Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Ancient site hints at first US settlers
newscientist ^ | 01/04/04 | NewScientist.com news service

Posted on 01/02/2004 8:02:29 AM PST by Pikamax

Ancient site hints at first US settlers

15:03 02 January 04

NewScientist.com news service

Stone-age people lived in the lands north of the Arctic Circle before the last Ice Age - much earlier than had been thought, suggests new findings.

The discovery of the site in eastern Siberia also hints that people might have moved from the Old World into the Americas at a much earlier date than believed.

The site along the Yanu River, carbon-dated as 30,000 years old, is twice the age of the oldest previously known Arctic settlement, report Vladimir Pitulko of the Institute for the History of Material Culture in Saint Petersburg, Russia, and colleagues.

The area is about 2000 kilometres from the Bering Strait. This is important as archaeologists have long suspected that some of the earliest Americans may have crossed the Bering land bridge from northeastern Asia. However, scientists had little evidence of Arctic settlements in Asia older than 14,000 years - the age of the earliest Alaskan sites. The age of the Yanu River site shows that people learned to live in the Arctic much earlier, and might have reached Alaska earlier than has been recognized.

"Pitulko's find is exciting because it shows that people were living in an ecosystem that stretched continuously between Asia and North America. If they had wandered a little further eastward...bingo - they could have been the first Americans," Daniel Mann of the Institute of Arctic Biology at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks told New Scientist.

Reindeer bones

Russian geologist Mikhail Dashtzeren found a rhino-horn foreshaft of a spear along the river in 1993. A foreshaft is the detachable piece between the main part of a spear and its point. Dashtzeren guided archaeologists to the site in 2001. Pitulko's team found 383 stone artefacts in the area, as well as many bones from ice-age Siberian animals including mammoths, reindeer, woolly rhino and bison.

The ancient site would have been an open meadow in the river's flood plain when occupied. It is unclear if people lived in the area all year, or only came north in summer to hunt. The abundance of reindeer bones indicates they were the most common food.

The flaked stone tools resemble those from more southerly sites at the time. However, the rhino-horn foreshaft, and two similar ones of mammoth ivory, resemble tools used by the Clovis people who spread over North America about 12,000 years ago and are believed to be the continent's first human settlers.

But archaeologists are wary about linking the two. "It's a fabulous site," David Meltzer of Southern Methodist University in Dallas, told New Scientist. The dates look solid, and "it's tells us that people were in the far north a whole lot earlier than we ever thought."

But he cautions the new settlement and those of the Clovis are separated by 16,000 years and thousands of kilometres.

Journal reference: Science (vol 303, p 52)

Jeff Hecht


TOPICS: News/Current Events; Russia
KEYWORDS: archaeology; arctic; beringstrait; davidmeltzer; economic; ggg; godsgravesglyphs; history; siberia; yanariver

1 posted on 01/02/2004 8:02:30 AM PST by Pikamax
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Pikamax; *Gods, Graves, Glyphs; abner; Alas Babylon!; Andyman; annyokie; bd476; BiffWondercat; ...
Gods, Graves, Glyphs
List for articles regarding early civilizations , life of all forms, - dinosaurs - etc.

Let me know if you wish to be added or removed from this ping list.

2 posted on 01/02/2004 8:10:39 AM PST by farmfriend ( Isaiah 55:10,11)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: farmfriend
Please add me to your ping list-- thanks.
3 posted on 01/02/2004 8:14:26 AM PST by expat_panama (just call me Mr. Grinch.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Pikamax
This subject is already being discussed on the below linked thread.

Arctic Dig Unearths Prehistoric Settlement

4 posted on 01/02/2004 8:16:29 AM PST by blam
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: expat_panama
Consider yourself added. If you ever change your mind, or I get you on the wrong list, just let me know.
5 posted on 01/02/2004 8:16:35 AM PST by farmfriend ( Isaiah 55:10,11)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: LibertyThug
bump for future reading
6 posted on 01/02/2004 8:24:38 AM PST by LibertyThug (Dagny Taggart's Alter Ego)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Pikamax
The site along the Yanu River, carbon-dated as 30,000 years old...

NewScientist.com also has articles about how bad global warming is (Global warming 'kills 160,000 a year').  

OK, let's get this straight.  A 'site' cannot be carbon-dated.  A 'stone' cannot be carbon-dated.  Only 'carbon' can be carbon dated.  Forgive my irritability but every time someone discovers an earliest whatever, some jock wants to make the new record  by 'discovering' an earlier one. 

It's easy.  Some where near the site (dig if you gotta) find some charcoal and date it.  If it ain't a record, keep digging.  Eventually you'll make it to NewScientist.com and who knows, if you can bad mouth dubya enough the Nobel people will give you cash money.

7 posted on 01/02/2004 8:27:59 AM PST by expat_panama (just call me Mr. Grinch.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: farmfriend
put me on your ping list for Gods, Grave, and Glyphs, please?
8 posted on 01/02/2004 10:02:16 AM PST by Old Student (WRM, MSgt, USAF (Ret.))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Pikamax
Daniel Mann of the Institute of Arctic Biology at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks

The climate sorts out certain types for extinction. At the same time the climate allows other types to thrive that wouldn't last a day in normal regions: survivors have a certain practicality in behavior, balanced by a freely floating belief system.

9 posted on 01/02/2004 10:08:25 AM PST by RightWhale (Repeal the Law of the Excluded Middle)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: farmfriend
Add me to the list, if you please!
10 posted on 01/02/2004 10:09:52 AM PST by NukeMan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Pikamax
Does this mean Kennewick Man might be a Rooskie?
11 posted on 01/02/2004 10:14:04 AM PST by Spok ((Just Curious))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Pikamax

12 posted on 01/02/2004 11:02:34 AM PST by mjp
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Professional Engineer
ping
13 posted on 01/02/2004 11:53:34 AM PST by msdrby (US Veterans: All give some, but some give all.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Old Student
Consider yourself added. If you ever change your mind, or I get you on the wrong list, just let me know.
14 posted on 01/02/2004 1:34:18 PM PST by farmfriend ( Isaiah 55:10,11)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: NukeMan
Consider yourself added. If you ever change your mind, or I get you on the wrong list, just let me know.
15 posted on 01/02/2004 1:36:29 PM PST by farmfriend ( Isaiah 55:10,11)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: VOA
...and here.
16 posted on 01/02/2004 9:00:32 PM PST by blam
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: expat_panama
Only 'carbon' can be carbon dated. 

AND only when there is a regional correlation with dendrochonology. If there is no synchronized, overlapping tree-ring record for the area going back an appropriate amount of time, then any carbon dating is merely a guesstimate and may be wildly off.

17 posted on 01/10/2004 4:50:28 PM PST by Swordmaker
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Pikamax
At least the 4th thread on this topic. Russia can't have Alaska back. It was a fair sale.
18 posted on 01/10/2004 4:52:05 PM PST by RightWhale (How many technological objections will be raised?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Swordmaker
AND only when there is a regional correlation with dendrochonology. If there is no synchronized, overlapping tree-ring record for the area going back an appropriate amount of time, then any carbon dating is merely a guesstimate and may be wildly off.

I can't remember where I read it but recently I read a comparison between carbon dating and dendrochonology, using bristle cone pines and carbon dating lost big time. It seems it was off by 10 or 15% possibly more.

19 posted on 01/11/2004 12:57:24 PM PST by Holly_P
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: Spok
"thousands of kilometres" was just a quick rhinocerus ride away in those days...
20 posted on 01/11/2004 1:14:20 PM PST by PoorMuttly ("No jockey was ever ruled "Off" for trying." - W. C. Fields)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: farmfriend

 GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother & Ernest_at_the_Beach
Thanks farmfriend.

Just updating the GGG info, not sending a general distribution.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.


21 posted on 02/20/2012 6:54:39 AM PST by SunkenCiv (FReep this FReepathon!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson