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Stacking the Hunt (canned hunting is more than crass — it's cruel)
New York Times ^ | December 9, 2003 | WAYNE PACELLE

Posted on 12/09/2003 7:11:23 AM PST by presidio9

W

ASHINGTON — This fall, more than 10 million Americans went hunting. Some met with success, maybe even managing to bring home some ducks or geese or a deer. Of those who returned empty-handed, many did so with the knowledge that a fair hunt comes with no guarantees.

A growing number of people, however, are embracing a different set of rules — they're taking part in hunts that are largely rigged. In the United States, there are at least 4,000 "canned hunting" operations, where people may pay thousands of dollars to pursue trophy animals that have little chance to escape. Bird-shooting operations offer pheasants, quail, partridges and mallard ducks, sometimes dizzying the birds and planting them in front of hunters or tossing them from towers toward waiting shotguns.

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At ranches catering to big-game enthusiasts, hunters can shoot exotic species native to five continents — everything from addax to zebra. "Tired of traveling, spending money and coming home with nothing to show for it?" reads an advertisement on the Web site for Old Stone Fence Hunting Adventures in Rensselaer Falls, N.Y. "Book your successful trophy hunt today! . . . No license required; no harvest — no charge." Though enterprises like this claim to offer "fair chase" hunts, the promise is hollow, since the animals are confined in fences and the money changes hands only if the hunter gets a trophy.

How does an Arabian oryx or a Russian boar find its way to a hunting ground in Pennsylvania or Texas? Many are obtained at exotic animal auctions. A sale at one auction last year included zebras, camels, ostriches, kangaroos and lion cubs — some destined for canned hunts, some for private collections. The three-day sale of 3,225 animals brought in more than $1.5 million.

Of course, no one would expect someone like me — a person who works for the Humane Society — to support canned hunting. But in this fight, animal advocates are not alone. A good many hunters also find the practice abhorrent. In its 2003 national hunting survey, Field & Stream magazine asked readers what they thought about hunting animals "in enclosures or fenced-in ranches." Sixty-five percent of those who responded opposed the practice; 12 percent endorsed it and 23 percent said they had no opinion. Game ranches have also been denounced by a number of outdoor sporting groups, including the Izaak Walton League of America, the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and the Boone and Crockett Club, which oversees national hunting records.

The hunts go on, though, in part because they have the support of the National Rifle Association and Safari Club International, a pre-eminent trophy hunting organization.

In fact, it's the Safari Club's award program that helps to drive patronage of canned hunting operations. To win the club's Africa Big Five award, for example, you have to go to Africa to shoot the elephant, the rhinoceros and the leopard, but you can pick off the Cape buffalo and the lion in the United States. There is even an award for Introduced Trophy Animals of North America, in which you can do all your hunting for 18 different species right here at home. In fact, you can shoot all of the species for an award category at just one place. It's one-stop shopping. No more expensive fortnights in the wilds of Africa — and no one to know whether the head mounted above the mantel came from Asia or Oklahoma.

But canned hunting is more than crass — it's cruel. Animals are sometimes drugged, shot in their cages or at a feeder, or killed slowly with spears. Despite this, only 13 states have passed laws to ban canned hunts involving mammals. This year, New York almost passed such a law, but it was vetoed in August by Gov. George Pataki. New York lawmakers should try again. And so should legislators in other states and in Congress, which has the authority to ban the interstate transport of exotic mammals destined for canned hunts.

Canned hunting belongs in the same category as other forms of animal abuse, like cockfighting and bullfighting. It's hard on animals and easy on people — and it should be against the law.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial; Miscellaneous; Philosophy
KEYWORDS: animalrights; hunting
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1 posted on 12/09/2003 7:11:24 AM PST by presidio9
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To: presidio9
Oh, Wacko Wayne Pacelle, the biggest "animal rights" nut in the country after Ingrid Newkirk.

How predictable.

2 posted on 12/09/2003 7:13:34 AM PST by Kenton (This space for rent)
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To: presidio9
Frankly, canned hunting is an apt metaphor
for the way the mutual fund sharpies skimmed
all the widows and orphans.
3 posted on 12/09/2003 7:16:51 AM PST by NativeNewYorker (Freepin' Jew Boy)
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To: presidio9
A good many hunters also find the practice abhorrent.

So do I. The process is as important as the product.
It's the hunting equivalent to buying a hooker because your too inadequate to snag a female.

4 posted on 12/09/2003 7:25:16 AM PST by elbucko
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To: Kenton
I'm sure you know this, but for everyone else's information, Wayne Pacelle is a senior vice president of the Humane Society.
5 posted on 12/09/2003 7:25:48 AM PST by presidio9 (Islam is as Islam does)
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To: presidio9
canned hunting is weak.
6 posted on 12/09/2003 7:27:29 AM PST by Pikamax
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To: presidio9
Wayne Pacelle is a senior vice president of the Humane Society.

I didn't...thanks for the info.

..their a crop, like corn/soy beans and the Hunters are paying a high price for the hunt, thereby providing a range for other animal species....besides the animals don't know it.

7 posted on 12/09/2003 7:31:53 AM PST by skinkinthegrass (Just because you're paranoid, doesn't mean they aren't out to get you :)
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To: presidio9
>A growing number of people, however, are embracing a different set of rules



8 posted on 12/09/2003 7:32:23 AM PST by theFIRMbss
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To: presidio9
Wayne Pacelle is a senior vice president of the Humane Society.

I didn't...thanks for the info.

..their a crop, like corn/soy beans and the Hunters are paying a high price for the hunt, thereby providing a range for other animal species....besides the animals don't know it.

9 posted on 12/09/2003 7:35:23 AM PST by skinkinthegrass (Just because you're paranoid, doesn't mean they aren't out to get you :)
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To: presidio9
While I don't agree with the drugging, shooting in cages, etc. It needs to be noted that these are not in a small fenced area, they are on large acreage parcels of land that are fenced to keep the dangerous animals from roaming onto someone elses land and attacking a person.

I couldn't afford to hunt at one of these places, let alone in Africa, and I don't think I would anyway. However, these places may become the only places to hunt if the environuts get their way. Of course, they could also get closed up by the environuts.
10 posted on 12/09/2003 7:36:17 AM PST by looscnnn ("Live free or die; death is not the worst of evils" Gen. John Stark 1809)
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To: skinkinthegrass
..their a crop, like corn/soy beans and the Hunters are paying a high price for the hunt, thereby providing a range for other animal species....besides the animals don't know it.

My neighbors raise pheasants in a large netted enclosure and then release them in a field the day of the hunt. These birds are fairly tame and often don't bolt until the hunters are right on top of them, making for a rather easy shot. In a way, it's not any different from raising a chicken to chop off its neck prior to dinner, but I don't consider the hunting involved very sporting.

11 posted on 12/09/2003 7:37:25 AM PST by dirtboy (New Ben and Jerry's flavor - Howard Dean Swirl - no ice cream, just fruit at bottom)
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To: elbucko
So do I. The process is as important as the product. It's the hunting equivalent to buying a hooker because your too inadequate to snag a female.

I agree, insomuch as the term 'hunting' is used. It's a rather "girly-man" way to bag a beast.

I don't find it particularly cruel, however - and anyone who does has bought into the PETA dogma. Anyone who claims this is cruel has to then be upset about animals raised in pens for slaughter. And I'm not giving up bacon.
12 posted on 12/09/2003 7:40:05 AM PST by beezdotcom
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To: presidio9
What's the sport in hunting cans? Reminds me of that scene in The Jerk, "...he hates these cans."
13 posted on 12/09/2003 7:40:53 AM PST by dfwgator (Are you blind with an IQ under 50? Then you too can be an ACC football referee.)
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To: dirtboy
If you know a kid in 1-3 grade, read this book to him or her:


14 posted on 12/09/2003 7:54:47 AM PST by presidio9 (Islam is as Islam does)
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To: beezdotcom; elbucko
This is classic divide-and-conquer by HSUS. The concept of hunting "fenced" animals is naturally repugnant to ethical hunters, yet the reality is that the "fences" contain hundreds and frequently thousands of acres.

If you value hunting, don't fall for this nonsense and support a ban on so-called "canned" hunts. Like "assault" weapons, it's part of an incrementalist strategy.

15 posted on 12/09/2003 7:56:39 AM PST by d-back
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To: beezdotcom
I saw a film of a black leopard that had been declawed and released from a cage in front of some "good ol' boys" with a dozen dogs. The dogs promptly tore the leopard apart and the owners cheered and stood with one foot on the leopard in victory. Now that is a real bunch of men.
16 posted on 12/09/2003 8:03:06 AM PST by ThinkLikeWaterAndReeds
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To: beezdotcom
I saw a film of a black leopard that had been declawed and released from a cage in front of some "good ol' boys" with a dozen dogs. The dogs promptly tore the leopard apart and the owners cheered and stood with one foot on the leopard in victory. Now that is a real bunch of men.
17 posted on 12/09/2003 8:03:14 AM PST by ThinkLikeWaterAndReeds
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To: ThinkLikeWaterAndReeds
I saw a film of a black leopard that had been declawed and released from a cage in front of some "good ol' boys" with a dozen dogs. The dogs promptly tore the leopard apart and the owners cheered and stood with one foot on the leopard in victory. Now that is a real bunch of men.

No argument. Nonetheless, I'd rather be THAT leopard than a pig in a slaughterhouse. More than that, I'd rather just eat them both.
18 posted on 12/09/2003 8:05:30 AM PST by beezdotcom
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To: d-back
I say anyone that would go on one of these hunts is a mouth-breathing girly man no matter how much land the animals are fenced in.

The analogy of the nerd using hookers because that's all he can get is extremely accurate. These clowns would soil themselves on a real hunt.

Personally I adhere to the "Nugent Doctrine" when it comes to my hunting. I much prefer the crossbow to a rifle and the process of tracking the beast is where I get most of my enjoyment. I even think the use of feeders really reduces the challenge, but hey, if you're not up to it, you're not up to it.

19 posted on 12/09/2003 8:07:59 AM PST by Zansman
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To: beezdotcom
I don't find it particularly cruel, however

I don't either, in general, except that some (perhaps most) of these people are horrible shots, and end up mangling the animal before it finally dies. When it takes you 3 or 4 shots at 10 feet to kill a pheasant on a short leash, that's pretty lame.

I love hunting, but if you're going to do something like that, why not just beat it to death with a baseball bat?
20 posted on 12/09/2003 8:08:06 AM PST by non-anonymous
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To: d-back; elbucko
If you value hunting, don't fall for this nonsense and support a ban on so-called "canned" hunts. Like "assault" weapons, it's part of an incrementalist strategy.

I had to read this statement TWICE to realize that you WEREN'T advocating such a ban.
21 posted on 12/09/2003 8:08:11 AM PST by beezdotcom
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To: beezdotcom
"Don't fall for this nonsense." STOP "Don't support a ban on so-called canned hunts." STOP

How's that?

22 posted on 12/09/2003 8:11:17 AM PST by d-back
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To: ChrisCoolC
I don't either, in general, except that some (perhaps most) of these people are horrible shots, and end up mangling the animal before it finally dies.

But again, if this bothers you, don't eat ANY meat, since there are undoubtedly hundreds of less-than-clean kills daily amongst the many thousands in slaughterhouses around the country.

Again, if this bothers you (the abstract 'you', not the personal 'you'), don't support ANY hunting, because these same people aren't going to do any better when they go "real" hunting - in THAT case, the wounded animal might successfully drag itself out of range to suffer an even MORE prolonged agony.

All this to say that I think "canned" hunting is pretty sissified, but I don't support banning it.
23 posted on 12/09/2003 8:13:00 AM PST by beezdotcom
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To: d-back
LOL...much better for simpletons like me!
24 posted on 12/09/2003 8:14:04 AM PST by beezdotcom
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To: presidio9
The fact that you are in a high position in the Humane Society does not diminish what you have to say about canned hunts.I myself shot and had a rug made of an eleven hundred pound Grizzly and a two hundred and forty pound Black Bear while stationed in Alaska in 1970. I was alone both times although others were in my hunting-fishing parties,one would be a fool to hunt big game without at least one companion. Now as far as those who hunt under controlled conditions I can only say that they are either lazy,inept or cowardly.However a real hunter or fisherman does not desire a sure thing,I know this from personal experience and that of my friends, our enjoyment is in the hunt not the kill,I say this for myself and those I go afield with,how others think I cannot comment on although I have been with people that were cruel and wasteful and with whom I would no longer associate with as far as hunting and fishing were concerned.I might also add that there is a up side to these exotic hunts,such as the fact that a demand for such animals will ensure their survival.That may sound selfish or even cruel however it does more to perpetuate a species than all the wailing and hand wringing I see from PETA or the AHS....Would I do a canned hunt? Only if the target were Ben Laden or his ilk. Is that being blood thirsty or inhumane...Ask him,he is the expert.
25 posted on 12/09/2003 8:21:13 AM PST by Papabear47
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To: elbucko
While I agree in principle, and I don't ever hire a guide, and insist on tying my own flies and loading my own ammo, still I must disagree with your conclusion.

Firstly, it runs counter to the truism that if it flies, floats or fornicates, then it is cheaper to rent it. And we are free market supporters, aren't we?

Secondly, the animals in the "hunts" are not going to be supported for the rest of their lives by sweet lil' grannies willing to foot the bills for their upkeep.

Lions, for example, breed like alley cats. Got kittens? How about lion kittens? Think any neighbor will give them a home?

As for the spear hunting, any hunter using a spear on a lion may so do without intereference from me. Such a hunter is either a vastly better hunter than I or is channelling an ancient Norse berserker.

In the latter case, can I watch when the PETA Person starts the usual badmouthing at the next spear hunt? Please?? Can I bring my camcorder???
26 posted on 12/09/2003 8:34:59 AM PST by GladesGuru (In a society predicated upon liberty, it is essential to examine principles - -)
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To: presidio9
You might as well play a computer game the way some of these hunts are rigged. The sport is called "HUNTING" not shooting.
27 posted on 12/09/2003 8:35:18 AM PST by tiki
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Comment #28 Removed by Moderator

To: Papabear47
Welcome to FR.

FMCDH

29 posted on 12/09/2003 8:53:52 AM PST by nothingnew (The pendulum is swinging and the Rats are in the pit!)
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To: nothingnew
Thank you.
30 posted on 12/09/2003 9:25:38 AM PST by Papabear47
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To: presidio9
Actually, this is nothing new. My dad stopped hunting back in the 50s after he was invited to go "hunting" with a group of guys who sat in a blind, in comfortable chairs, with beers close at hand, and waited for some beaters to herd tame deer through an open shooting area.

"Hunters" like this need to become targets. IMHO.

31 posted on 12/09/2003 9:29:30 AM PST by r9etb
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To: farmfriend
ping
32 posted on 12/09/2003 10:06:02 AM PST by Libertarianize the GOP (Ideas have consequences)
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To: presidio9; AAABEST; Ace2U; Alamo-Girl; Alas; alfons; amom; AndreaZingg; Anonymous2; ...
Rights, farms, environment ping.

Let me know if you wish to be added or removed from this list.
I don't get offended if you want to be removed.

33 posted on 12/09/2003 10:10:42 AM PST by farmfriend ( Isaiah 55:10,11)
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To: farmfriend
BTTT!!!!!
34 posted on 12/09/2003 10:11:46 AM PST by E.G.C.
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To: Kenton
Why even call it hunting? This is no more sporting than walking out to the pasture and shooting a cow. It I were to hunt exotic game, 90% of the fun would be going to exotic places. The other 10% would be trying to get your gun and trophies back into the U.S. through customs.
35 posted on 12/09/2003 10:32:42 AM PST by Blood of Tyrants (Even if the government took all your earnings, you wouldn’t be, in its eyes, a slave.)
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To: Big Midget
"Sure, we could outlaw all these 'canned' hunting operations. But if we do, where does a guy like me go to kill koalas and pandas?"


36 posted on 12/09/2003 10:38:08 AM PST by Bluntpoint
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To: Blood of Tyrants
Why even call it hunting? This is no more sporting than walking out to the pasture and shooting a cow

I didn't stand up for the practice. I just sneered at the article because it was written by Cleveland Amory's buttboy Wayne Pacelli. I will usually find some way to take issue with nearly everything one of these animal-rights zealots stand for.

37 posted on 12/09/2003 10:41:15 AM PST by Kenton (This space for rent)
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To: GladesGuru
Spear hunters are pussys. Real men and women strangle their kills.


38 posted on 12/09/2003 10:43:21 AM PST by Bluntpoint
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To: presidio9
"Many are obtained at exotic animal auctions. A sale at one auction last year included zebras, camels, ostriches, kangaroos and lion cubs"

And those who bought the animals and ran the shows were promptly busted.

I agree caging an animal up so you can 'hunt' it is a 'sport' for wussies. Real hunters don't do such things.

39 posted on 12/09/2003 10:46:10 AM PST by MEGoody
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To: presidio9
But in this fight, animal advocates are not alone. A good many hunters also find the practice abhorrent.

Count me in that category. I have been a hunter for 20+ years. If I manage to get a shot at a deer, it is because I have prepared and am somewhat lucky. A deer 'harvested' by me or my friends is food on the table.

What these people are doing is not hunting. It is a twisted arcade game with live animals ... essentially, organized poaching.

40 posted on 12/09/2003 10:48:57 AM PST by spodefly (This is my tagline. There are many like it, but this one is mine.)
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To: MEGoody
Dipsville Ohio Petting Zoo opens gates for guided hunts. You to can "harvest" a specimen like Mr. Mortimer Snerd below.

While he did not kill animal with first shot, Ole Mortimer spent the rest of the day tracking his trophy.

Mortimer: "You would be surprised how far a wounded animal can travel in one of them acre pens!


41 posted on 12/09/2003 10:51:10 AM PST by Bluntpoint
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To: presidio9
About a year ago, I was invited to attend a "canned" hunt, no cost to me, through a business contact. I went with some reservations, and will not go again.

Really it is an old farm boy thing. If you already have it caught, why not just chop its head off and toss it in the pot? I understand that this type of hunt is big in Europe, and is gaining in popularity in the US. Personally, I find hunting wild game in the wild a much more enjoyable past time. However this practice SHOULD NOT be banned. For some it is the only way they will get a chance to hunt.
42 posted on 12/09/2003 10:52:56 AM PST by redgolum
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To: ThinkLikeWaterAndReeds
I saw a film of a black leopard that had been declawed and released from a cage in front of some "good ol' boys" with a dozen dogs. The dogs promptly tore the leopard apart and the owners cheered and stood with one foot on the leopard in victory. Now that is a real bunch of men.

I saw that same film you are talking about, it was on TV a few years back. If I remember correctly, it was a complete setup.

It was filmed by an animal rights group (PETA or USHS) surrepticiously, using "undercover hunters" (animal-rights agents provocateurs) who found some guy running a sleazy exotic game hunting operation in Texas and engineered what they knew would be a very controversial "hunt".

It was really pretty sickening, wasn't it? I mean, I've hunted for boar on game preserves, but I've never seen anything as disgusting as that film.

Even more disturbing is the fact that that leopard was killed so that the "animal rights" people could make the film. It was sacrificed in the name of publicity for PETA.

43 posted on 12/09/2003 10:56:02 AM PST by Kenton (This space for rent)
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To: Kenton
Slob hunters should be executed!!!!


44 posted on 12/09/2003 11:00:08 AM PST by Bluntpoint
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To: Bluntpoint
I wish I could have seen the pic. Oh well, rest assured that I execute them every chance I get.
45 posted on 12/09/2003 11:04:45 AM PST by Kenton (This space for rent)
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To: spectr17; Varmint Al; wardaddy; TEXASPROUD; chookter; Possenti; SLB; Jeff Head; Trailer Trash; ...
Hunters ping...........Stay Safe !
46 posted on 12/09/2003 11:05:09 AM PST by Squantos (Support Mental Health !........or........ I'LL KILL YOU !!!!)
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To: ChrisCoolC
Yeah, just because they can buy the gun doesn't mean they can shoot it. I regularly shoot pigs around here with a .308, sometimes across fields, and 150 grain Barnes X bullets work fine. Up close, I use an old .375 that I am fond of, but I have not lost a pig yet at 150-250 yards. I use high quality bullets and I shoot carefully. I regularly see people with huge magnums with scopes on them that you could use to examine the surface of Mars dump 20+ rounds in the general direction of a pig and hit nothing. Two years ago I knew (socially) several great white hunters who took a bunch of magnums out to hunt "trophy pigs". One of them got nibbled on a bit after running out of ammunition and being to fat to climb a tree. He had taken out 60 rounds of .338 Win Mag. Damn. The landowner found the pig by hearing the shreiking (he though that it was his ten year old daughter, not a 6'2" grown man) and driving across fields to get to the woods in a pickup truck, nearly killing himself in the process. He dispatched the pig with a .30-30. The pig had a few flesh wounds. Now I am not a huge fan of the .338 Win Mag (I hate the sudden recoil), but I have never had one suggest that at <20 yards it will not put down game. The chewed-up fat guy was in the hospital for a few days and his legs still look kind of weird. He has since lost a lot of weight and now hunts with me. After this he learned how to shoot. He does admit that it would have been a good idea to learn before he went out after a 450 pound boar.
47 posted on 12/09/2003 11:23:33 AM PST by bitterTexas
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To: elbucko
I agree, but the author better watch what he prays for because some number of those canned hunt species may be kept off the endangered or extinct list by the breeding incentive provided by the practice...
48 posted on 12/09/2003 11:34:13 AM PST by Axenolith (<tag>)
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To: Squantos
Exotic Hunting Ranches provide an excellent place to preserve the gene pools of rare animals that are losing some of their home ranges. Breeding and maintaining these animals for profit will assure their continued existence. I don't hunt these ranches, but do not want others from doing so.

Like Rush says, if you want an animal species to prosper, harvest it for food. Are cows, sheep, and pigs anyway near becoming extinct? 

The New York Times has become nothing more than one of the scandal check-out-stand papers and this stupid article adds to the proof.

Good Hunting... from Varmint Al
Varmint Al's Hunting Page

 

49 posted on 12/09/2003 11:35:55 AM PST by Varmint Al
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To: Varmint Al
if you want an animal species to prosper, harvest it for food. Are cows, sheep, and pigs anyway near becoming extinct?

Bumper Sticker Material !!!

Agree Al....I harvest game for food , not trophy...... (albeit I do have a Jackalope on the wall at work). The only "trophy" I ever kept was a mountain lion that tried to make me her dinner. She's on the wall of my den now.

I do dislike hunting over bait. If one is gonna do such they may as well just get their venison in the mail IMO. The "hunt" is the experience.....not the "wait".

Stay Safe !

50 posted on 12/09/2003 11:45:06 AM PST by Squantos (Support Mental Health !........or........ I'LL KILL YOU !!!!)
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