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Hubble Makes Mosaic of 10,000 Galaxies
Yahoo News ^ | 1/08/04 | Deborah Zabarenko

Posted on 01/08/2004 3:49:14 PM PST by Libloather

Hubble Makes Mosaic of 10,000 Galaxies
Thu Jan 8, 1:06 PM ET
By Deborah Zabarenko

ATLANTA (Reuters) - The newest camera on the Hubble Space Telescope has created an unprecedented image of a huge hunk of the sky, including at least 10,000 galaxies, which could help determine how our own Milky Way evolved, astronomers said on Thursday.

The new mosaic is the largest color image ever made by the orbiting telescope, covering an area of the sky about the apparent size of the full moon. This may not sound big, but it is 150 times the size of images made by an earlier survey of galaxies known as the Hubble Deep Field image.

In this case, the size of the picture is important, because narrow, if deep, images of the cosmos can give a misleading impression of what is out there.

"Galaxies are incredibly diverse creatures," Shardha Jogee, an astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, said at a news briefing. "You really need a large sample, otherwise your results get skewed."

The new image, created with Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys, is a patchwork of 63 squares showing the area around the constellation Fornax (The Laboratory Furnace) in the southern hemisphere.

Looking closely with high resolution, scientists found detailed pictures of some 10,000 galaxies, and expect there are thousands of other, fainter galaxies in the same field of view.

Presented at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Atlanta, this research by an international group of scientists is meant to study how galaxies form. This is particularly important for those studying the Milky Way galaxy, which contains Earth, Jogee said.

'VIOLENT RELAXATION'

Because earthly observers are sitting within the Milky Way, their vantage point is better for galaxies outside our own, which can be glimpsed in their entirety.

The international team chose to make a mosaic of the field around Fornax because they already knew the distances to the 10,000 galaxies.

By knowing the distances, astronomers could also know how long light had taken to get from them to the Hubble's camera, enabling them to see the galaxies as they were when the universe was about 4.5 billion years old.

It is currently 13.7 billion years old.

Jogee noted that most of the galaxies in the present-day universe -- more than 70 percent -- appear to be barred spiral galaxies like the Milky Way. These are pinwheel-shaped galaxies with elongated concentrations of stars that funnel gas to the center of the galaxy to fuel furious bursts of star formation.

There are also unbarred spiral galaxies and elliptical galaxies, which look smooth and round. The image also captured galactic mergers, in which stars experienced what astronomers call violent relaxation -- a sort of "stellar amnesia" when stars forget where they were in a galaxy before the merger.

"By putting these different snapshots together, we could really piece together this big puzzle of galaxy evolution," Jogee said.

The galaxy survey is known as GEMS, short for Galaxy Evolution from Morphology and Spectral energy distributions.

Images are available online at http:/www.mpia-hd.mpg.de/homes/bell/press_release/press.html.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Extended News; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: 000; 10; astronmy; galaxies; hubble; mosaic; space

1 posted on 01/08/2004 3:49:14 PM PST by Libloather
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To: Libloather
YEC read later
2 posted on 01/08/2004 3:50:34 PM PST by LiteKeeper
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To: All

Donate Here By Secure Server

3 posted on 01/08/2004 3:52:26 PM PST by Support Free Republic (Hi Mom! Hi Dad!)
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To: Libloather
The newest camera on the Hubble Space Telescope has created an unprecedented image of a huge hunk of the sky...

The new mosaic is the largest color image ever made by the orbiting telescope, covering an area of the sky about the apparent size of the full moon.

Huh?

4 posted on 01/08/2004 3:58:29 PM PST by rickmichaels
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To: rickmichaels
Huh?

I'm not a telescope genius, but obviously if you've assembled an image (I assume in a computer) with enough pixels to display 10,000 galaxies, that's a huge chunk of the sky.

A lot of pixels anyway.

5 posted on 01/08/2004 4:02:25 PM PST by narby (McGovern lost in 72 - and launched the left's takover of the Dem party)
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To: narby
It's a huge hunk of the universe, not of the sky.
6 posted on 01/08/2004 4:03:44 PM PST by rickmichaels
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To: Libloather
I'm pretty sure it evolved from a monkey.
7 posted on 01/08/2004 4:04:38 PM PST by PoorMuttly ("Heaven goes by favor. If it went by merit, you would stay out and your dog would go in." -- Twain)
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To: rickmichaels
The new mosaic is the largest color image ever made by the orbiting telescope, covering an area of the sky about the apparent size of the full moon.

Huh?


That would be a circle 1/2 degree in diameter, less than your little fingernail at arm's length.

(There are LOTS of galaxies out there.)
8 posted on 01/08/2004 4:04:41 PM PST by Atlas Sneezed
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To: Libloather

'VIOLENT RELAXATION'

That sounds like a description of Hillary's Testicular Lock Box...
9 posted on 01/08/2004 4:07:59 PM PST by COBOL2Java (If you can read this, thank a teacher. If you are reading this in English, thank a soldier.)
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To: Libloather
http://www.mpia-hd.mpg.de/homes/bell/press_release/press.html
10 posted on 01/08/2004 4:10:59 PM PST by COBOL2Java (If you can read this, thank a teacher. If you are reading this in English, thank a soldier.)
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To: Beelzebubba
This figure shows the layout of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys fields which are stitched together to form the largest color mosaic ever taken by HST. The numbered tiles are the GEMS tiles, the inner tiles are from the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey, and are used to complete the full moon-sized color image. The small black outline shows the size of the Hubble Deep Field North for comparison. The field is in the constellation of Fornax in the Southern Hemisphere, and the full moon is overlaid for comparison.
SOURCE: the GEMS collaboration

11 posted on 01/08/2004 4:13:08 PM PST by COBOL2Java (If you can read this, thank a teacher. If you are reading this in English, thank a soldier.)
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To: narby
click here
12 posted on 01/08/2004 4:14:25 PM PST by Dog Gone
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To: Libloather
Try this
13 posted on 01/08/2004 4:20:06 PM PST by BigLittle
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To: rickmichaels
What are the odds that only earth has life in the entire universe?
14 posted on 01/08/2004 4:20:14 PM PST by waterstraat
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To: waterstraat
Don't know. What are they?
15 posted on 01/08/2004 4:24:58 PM PST by rickmichaels
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To: Dog Gone
Kewl!
16 posted on 01/08/2004 4:25:25 PM PST by aught-6
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To: waterstraat
What are the odds that only earth has life in the entire universe?

Considering only such life as might be considered intelligent: very high for this galaxy by itself. For other galaxies, it doesn't matter since there won't be contact any time soon, sub-space FTL tunneling notwithstanding.

17 posted on 01/08/2004 4:28:56 PM PST by RightWhale (Repeal the Law of the Excluded Middle)
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To: Libloather
What are the chances of SETI picking up a transmission/radio waves cast out into space from some distant planet in the form of a I Love Lucy TV show?

And if their SETI observers picked up our radio waves of that show, what response would they try to send us?

18 posted on 01/08/2004 4:52:58 PM PST by waterstraat
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To: rickmichaels
I followed the link at the end,

http:/www.mpia-hd.mpg.de/homes/bell/press_release/press.html

and was rewarded with some lovely images of galaxies.

(This is something that would have been frustrating on my Mac until today; if anyone else is using Internet Explorer on a Mac, run--do not walk--to upgrade to a better browser (in my case, upgrading from 10.0 to 10.3 (panther), and using Apple's own Safari. On the Mac, IE is amazingly slow in comparison.)

I think the high power of an astronomical telescope is only practical in a very narrow field of view. Much smaller, apparently, than the FOV covered by the moon . . .

19 posted on 01/08/2004 5:15:01 PM PST by conservatism_IS_compassion (Belief in your own objectivity is the essence of subjectivity.)
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To: COBOL2Java
So why'd they skip the area between 13 and 14?
20 posted on 01/08/2004 5:17:34 PM PST by lepton
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To: lepton
So why'd they skip the area between 13 and 14?

It's a matter of National (and World) security. It's where the space Aliens are hiding while creating global warming. I know it's true, I read it on a tabloid cover at the grocery store!

21 posted on 01/08/2004 5:47:21 PM PST by TheBattman (OK- Do it your way - just don't come crying to me when it doesn't work!)
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To: waterstraat
What are the odds that only earth has life in the entire universe?

That will always be a fair question to ponder but let me suggest asking that question from an assumptive position.

What are the odds of other life in the universe ever crossing paths in time and location with life on earth?

Consider that all locations in space are virtually empty and distance is measured in time at the rate of six trillion miles per earth year. The odds that different lives in the universe would cross paths and be within 10-100 million years of each other in time approaches infinity.

22 posted on 01/08/2004 5:59:45 PM PST by MosesKnows
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To: waterstraat
What are the chances of SETI picking up a transmission/radio waves cast out into space from some distant planet in the form of a I Love Lucy TV show? And if their SETI observers picked up our radio waves of that show, what response would they try to send us?

"LooOOoosyyyy..you got some 'splainin' to dooooo!"

23 posted on 01/08/2004 6:13:20 PM PST by Leroy S. Mort
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To: RightWhale
For other galaxies, it doesn't matter since there won't be contact any time soon, sub-space FTL tunneling notwithstanding.

The ONLY way to fly.

24 posted on 01/08/2004 7:22:22 PM PST by Erasmus ("Not to be used for other use")
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To: MosesKnows; waterstraat
The answer to "How many other civilizations of intelligent life there are in our galixy that SETI might find" is found using the "Drake Equation". N=R*fs*fp*ne*fl*fi*fc*L

"R" is the rate of star formation.

"fs" is the fraction of stars that are suitable suns for planetary systems.

"fp" is the number of suitable suns with planetary systems.

"ne" is the mean number of planets that are located within the Continuously Habitable Zone (the zone in a planetary system, where liquid water is possible,assuming liquid water is necessary for life)

"fl" is the fraction of such planets on which life actually originates.

"fi" represents the fraction of such planets on which, after the origin of life, some form of intelligence arises.

"fc" is the fraction of such intelligent species that develop the ability and desire to communicate with other civilizations (they construct radio telescopes or laser systems, etc.)

"L" is the mean lifetime (in years) of a communicative civilization (it doesn't blow itself up or dies off for some reason.

In short, after all is said and done the answer can easily be zero.

25 posted on 01/08/2004 8:09:52 PM PST by Lawgvr1955 (Sic Semper Tyrannus)
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