyone would like a ballistic comparison chart on the 6.5 Grendel comparing it to the 5.56 NATO, 7.62 NATO and 6.8 Rem SPC, email akb@competitionshooting.com.
165 posted on 02/25/2004 2:12:56 PM PST by tx65
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 164 | View Replies]

To: Eaker
This is great!

You're in procurement, order us up a few dozen of the used ones.
We need to do our part to keep our Military up to date and get these
obsolete weapons out of circulation as quick as we can. I'll FReepmail you my FEDEX account number.

166 posted on 02/25/2004 2:17:28 PM PST by humblegunner
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: archy
I don't think you know what you are talking about.... The L85A1 & A2 SA80 have an effective range of 2m or as far as you can be bothered to throw them.

1) The stirling smg has been decommisioned, and to my knolage sold to thirdworld countries or put to scrap.. I don't belive any have been retained for war stock, however some deactivated ones are kept within some regimental, or corp museums as displays.

The stirling it'self i belive was desinged by an WWII SF officer, and is an more sturdy, and more reliable of the massproduced sten gun...

2) The british bulpup you are refering to is the Enfield L85 A1 & A2 (Indervidual Weapon) often refered to as the SA80... With the LMG version being the Enfield L85 (Light Support Weapon). The L86 is the designation set asside for the cocking cadet GP, which is only used for cadets or shooting tournimants... This weapon dose not contain any gas parts so soe not permit Semi-Auto Or Auto Fireing.

3) Yes the SA80 can take M16 mags, and are used to replace the flimsy pressed meatal mags... These have been replaced ith more bulkey stel mags, as the magerzines if knocked, do not fit properly in the magerzine housing or can NOT be secured by the magerzine catch.... {So i have often had to take an pair of pliers or an hammer to magerzines to hammer out defects to get them to work.... The last thing i wan't is to lightly put in an magazine let go and watch it drop to the floor while some rag head puts some well earned lead into my skull.

4) You'd be better off with an aug, than an SA80.... For an number of reasons... while i can't comment too much on the A2 version, as my unit is not an frount line infantry unit therefore we have not been issued with the upgraded weapon, yet... Due to the fact tthat wqe were reprioritised, due to reacent milatry conflicts taken part accross the globe, so we are stuck with our A1's with smoth bores, and broken parts....

The main problems with the SA80 IW & LSW are the following:

+ The Butstock often cracks due to poor manufacture.

+ The access cover to the gasparts is dificult to open {As an upgrade taken to the origonal weapon}, therefore get access to in an emergancey.

+ The magerzine catch is too stiff, due to another upgrade taken. {Meaning increased load times.

+ The magerzines are too flimsy and get eaaly dented making them useless. Replaced with steel ones for A2.

+ The magerzine housing is too weak, to withstand high pressure when changing magerzines. Belive strengthened for the A2.

+ The extractor, is not reliable, so you often end up with stuck rounds fouling the bolt mechinisum, and the outer casing... {Frequent occourance}... Replaced for the A2.

+ The locking pins are week and sometimes fall out all together, when they become ditatched from the Trigger Mechinisum Housing. Allthough they are not suposed to.. Sticks make good replacements though :). If forced too hard you can dammage the steel housing making the gun unusable. So it will have to be returned for refit, or scrapped.

+ The barrel of both the LSW and the IW overheat after 150 rounds aprox... and rounds jam soon after that, which is why there is an barrel replacemnt for LSW only as part ofthe A2 upgrade.

+ The cocking handle is hard to access to cock the weapon, so it has been modified for the A2.

+ The Bolt rleace catch is weak, and becomes loose or drops off from time to time, orkward at the best of times.

+ The issue bayonet is weak, and often snaps off in victims, reducing the future combat efficancy of the soldier...

+ The holes above the barrel, often get mud sand etc, in and are hard to clean... And the Reciver often becomes cloged with debrey or sand...

+ The dustcover is weak and often drops off altogether.

+ The safty catch is unrelyable, and can be bypassed if you press fimly enougth on the trigger. It also makes too much noise when you change from Safe to Ready.... This will give you away in an ambush situation.

5) Why not use the dust cover when the weapon is cocked. Is because the weapon once fired can and dose catch on the dustcover and jams or brakes the dustcover alltogether, belive me iv'e done it myself so i don't put the dustcover once loaded.... Not sure if fixed for the A2, as this would increase reliablity in deasrt conditions.

6) The only good thing about the SA80 is the SUSAT {Sight Unit Small Arms Trilux} sight it has an 4x magnification, can be set to ranges upto 800m. It also has an radioactive lighting elimet that iluminates the slight eliment, for low light or night combat. It also has inbuilt iron battle/emergancy sight ontop, and this can be used insted of the sight depending on personal prefrance, however is less accurate then the other iron sights provided. The SUSAT however is given mainly to frontline, Infantry or marksmanship weapons, however all most all of the weapons in my rgt have SUSATS, unless they have been dammaged or sent to someone else, who needs them more than we do. The susat makes an soldier an effective marksman and efficant at hitting targets individualy at 300m or as an section at 400m where as the LSW is individualy caperble of hitting targets at 600m and is increased by the A2 modifications to 800m.
167 posted on 04/24/2004 7:50:49 PM PDT by british-soldier (British eapon.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 109 | View Replies]

To: FreedomPoster
So the M16 is too long and bulky, so we're going to use M4s for a while, and then switch to something that's nearly as long as, and bulkier than, an M16. Riiiight.

Enough of the "one size fits all" mentality

In WW-II, we had the M1-garand for open (European) environments and the M1-carbine for jungle fighting in the Pacific, plus all sorts of special weapons (tommy guns, BARs). Things worked out

Let's just standardize on a full-size battle rifle (7.62 NATO, or maybe .270) with nice optics and backup iron sights, plus something modelled on the MP5 for close-quarter urban environments and to give to vehicle drivers. Plus a nice .45

Let's also kill some multi-billion-$$$ pork program and use the money for training ammo. I'd like to see ALL military get at least an hour of range time every week

168 posted on 04/24/2004 8:16:38 PM PDT by SauronOfMordor (That which does not kill me had better be able to run away damn fast.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: F14 Pilot
You might like this:


169 posted on 04/24/2004 8:19:59 PM PDT by Howlin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 150 | View Replies]

To: ExSoldier
Funny thing is that in a little over a year in theater I've not heard any direct criticism of the M-16 or variants by those who actually use them. I've read comments like this article which quotes unnamed sources for dislike of the weapon.

As for the Beretta, the biggest, and really only bitch is the magazines.

What I want is one of the pintle mounted M 82's! That combined with a SAW seem to be a pretty good combo for the HUMVEE TC.

Again, I'm not hearing any dissatisfaction with the weapons. But, hey, what would I know about what the troops think? lol...
170 posted on 04/24/2004 8:24:24 PM PDT by Eagle Eye (Coming to you live from HESCO city...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 89 | View Replies]

To: Ex-Dem
America should adapt Kalashnikov rifles to their army, that would solve all their jamming problems.
171 posted on 04/24/2004 8:26:42 PM PDT by Soviet
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: All
If they need a gun for use in close quarters combat, they should ship out some H&K UMP's in .45 caliber.


172 posted on 04/24/2004 8:33:57 PM PDT by COEXERJ145
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 171 | View Replies]

To: british-soldier
I don't think you know what you are talking about.... The L85A1 & A2 SA80 have an effective range of 2m or as far as you can be bothered to throw them.

Well, I've not carried the SA80 for really extended periods of time the way I have the M14 and M16A1- I had 4 M14s to pick and choose from when that was my daily tool, and used a few others as well. And from January 1968 to March 1970 I wore out four out of the five M16A1s or Car 15s that came my way...I wasn't using one every day, but almost always had one or an alternative around, and learned their strengths and weaknesses well. But I've carried SA80s daily for just short of a month, under circumstances in which the targets could shoot back.

1) The stirling smg has been decommisioned, and to my knolage sold to thirdworld countries or put to scrap.. I don't belive any have been retained for war stock, however some deactivated ones are kept within some regimental, or corp museums as displays.

The Brtish Army has indeed put their L2A3 Sterlings into War Reserve or museum, but the Nepalese Army still uses them daily, as does the Pakistani Armed Forces. I first made my introduction to the things in 1967 during an exchange toiur with the British Army of the Rhine, also now under new management. But quite a few of the Special Forces teams free to pick whatever they like have been using ex-Iraqi Sterlings, handy from the confines of a raider's gun HUMVEE, and from which the muzzle flash at night is a bit less obvious than thaty of an M4 carbine.

The stirling it'self i belive was desinged by an WWII SF officer, and is an more sturdy, and more reliable of the massproduced sten gun...

Just so; the Stirling works at Dagenham was also the producer of the Royal Navy's Lanchester Machine Carbine, a bit heavy, but still in use aboard some Royal Australian Navy vessels during the 1991 Iraqi war, just as some Marine Commandos favored the Lanc over the heavier Thompson or flimsier Sten...though many of the Sten's faults came from the magazine, which was also that of the Sterling, AKA the Patchett in its earliest days.

2) The british bulpup you are refering to is the Enfield L85 A1 & A2 (Indervidual Weapon) often refered to as the SA80... With the LMG version being the Enfield L85 (Light Support Weapon). The L86 is the designation set asside for the cocking cadet GP, which is only used for cadets or shooting tournimants... This weapon dose not contain any gas parts so soe not permit Semi-Auto Or Auto Fireing.

Well, no. The L85/A1/A2 is the Individual Weapon, the L86/A1/A2, the Light Support Weapon. The Cadet Rifle, which I've only dealt with once, is the L98A1 model. Not a bad little target shooter, and I'd dearly love to have one, but the one I fired didn't have the SUSAT fitted. I was told then [1998] that a semi-auto cadet rifle was in the works after H&K worked out the alterations that have now become the L85A2. We shall see.

3) Yes the SA80 can take M16 mags, and are used to replace the flimsy pressed meatal mags... These have been replaced ith more bulkey stel mags, as the magerzines if knocked, do not fit properly in the magerzine housing or can NOT be secured by the magerzine catch.... {So i have often had to take an pair of pliers or an hammer to magerzines to hammer out defects to get them to work.... The last thing i wan't is to lightly put in an magazine let go and watch it drop to the floor while some rag head puts some well earned lead into my skull.

Agreed. Note though that many of the surplussed British steel magazines have found their way to the U.S. where they're very prised as an improvement that works very nicely in the M16 and AR15 rifles hereabouts. The Canadians seem to have given up on their Thermold plastic magazines for their C7 and C8 M16 family rifles by Diemaco, so it remains to be seen what will be thought of as the best of the M16/SA80 magazine breed.

4) You'd be better off with an aug, than an SA80.... For an number of reasons... while i can't comment too much on the A2 version, as my unit is not an frount line infantry unit therefore we have not been issued with the upgraded weapon, yet... Due to the fact tthat wqe were reprioritised, due to reacent milatry conflicts taken part accross the globe, so we are stuck with our A1's with smoth bores, and broken parts....

I'm very familiar with the AUG, both as the Austrian Stg 77 version, and in the Australian F88 variant, another shooter with some teething problems. I came quite close to owning my own as a motorbike rifle, since the AUG would dismount the barrel for carry in the restricted space saddlebags. Note that those Australians who could [SAS] used American or Canadian M16s with M203 grenade launchers while in East Timor and Iraq/Afghanistan, wehile those with the F89 SAW were generally quite happy with their burden.

The main problems with the SA80 IW & LSW are the following:

+ The Butstock often cracks due to poor manufacture.

Observed.

+ The access cover to the gasparts is dificult to open {As an upgrade taken to the origonal weapon}, therefore get access to in an emergancey.

Concur. Not yet certain how that's been dealt with, if at all, with the L85A2- I've yet to have my hands on one.

+ The magerzine catch is too stiff, due to another upgrade taken. {Meaning increased load times.

Too light and the mag is on the ground, too stiff and it's as you note. Hopefully improved on the A2 versions- we shall see.

+ The magerzines are too flimsy and get eaaly dented making them useless. Replaced with steel ones for A2.

The steel ones are also the ducks guts for M16 rifles. Supposedly, the new H&K version magazines are even better. A large part of the difficulty is that magazine well meant to guide the original straight-profile 20-round magazines up the spout, which meant that the top of the 30-round version has to be straight in profile, with the bottom half curved. This is not likely the best possible arrangement....

+ The magerzine housing is too weak, to withstand high pressure when changing magerzines. Belive strengthened for the A2.

Listed as one of the H&K design fixes. Hopefully.

+ The extractor, is not reliable, so you often end up with stuck rounds fouling the bolt mechinisum, and the outer casing... {Frequent occourance}... Replaced for the A2.

Again, said to be one of the primary improvements of the newest version. If there's a weakness there still, it should have shown up in the last year in the sandbox.

+ The locking pins are week and sometimes fall out all together, when they become ditatched from the Trigger Mechinisum Housing. Allthough they are not suposed to.. Sticks make good replacements though :). If forced too hard you can dammage the steel housing making the gun unusable. So it will have to be returned for refit, or scrapped.

Replaced by sections of vehicle brake line tubing or copper radio antenna by some Gurkha L85A1 users.

+ The barrel of both the LSW and the IW overheat after 150 rounds aprox... and rounds jam soon after that, which is why there is an barrel replacemnt for LSW only as part of the A2 upgrade.

Plus the addition of the FN-Minimi SAW to the toybox, which should take off some of the strain. Of the stoppages I've experienced and observed with the L85A1, most were on semi-auto; there's a right easy fix for that! With the LSW, it was in the auto fire mode they had the problems you describe, interesting in that they fire automatically from the open bolt for better cooling.

+ The cocking handle is hard to access to cock the weapon, so it has been modified for the A2. Appears the whole palm of the hand can be used to get things moving if mud or sand gums up the works. An obvious external *spotrting featrure* of an L85A2

+ The Bolt rleace catch is weak, and becomes loose or drops off from time to time, orkward at the best of times.

I've observed L85A1 rifles with the bolt release removed. I expect that's why.

+ The issue bayonet is weak, and often snaps off in victims, reducing the future combat efficancy of the soldier...

I'll have to admit that I've never used the sticker in such a fashion. The lads with the Khukuris didnb't seem to be bothered by the idea, and neither was I. When I first made my acquaintance with them, I carried an oversize American Bowie knife, just as a bit of snittery. They were much taken by it, particularly the sharpened top edge, allowing a fast reverse slash. They presented me with a Kukri of my own, and I made their commander a present of my Texian toadsticker. When I returned to their fold a few months later, I was wearing the Khukuri they'd given me, and they seemed to approve of my decision and choice.

+ The holes above the barrel, often get mud sand etc, in and are hard to clean... And the Reciver often becomes cloged with debrey or sand...

The French issue a nice fitted bag for their FA-MAS Clarion. I've been known to use a tennis racket bag. Chicago musicians were said to be fond of violin/viola cases.

+ The dustcover is weak and often drops off altogether.

Bends rather easily too. Perhaps improved.

+ The safty catch is unrelyable, and can be bypassed if you press fimly enougth on the trigger. It also makes too much noise when you change from Safe to Ready.... This will give you away in an ambush situation.

Not as bad as a Kalishnikov, at least, and they're popular enough. I got taught to carry the thing in the *go* position, always, probably not an option for those Brit units with snoopy NCOs.

5) Why not use the dust cover when the weapon is cocked. Is because the weapon once fired can and dose catch on the dustcover and jams or brakes the dustcover alltogether, belive me iv'e done it myself so i don't put the dustcover once loaded.... Not sure if fixed for the A2, as this would increase reliablity in deasrt conditions.

I've seen a German MP44 similarly jammed. I'm less happy about the rattle of the dustv cover in the open position.

6) The only good thing about the SA80 is the SUSAT {Sight Unit Small Arms Trilux} sight it has an 4x magnification, can be set to ranges upto 800m. It also has an radioactive lighting elimet that iluminates the slight eliment, for low light or night combat. It also has inbuilt iron battle/emergancy sight ontop, and this can be used insted of the sight depending on personal prefrance, however is less accurate then the other iron sights provided. The SUSAT however is given mainly to frontline, Infantry or marksmanship weapons, however all most all of the weapons in my rgt have SUSATS, unless they have been dammaged or sent to someone else, who needs them more than we do. The susat makes an soldier an effective marksman and efficant at hitting targets individualy at 300m or as an section at 400m where as the LSW is individualy caperble of hitting targets at 600m and is increased by the A2 modifications to 800m.

Agreed that the SUSAT is superb; I'm fond of the earlier SUIT scole for the L1A1 SLR as well. If there's a bright and shining spot worth keeping the SA80 on, it's the accuracy of the weapon, nicely augmented by that neat optical sight. The new side-opening 40mm grenade launcher from H&K for the L85A2 is a slick little unit as well.

I liked the LSW but noticed noone else was carrying one and took the L85A1 I was offered instead. And found that the LSW gunners on our exercise were carrying M79 grenade launchers or Remington pump-action shotguns instead. Two Gimpys were along for the trip as well, but if we'd run into any trouble, it would have been the radios that got us out of a fix, not the shooters. But I learned a good deal about immediate action drills over the three weeks out bush.


173 posted on 04/24/2004 10:03:40 PM PDT by archy (The darkness will come. It will find you,and it will scare you like you've never been scared before.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 167 | View Replies]

To: Howlin
Heard this months before! M4 Carbine will be at service with our Armed forces!
174 posted on 04/25/2004 3:28:51 AM PDT by F14 Pilot (John ''Fedayeen" Kerry - the Mullahs' regime candidate)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 169 | View Replies]

To: archy
the whole gun rattles anyway, so why worry about the dustcover, it is held open by an spring, and dosn't make nearly as much noise as the losely fitting tmh.
175 posted on 04/25/2004 6:45:46 AM PDT by british-soldier (British eapon.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 173 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-5051-100101-150151-175 last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson