Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

U.S. Citizens Must Be Protected, Controlled, Regulated and Intimidated For Their Own Good
Too Good Reports ^ | Dec. 8, 2003 | Fred Reed

Posted on 12/08/2003 8:28:43 AM PST by Middle Man

I am sad to report that Mexico is the most criminal of countries. Let me illustrate.

Suppose that you were subject to, say, horrendous sinus infections or earaches. In America, by law you would have to get an appointment with a doctor, $75, thank you-when he had time, how about day after tomorrow, whereupon he would give you a prescription for amoxicillin, fifteen bucks and a trip to a pharmacy. If this happened on a Friday, you would either slit your wrists by Saturday evening to avoid the torture, or go to an emergency room, however distant, where they would charge you a fortune and give you a prescription for amoxicillin.

In Mexico, upon recognizing the familiar symptoms, you would go to the nearest farmacia and buy the amoxicillin. The agony would be nipped in the bud (presuming that agony has buds). The doctor would not get $75, which is against all principles of medicine. The pharmacist would not lose his license, as he would in the United States.

See? Criminality is legal in Mexico. That´s how bad things are.

Another grave crime here is horse abuse. Often you see a Mexican father clopping through town on an unregistered horse-yes: the horror-with his kid of five seated behind him. A large list of crimes leaps instantly to the North American mind. The kid is not in a governmentally sanctioned horse seat. He is not wearing a helmet. The father is not wearing a helmet. The horse is not wearing a helmet. The horse is not wearing a diaper. The horse does not have a parade permit. The horse doesn´t have turn signals. The father does not have a document showing that he went to a governmentally approved school and therefore knows how to operate a horse, which he has been doing since he was six years old.

In Mexico, if you want to ride a horse, you get one, or borrow one. If you don´t know how to ride it, you have someone to show you. Why any of this might interest the government is unclear to everybody, including the government.

You see. Here is the dark underside of Mexico. People do most things without supervision, as if they were adults.

This curious state of affairs, which might be called "freedom," has strange effects on gringos. Shortly after I moved here, I began to hear little voices. This worried me until I realized that I was next door to a grade school. Daily at noon a swarm of children erupted into the street, the girls chattering and running every which way, the boys shouting and roughhousing and playing what sounded like cowboys and Injuns.

In the United States, half of the boys would be forced to take drugs to make them inert. If they played anything involving guns, they would be suspended and forced to undergo psychiatric counseling, which would in all likelihood leave them in a state of murderous psychopathy. Wrestling would be violence, with the same results.

Here you see the extent to which, narcotically, Mexico lags the great powers. The Soviets drugged inconvenient adults into passivity. America drugs its little boys into passivity. Mexico doesn´t drug anyone.

In fiesta season, which just ended, everybody and his grand aunt Chuleta puts up a taco stand or booze stall on the plaza. Yes: In front of God and everybody. These do not have permits. They are just there. If you want a cuba libre, you give the nice lady twenty pesos and she hands it to you. That´s all. There is in this a simplicity that the North American instantly recognizes as dangerous. Where are the controls? Where are the rules? Why isn´t somebody watching these people? Heaven knows what might happen. They could be terrorists.

If you chose to wander around the plaza, drink in hand, and listen to the band, no one would care in the least, in part because they would be doing the same thing. If you didn´t finish your drink, and walked home with it, no one would pay the least attention.

In America this would be Drinking in Public. It would merit a night in jail followed by three months of compulsory Alcohol School. This would accomplish nothing of worth, but would put money in the pockets of controlling and vaguely hostile therapists, and let unhappy bureaucrats get even with people they suspect of enjoying themselves.

Mexicans seem to regard laws as interesting concepts that might merit thought at some later date. There is much to be said for this. The governmental attitude seems to be that if a thing doesn´t need regulating, then don´t regulate it. Life is much easier that way.

If a law doesn´t make sense in a particular instance, a Mexican will ignore it. Where I live it is common to see a driver go the wrong way on a one-way street to avoid a lengthy circumnavigation. Since speeds are about five miles an hour, it isn´t dangerous. The police don´t patrol because there isn´t enough crime (in my town: the big cities are as bad as ours) to justify it. It works. Everybody is happy, which isn´t a crime in Mexico.

I could go on. In Mexico, legally or not, people ride in the backs of pickup trucks if the mood strikes them. This is no doubt statistically more dangerous than being wrapped in a Kevlar crash-box with an oxygen system and automatic transfusion machine. They figure it is their business.

Here is an explanation of Mexican criminality. The United States realizes that a citizen must be protected whether he wants to be or not-controlled, regulated, and intimidated in every aspect of everything he does, for his own good. He must not be permitted to ride a bicycle without a helmet, smoke if he chooses, or go to a bar where smoking is permitted. He cannot be trusted to run his life.

Have you ever wondered how much good the endless surveillance, preaching, and rules really do? In some states your car won´t pass inspection if there is a crack in the windshield. There are-I don´t doubt?-studies measuring the carnage and economic wreckage concomitant to driving with a cracked windshield. Presumably whole hospitals groan at the seams (if that´s quite English) with the maimed and halt.

Or might it be that the rules are just stupid, the product of meddlesome bureaucrats and frightened petty officials with too much time on their hands? Maybe it would be better if they just got off our backs?

Nah.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Government; Mexico; News/Current Events; Philosophy; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: bureaucracy; fredreed; orwelliancontrol; tyranny; usmedicine; usregulation
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-79 next last

1 posted on 12/08/2003 8:28:44 AM PST by Middle Man
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Middle Man
Fred rocks BTTT
2 posted on 12/08/2003 8:33:59 AM PST by Semaphore Heathcliffe (FR and gold-eagle: the ultimate Red Pill coctkail.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Middle Man
If a law doesn´t make sense in a particular instance, a Mexican will ignore it.

So do most Americans...

3 posted on 12/08/2003 8:34:48 AM PST by SunStar (Democrats piss me off!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Middle Man
I buy my amoxicillin, ampicillin, tetracycline, etc. at the local feed store.

It's for my livestock, you understand.

4 posted on 12/08/2003 8:35:50 AM PST by snopercod (The federal government will spend $21,000 per household in 2003, up from $16,000 in 1999.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: snopercod
Ditto on the antibiotics. There is not much that does not cross over either. God bless the farm supply.

The only annoyance is when cutting those large oblets in half, then quaters, the sharp angles make the pill snag in your throat. I now just crush em and put it in an empty capsule instead.

5 posted on 12/08/2003 8:45:31 AM PST by blackdog (Proudly raising Wisconsin racing sheep since 1998......Sheep Darby tripple crown winners fer sure)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: snopercod
The problem with this is that antibiotics are already way over perscribed. This is exascerbated in countries like Mexico and other 3rd world nations who don't require perscriptions for them. We are creating super-germs that are becomming ammune to antibotics and soon we will have no defense against them.
6 posted on 12/08/2003 8:46:01 AM PST by marlon
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Middle Man
Everybody is happy, which isn´t a crime in Mexico.

Hmmmm...good. If their so happy, there should be many less of them coming over the US border illegaly next year.

7 posted on 12/08/2003 8:46:42 AM PST by BureaucratusMaximus (if we're not going to act like a constitutional republic...lets be the best empire we can be...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: biblewonk
{ping} This is great!
8 posted on 12/08/2003 8:48:56 AM PST by newgeezer (Can I turn Daschle into a Newt by clicking that new "Spell" button?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Middle Man
Great article. Thanks for improving my day!!
9 posted on 12/08/2003 8:51:30 AM PST by EggsAckley (..................."Dean's got Tom McClintock Eyes".........................)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blackdog
Do the feed stores ever question what you're buying them for? I'm wondering if California, which regulates EVERYTHING, has regulated this.
10 posted on 12/08/2003 8:52:33 AM PST by EggsAckley (..................."Dean's got Tom McClintock Eyes".........................)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Middle Man
Or might it be that the rules are just stupid, the product of meddlesome bureaucrats and frightened petty officials with too much time on their hands? Maybe it would be better if they just got off our backs?

My wife is from Mexico, and I've noticed many of the same things as in this article. We are supposed to be the free country, but as for the dignity of doing what one thinks is right for one's self or family - Mexico is head and shoulders ahead of us in practical terms. Now, of course, I don't live in Mexico and wouldn't ever want to - and neither does my wife. There IS a deep corruption like we don't have here, the place is mostly as poor as dirt, medical care really sucks (even if you can walk down the street and get your antibiotic of choice without a scrip), and crime is awful. As a gringo - forget it, you wouldn't last a week outside of the tourist traps. Oh, and you can't legally get a gun - on THAT score, the Mexicans are about as bad as NYC or DC.

One thing that Reed didn't mention: the reason for this apparent freedom in Mexico is simple: there's no money in it for the authorities to be repressive, certainly not as repressive as the laws in Mexico allow them to be. However, if there's a way to relieve someone of their money, rest assured that the policia will find it. There's little wonder why one of the past police chiefs of Mexico City amassed a fortune of something like $12 million on his annual salary of about $8,000, or why one of the past presidents of Mexico is worth well over $1 billion. If Mexico was a richer society, I promise you that it would be far more repressive. That's probably the reason that we have to get permission to do just about anything here: the application/permit costs money.

11 posted on 12/08/2003 8:53:16 AM PST by Ancesthntr
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Middle Man
Since it wasn't mentioned, I'm guessing Mexican "freedom" ends somewhere south of anything resembling our (nearly meaningless) Second Amendment.
12 posted on 12/08/2003 8:53:17 AM PST by newgeezer (What part of "shall not be infringed" does our nanny state fail to understand?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Middle Man
But you can't drink the water!
13 posted on 12/08/2003 8:53:59 AM PST by Gunner9mm
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: newgeezer
Either they don't allow women to vote, or they are a few hundred thousand lawyers shy of a devoloped country.
14 posted on 12/08/2003 8:56:11 AM PST by biblewonk (I must answer all bible questions.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Middle Man
It's only because they can't pay for any more tyranny than they already have. Count on economic development to change that.
15 posted on 12/08/2003 8:56:45 AM PST by thoughtomator (The U.N. is a terrorist organization)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: newgeezer
The minute someone's uninsured horse poops on someone elses Lexus all bets are off. The minute that Lexus owner's kid gets a ride on a horse and falls off and scrapes his ematiated knee, bing, there goe the lack of safety rules. The minute the Lexus owner drinks too much taquila(sp) at a taco stand and crashes his Lexus into a parked manure cart, there go the taco stands and open drinks because He sued for their carelessly selling to him. It's the yuppy bastards that are causing all of our trouble. And their wives. Probably mostly their wives.
16 posted on 12/08/2003 9:02:39 AM PST by biblewonk (I must answer all bible questions.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: thoughtomator
For all Mexico's faults, the man does have a point.
The public schools really reveal how bad it has become. They have thrown out any common sense and replaced it with
zero tolerance.
17 posted on 12/08/2003 9:07:14 AM PST by Cowgirl
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: biblewonk
Either they don't allow women to vote, or they are a few hundred thousand lawyers shy of a devoloped country.

From the sound of it, I'd think both would have to be true!

18 posted on 12/08/2003 9:11:37 AM PST by newgeezer (What part of "shall not be infringed" does our nanny state fail to understand?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Middle Man
HE still makes some good points, but ole Fred has long since gone a little "weird". It is part of his charm though.
19 posted on 12/08/2003 9:28:21 AM PST by Paradox (Cogito ergo boom.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: marlon
We are creating super-germs that are becomming ammune to antibotics and soon we will have no defense against them.

I read something interesting about this serveral years ago. It was written by a medical professional, perhaps a researcher. He claimed that the antibiotics were not actually creating the "superbugs", but that the "superbugs" already existed. The "everyday" bugs were being killed-off routinely by the antibiotics, making incidents of infection by the "superbugs" seem more serious.

Let me try to make this more clear:
Let's say that in 1960, there were 100 total flu deaths in a particular region.
80 of the deaths were from "everyday" flu bugs (80%), and 20 were from "superbugs" (20%).
Fast-forward 40 years to 2000. In 2000 in the same region, effective medicines were now available to treat/kill the "everyday" flu bugs, so there were only 40 flu deaths: 20 from "everyday" flu bugs(50%) and 20 from "superbugs" (50%).

The conclusion of, say, the NY Times: OMG!!! The "superbug" deaths are up 30% in the last 40 years!!! Our current medicines must be mutating them!! We must put a halt to the medicines that are effective on the "everyday" flu bugs!! People cannot be given these effective medicines!!! A massive Gov't program is needed to stop the Dubya-friendly drug companies from selling effective "everyday" bug medicines!! It's Dubya' fault! Elect Hillary before it's too late and "The Children" die at Dubya's own hand!! She's for "The Children"!! She had a Socialized Medicine Plan that was killed by the Vast Right-Wing Conspiracy!!

Hmm. Maybe I went a little overboard on that last part, but I think you get the "gist" of it.

Comments?

20 posted on 12/08/2003 9:42:17 AM PST by Ignatz (Helping people be more like me since 1960)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Gunner9mm
But the beers are great (Dos Equis, Carta Blanca, etc, etc)
21 posted on 12/08/2003 10:25:39 AM PST by Middle Man
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: snopercod
A riding teacher years ago showed me some medicine for kidney ailments in horses that had a label stating "Suitable for use by Man or beast". ;^)
22 posted on 12/08/2003 10:28:25 AM PST by Middle Man
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Ancesthntr
BTTT
23 posted on 12/08/2003 10:30:51 AM PST by Middle Man
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Middle Man
BUMP!
24 posted on 12/08/2003 10:35:29 AM PST by Constitution Day (Please do not emanate into the penumbra.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: marlon
The problem with this is that antibiotics are already way over perscribed. This is exascerbated in countries like Mexico and other 3rd world nations who don't require perscriptions for them. We are creating super-germs that are becomming ammune to antibotics and soon we will have no defense against them.

Good point. The people with a medicine cabinet full of half-used bottles of antibiotics are more of a threat to public health than the ones with a bag of pot in their nightstand.

25 posted on 12/08/2003 10:36:22 AM PST by tacticalogic (Controlled application of force is the sincerest form of communication.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Ancesthntr; agitator
"...there's no money in it for the authorities to be repressive, certainly not as repressive as the laws in Mexico allow them to be. However, if there's a way to relieve someone of their money, rest assured that the policia will find it."

I've heard traffic court in America referred to as a "sheep-shearing conveyor belt", and after experiencing it once first-hand believe our bandoleros in blue have found a way.

I called "911" after a burglary years ago and the responding officer was little more than bemused and bored as he filled out a report for the insurance company.

26 posted on 12/08/2003 10:40:07 AM PST by Middle Man
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Ignatz
He claimed that the antibiotics were not actually creating the "superbugs", but that the "superbugs" already existed. The "everyday" bugs were being killed-off routinely by the antibiotics, making incidents of infection by the "superbugs" seem more serious.

I think that part of the problem is that we've gone overboard on making everything "sanitary" - we're crippling our immune systems from disuse. You read about people getting deathly ill from e-coli they got in a burger at a fast food place, but never about anyone who lives on a ranch or cattle farm getting ill from it, and they're exposed to it every day.

27 posted on 12/08/2003 10:41:38 AM PST by tacticalogic (Controlled application of force is the sincerest form of communication.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Middle Man
Suppose that you were subject to, say, horrendous sinus infections or earaches. In America, by law you would have to get an appointment with a doctor, $75, thank you-when he had time, how about day after tomorrow, whereupon he would give you a prescription for amoxicillin, fifteen bucks and a trip to a pharmacy. If this happened on a Friday, you would either slit your wrists by Saturday evening to avoid the torture, or go to an emergency room, however distant, where they would charge you a fortune and give you a prescription for amoxicillin.

In Mexico, upon recognizing the familiar symptoms, you would go to the nearest farmacia and buy the amoxicillin. The agony would be nipped in the bud (presuming that agony has buds). The doctor would not get $75, which is against all principles of medicine. The pharmacist would not lose his license, as he would in the United States.

That's the way it was I visited France also on a college vacation. I got s minor intestinal infection by eating something no good, and I went to the nearest pharmacie and got an antibiotic in capsule form, after telling the pharmacist that I did not want the suppository form ;-)
28 posted on 12/08/2003 10:46:52 AM PST by george wythe
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SunStar
Americans ignore some laws only because we have been legislated to death and can't keep up with what the offense du jour is.
29 posted on 12/08/2003 10:48:20 AM PST by Middle Man
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: george wythe
On trips to England I have used the National Health Service. I am not for socialized medicine but have to say about countries like Britain and Japan: At least they get something back for all the taxes they pay!

We Americans get nothing, plus our state-of-the-art defense systems can't even stop the occasional ragtag terrorist cell armed with box cutters, except to make air travel even more miserable for us.

30 posted on 12/08/2003 10:55:13 AM PST by Middle Man
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: Middle Man
We Americans get nothing, plus our state-of-the-art defense systems can't even stop the occasional ragtag terrorist cell armed with box cutters, except to make air travel even more miserable for us.

Well, I don't agree that we "get nothing" but I do agree about the state of the art-defenses not stopping the terrorists. What's really bizarre is that after the security checks and intel failed, the first thing the did was disarm the one thing that did work.

31 posted on 12/08/2003 10:59:12 AM PST by tacticalogic (Controlled application of force is the sincerest form of communication.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: thoughtomator
"Count on economic development to change that."

Axiom derived from anecdotal evidence: if there's enough "fat of the land" for a parasitic criminal class -- be they a criminal underclass or government employees -- they will be emboldened to operate in the open without fear of punishment.

32 posted on 12/08/2003 11:02:28 AM PST by Middle Man
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: tacticalogic
At the moment though employed I do not have health insurance for my family and me (can't afford it and at $500+-a-month premiums they cover next to nothing anyway). As a self-employed contractor, the only people I know who have affordable health care and peace of mind are either themselves government employees or have a spouse who works for government, either federal, state or local.
33 posted on 12/08/2003 11:07:20 AM PST by Middle Man
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: tacticalogic
I get it but that was not my understanding of the problem. If it is as you say, and I don't know for sure, then I would agree with your point. My understanding was that in many cases germs are becomming stronger, kinda of like a Darwinian thing. The strongest survive and are either immune to or much more resistant to antiibotics. In that scenario then today's antibiotics couldn't fight them off.
34 posted on 12/08/2003 11:14:20 AM PST by marlon
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Middle Man
Well, we can't have some petty bureaucrat showing up to check on your building permits spreading germs to you and you crew, can we?
35 posted on 12/08/2003 11:14:37 AM PST by tacticalogic (Controlled application of force is the sincerest form of communication.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: Middle Man
"Have you ever wondered how much good the endless surveillance, preaching, and rules really do?"

Good question. They will lead to a collective nervous breakdown.

36 posted on 12/08/2003 11:15:13 AM PST by The Westerner
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: snopercod
Do you need a vet's prescription to buy those or can you buy them over the counter?

They took PPA (used to be in Dimetapp) off the market for humans due to junk science and replaced it with something that causes severe rebound effects and hypertension. But PPA is still available for pets. But I thought you needed a vet's prescription, because I looked into ordering it on the web.

37 posted on 12/08/2003 11:16:57 AM PST by DannyTN
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: The Westerner; Middle Man
There is a middle ground somewhere.

I agree there are so many rules they lead to confusion and disdain for the law. On the otherhand, Pedro is walking home with a drink in his hand or at best riding his horse or mule, he's not driving 2 tons of metal at 70 miles an hour.
And I have a friend who was arrested for public drunkeness in Mexico. So they aren't rule free either.

38 posted on 12/08/2003 11:20:11 AM PST by DannyTN
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

To: Middle Man
In Mexico, upon recognizing the familiar symptoms, you would go to the nearest farmacia and buy the amoxicillin. The agony would be nipped in the bud (presuming that agony has buds). The doctor would not get $75, which is against all principles of medicine. The pharmacist would not lose his license, as he would in the United States. See? Criminality is legal in Mexico. That´s how bad things are.

oh, so THAT's where all the super-bugs are coming from - self-medicating peasants SOTB.

39 posted on 12/08/2003 11:21:57 AM PST by King Prout (...he took a face from the ancient gallery, then he... walked on down the hall....)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: marlon
When people are prescribed antibiotics, they often stop taking them as soon as they feel better. At this point, the antibiotics have killed most of the infection, but there are still some left. These are the ones that are resistant, and by not finishing them off they insure that that trait gets passed on.
40 posted on 12/08/2003 11:32:23 AM PST by tacticalogic (Controlled application of force is the sincerest form of communication.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: DannyTN
OTC. Don't go to a vet. Go to a feed store.

Here in the country, even the local hardware stores carry the stuff. Injectibles, too.

41 posted on 12/08/2003 11:50:03 AM PST by snopercod (The federal government will spend $21,000 per household in 2003, up from $16,000 in 1999.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: Middle Man
In fiesta season, which just ended, everybody and his grand aunt Chuleta puts up a taco stand or booze stall on the plaza. Yes: In front of God and everybody. These do not have permits.

In Santa Maria, CA, with it's heavily Mexican population, BBQ stands are set up Saturday on just about every corner on Broadway.

I live in NC now and thought of doing the same thing here in our little town since I can't find a da*n job. So I made the mistake of visiting the County Health Department to see what would be required to get a permit to do that.

I would have had put up a screened enclosure with fly fans, hot and cold running water and a sink to wash my hands. The temperature of the water would have to be monitored. I would need a refrigerator (also monitored), and restroom facilities.

All food would have to be prepared in a Class A restaurant - no food prep on site. Neither could I sell any food containing mayonaise.

Needless to say, I have forgotten about that idea.

Oh yes, my brother told me that the city fathers in Santa Maria tried to do the same thing to the BBQ stands there. They were gone for about a month, until the local population revolted and demanded that they be allowed to return.

42 posted on 12/08/2003 12:01:00 PM PST by snopercod (The federal government will spend $21,000 per household in 2003, up from $16,000 in 1999.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: tacticalogic
That's pretty interesting. I grew up on a farm, and believe me, I was in direct contact with animal wastes on a daily basis. I never had an e.coli infection. You may be on to something, tl!

43 posted on 12/08/2003 12:11:44 PM PST by Ignatz (Helping people be more like me since 1960)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: george wythe
after telling the pharmacist that I did not want the suppository form

France, eh? The pharmacist must have been terribly disappointed!

44 posted on 12/08/2003 12:15:58 PM PST by Ignatz (Helping people be more like me since 1960)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: All
http://www.santamariatimes.com/articles/2002/08/17/news/export4045.txt

Crackdown on catering trucks

By Jasmine Marshall and Elizabeth Rodriguez / Times Staff Writers

SANTA MARIA -- Catering trucks have become so popular with Santa Marians, some restaurant owners are thinking of foregoing their more expensive rent and overhead in favor offering a moveable feast. Others are fed up with the trend because they say the trucks are flouting health and operating codes while cutting into their business.

"Many of my permanent facility operators have said they want to sell and get a truck because they just can't make it," confirms Richard Furtado, an inspector for Santa Barbara County's Environmental Health Department, which handles permits and inspections for the food industry.

One restaurant owner who doesn't plan to sell her business and buy a truck is Petra Hernandez. With her husband, Hernandez operates the El Rey Del Taco restaurant on West Main Street. She's fed up with catering truck operators who she says have set up permanent shop at several locations on Main Street and Broadway.

"These trucks are here all the time. Morning, noon and night. They don't move," said Hernandez, showing a photo she recently took documenting a catering truck open for business and serving a customer after dark.

The city of Santa Maria does not permit catering vehicles to sell food between the hours of 6 p.m. and 7 a.m. The trucks are also not supposed to be parked for more than 30 minutes at any location on public streets. Catering vehicles parked on private property must have written permission from the owner and cannot stay for more than 70 minutes before moving to another location for at least two hours.

Hernandez said that isn't happening. She claims catering trucks are operating like restaurants, not moving at all.

"It isn't fair to those of us who follow the laws and codes," Hernandez said. "If you get your permits and follow the laws, then fine, I have no problem with you. But many of them (catering trucks) aren't. They don't pay for business licenses or go through the same health inspection process."

While catering vehicles are supposed to be inspected on a yearly basis, it's up to the operators to come in and apply for the permits, Fertado said.

"A lot of them are not being inspected," said Furtado. "It's on their honor to come in and get the permits, and they don't always."

Many of the catering trucks appear to be coming from Southern California, as are produce trucks, ice cream carts and corn vendors, hoping to capture the lucrative market of Santa Maria's Latino immigrant population. "Coyotes" often bring up newly arrived Mexican immigrants, desperate for work to sell food on the streets. Their customers may be purchasing snow cones, meat or corn kept in unsanitary conditions, but they rarely file complaints with his department, Furtado said.

Spurred by complaints by permanent restaurant owners like Hernandez, Santa Maria's code compliance department has asked the Santa Maria Police Department begin investigating whether the catering trucks violating the law. It won't be the first time the issue has been brought up according to Wendy Stockton, senior deputy city attorney.

"It's cyclical," said Stockton. The city typically investigates and prosecutes catering trucks violating city codes after receiving complaints from business owners like Hernandez.

Some catering truck owners said they follow guidelines to run their business and have no fear of a city crackdown.

The owner of Nohely's Hot Lunch, parked on Main Street, said he has had commercial permits for many years. He did not give his name. Though he did not wish to show the permits, he insisted he does indeed have permits.

"I don't know what you're trying to get at, but otherwise how could I be here," he said in Spanish.

At 3:30 p.m. Friday afternoon Nohely's Hot Lunch was parked at the corner of Kathleen Lane and Main Street. The owner of the truck said he doesn't stay there all day, he moves further west on Main Street where the farm workers are.

Delfino Cuevas, owner of Tacos y Mariscos El Rinconsito de Mexico, was eager to show his permits from both Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo counties. Cuevas said, in Spanish, he takes his truck to San Luis Obispo during the day and comes to Santa Maria in the evenings. He said he moves around different parts of town approximately every hour and added he knows of catering trucks that stay in one location all day.

The food he serves, Cuevas said, is bought at La Chiquita Market and cooked in the truck. He said he has a permit to cook in the truck as well.

Alfonso Navarro, who works for the Tacos y Mariscos El Tapatio, also known as "A Touch of Class," also had no qualms about showing his permits from Santa Barbara County and Santa Maria. He said they have unannounced health inspections, and "that's good," he said in Spanish.

The "Touch of Class" truck is plugged into an electrical outlet in the parking lot of Calderon's Tires. Navarro said the truck owner has a symbiotic relationship with the owners of the tire shop: The catering truck employees keep the tire shop bathrooms clean and the truck can use electricity.

Another employee of the catering truck said the best way to know whether or not a catering truck has a permit from the health department is to look for a sticker similar to that of a Department of Motor Vehicles license plate tag.

Policing the catering trucks is difficult for the Santa Maria Police Department, when officers already have their hands full dealing with crimes and safety calls, said Sgt. Scott Vales.

But Hernandez said the issue is important, especially as merchants like herself are trying to revitalize northwest Santa Maria.

"This isn't how we want Santa Maria to look," she said pointing at a photo of a catering truck. "We're the All-America City, but this makes us look like East L.A."

* Staff writer Jasmine Marshall can be reached at (805) 739-2219, or by e-mail at jmarshall@pulitzer.net. Staff writer Elizabeth Rodriguez can be reached at (805) 347-4580 or by e-mail at erodriguez@pulitzer.net.

August 17, 2002
45 posted on 12/08/2003 12:16:54 PM PST by snopercod (The federal government will spend $21,000 per household in 2003, up from $16,000 in 1999.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: Ignatz
I never had an e.coli infection.

Sure you did, probably at a very early age. Your immune system learned how to recognize it, and how to make the antibodies to kill it. Every time it got re-introduced into your system, that response was reinforced.

46 posted on 12/08/2003 12:21:26 PM PST by tacticalogic (Controlled application of force is the sincerest form of communication.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: Ignatz
Comments?

Influenza ("flu") is caused by a virus...

47 posted on 12/08/2003 12:21:28 PM PST by ArrogantBustard
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Middle Man
Free country my ass.

We really have lost so many freedoms so fast and nobody is doing a damn thing about it.
48 posted on 12/08/2003 12:29:17 PM PST by AAABEST
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Middle Man
I've heard traffic court in America referred to as a "sheep-shearing conveyor belt", and after experiencing it once first-hand believe our bandoleros in blue have found a way.

I have beaten 7 out of 10 traffic infraction citations in Georgia to-date. They write tickets like crazy in Atlanta. Sometimes they just pull me over and go fishing.

In three of the tickets, the officer never showed up. Dismissed. In four of the others, I successfully argued before the judge and won.

Never plead Guilty or Nolo Contendre to a traffic ticket. Forcing them to prove their point often yields positive results.

49 posted on 12/08/2003 12:38:17 PM PST by Lazamataz (PROUDLY POSTING WITHOUT READING THE ARTICLE SINCE 1999!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: snopercod
hmmm, well that works for antibiotics, but a quick scan of feed stores indicates they don't carry PPA.

Apparently nobody cares if livestock has allergies. It's sort of like the Elvis version of Old McDonald. "If that cow gets out of line....Hamburger Medium Rare."


Elvis Presley
Old MacDonald
Written by - Randy Starr

Old MacDonald had a farm
E I E I O
And on that farm he had some chicks
E I E I O
With a cluck, cluck here, a cluck, cluck there
Loud as they could be
And when those chicks got out of line
Chicken fricasee
With a cluck, cluck here, a cluck, cluck there
Loud as they could be
And when those chicks got out of line
Chicken fricasee

Well, Old MacDonald had a farm
E I E I O
And on that farm he had some cows
E I E I O
With a moo, moo here, a moo, moo there
Cattle everywhere
And when those cows got out of line
Hamburger, medium rare
With a moo, moo here, a moo, moo there
Cattle everywhere
And when those cows got out of line
Hamburger, medium rare

Oh...well, Old MacDonald had a farm
E I E I O
And on that farm he had some pigs
E I E I O
With an oink, oink here, an oink, oink there
Pigs everywhere in sight
And when those pigs got out of line
Pork and beans at night
With an oink, oink here, an oink, oink there
Pigs everywhere in sight
And when those pigs got out of line
Pork and beans at night

Well I'm gonna have a farm one day
E I E I O
And I'll do things McDonald's way
E I E I O
With a cluck, cluck here, a cluck, cluck there
A moo, moo here, a moo, moo there
An oink, oink here, an oink, oink there
And I can promise you
If those animals ever get out of line
We'll have a mulligan stew...
How about you?
Back
Home
50 posted on 12/08/2003 4:06:45 PM PST by DannyTN
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-79 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson