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Important discoveries in Jingdezhen (Chinese archaeology)
XinHua ^

Posted on 01/28/2004 8:06:02 PM PST by maui_hawaii

Archaeologists have discovered two important sites during an excavation of an imperial kiln at Jingdezhen, a city renowned for its porcelain since the Song Dynasty (960-1279) in South China's Jiangxi Province.

The excavation of the imperial kiln lasting from the Ming (1368-1644) to the Qing (1644-1911) dynasties covered an area of 788 square meters.

One of the sites contained relics from the Jiangxi porcelain company in the late Qing Dynasty. Founded in 1902, the company was the first modern enterprise cooperatively run by officials and businessmen at Jingdezhen.

The second site unearthed was a kiln of the early Ming Dynasty.

"This is the largest group of kilns at an imperial site ever discovered in China," said Li Yiping, deputy director of local porcelain and archaeological institute. "It provides valuable evidences for research on porcelain making skills at the imperial kilns in the early Ming Dynasty."

A 10-cm tall red glazed cup with a 16cm-wide mouth drew the attention of many archaeologists.

"The seal 'Made in Yongle years', the reign of a Ming emperor, at the center of the cup written in zhuanshu, a Chinese calligraphy style, is the most distinct ever found in the world," said Li.

"Even today's modern techniques cannot create such a vibrant red glaze," Li added.

Imperial kilns were the imperial porcelain workshops of China's royalty. Since the Yuan emperor Kublai Khan established a porcelain bureau named Fuliang in 1278, Jingdezhen had been the location of the imperial kilns of the Yuan (1271-1368), Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) dynasty for 632 years until the end of the Qing Dynasty in 1911.

Covering an area of 50,000 square meters, Jingdezhen boasts the largest imperial porcelain workshops with the longest history and the most exquisite workmanship in China.

So far over 3,000 porcelain treasures have been restored from fragments unearthed from Jingdezhen.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Extended News; Miscellaneous; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: archaeology; economic; ggg; godsgravesglyphs; history

1 posted on 01/28/2004 8:06:03 PM PST by maui_hawaii
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To: BJungNan; Lake; Dr. Marten
ping
2 posted on 01/28/2004 8:09:39 PM PST by maui_hawaii (DELL's customer service SUCKS!)
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To: maui_hawaii
ming!
3 posted on 01/28/2004 8:14:52 PM PST by Henchman (I Hench, therefore I am!)
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To: maui_hawaii
Neat,
4 posted on 01/28/2004 8:16:38 PM PST by blam
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To: farmfriend
PING
5 posted on 01/28/2004 8:20:41 PM PST by FairOpinion
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To: FairOpinion
Ying!
6 posted on 01/28/2004 8:52:40 PM PST by fini
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To: maui_hawaii
THANKS.

I love ceramics.
7 posted on 01/28/2004 9:15:07 PM PST by Quix (Choose this day whom U will serve: Shrillery & demonic goons or The King of Kings and Lord of Lords)
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To: maui_hawaii; *Gods, Graves, Glyphs; A.J.Armitage; abner; adam_az; AdmSmith; Alas Babylon!; ...
Gods, Graves, Glyphs
List for articles regarding early civilizations , life of all forms, - dinosaurs - etc.

Let me know if you wish to be added or removed from this ping list.

8 posted on 01/28/2004 9:27:16 PM PST by farmfriend ( Isaiah 55:10,11)
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To: Quix
Couldn't find any pics at any of the China Daily links, though.

Rats.
9 posted on 01/28/2004 9:31:03 PM PST by Quix (Choose this day whom U will serve: Shrillery & demonic goons or The King of Kings and Lord of Lords)
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To: Quix

10 posted on 01/28/2004 9:34:13 PM PST by maui_hawaii (DELL's customer service SUCKS!)
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To: fini
Thanks for the "ying". :)
11 posted on 01/28/2004 9:35:32 PM PST by FairOpinion
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To: farmfriend
The Mysterious Tribe of Tuwa

On the banks of the Kanas Lake, there live 2,000 Tuwas, a Mongolian tribe that have existed in this remote area of northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region for generations. They mainly inhabit the areas of Kanas, Hemu and Baihaba. Their primitive nomadic lifestyle seems to have been isolated from the modern civilization of the 21st century.

They believe in Shamanism and Lamaism and keep the primitive worship of fire and other natural forces as their ancestors did. They offer sacrifices to mountains, waters, Heaven, fire and Aobao (a kind of stone piles).

Tuwa people live a nomad life, residing in yurts or log houses roofed with straws. Due to the geographic conditions and natural environment, the Tuwas' habits and customs are similar to that of the Kazaks and Mongolians. They eat meat and dairy food, such as beef, mutton, milk, yogurt and milk-wine, in addition to potatoes and other vegetables.

They celebrate not only the Mongolian Aobao Festival but also the Spring Festival and Lantern Festival of Han Chinese. Every spring, they drive their herds of cows and sheep to leave their homes and start the grazing trip till July or August, when they would begin to make hays for feeding their livestock in the winter.

It's said that the Tuwas were originated from the old or wounded soldiers abandoned by Genghis Khan when he led his people to expedite westward. Some people hold that they're an independent ethnic group, while others believe they are a branch tribe of the Mongolian ethnic group. Up to now, a Tuwa is registered as a Mongolian when his or her ethnic identity is concerned.

Tuwas have no written language. Their history has been passed down orally from generation to generation. Since there is no written archeological reference, the folk stories have inevitably added mysterious color to the tribe.

Due to the isolation of their residential areas, the Tuwas always marry their close relatives, which has made the quality of the people drop increasingly. According to the governmental prediction, the tribe will possibly disappear within a couple of generations.

(China.org.cn by Chen Lin, January 27, 2004)

12 posted on 01/28/2004 9:35:43 PM PST by blam
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To: maui_hawaii
"Even today's modern techniques cannot create such a vibrant red glaze," Li added.

==

This is impressive.

13 posted on 01/28/2004 9:36:25 PM PST by FairOpinion
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To: farmfriend
When I was in Beijing the last time I went into a shop to look around. The lady was very nice and said she would lock the door...

After which she pulled out a $50,000 bowl. She even showed me the book that her actual bowl was photographed and cited in.

14 posted on 01/28/2004 9:37:38 PM PST by maui_hawaii (DELL's customer service SUCKS!)
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To: farmfriend
Over 50 city sites discovered in central China

Zhengzhou, capital of central China's Henan Province, boasts over 50 city sites from the age of the Five Lords, legendary rulers of remote antiquity, to the Spring and Autumn Period (770-476 BC) and the Warring States Period (475- 221 BC), archaeologists have discovered.

"We have discovered many famous capitals recorded in historical documents in the city sites group in Zhengzhou region, including the city where Huangdi, legendary ruler and earliest ancestor of the Chinese in remote antiquity, lived, the capitals of the Xia Dynasty (2100-1600 BC) under the reign of the Emperors Yu and Qi respectively, and capitals of the early days of the Shang Dynasty (1,600-1,100 BC)," said Zhang Songlin, director of the local cultural relics and archaeological institute.

As the center of the city sites group, the capital of Tang, first emperor of the Shang Dynasty, is the first imperial capital built with city walls, with remains stretching for 12 kilometers still existing.

Named Bo 3,600 years ago, the capital, where the Shang civilization originated, has an advanced layout and ecological equipment, rivaling Babylon, which dated from the same time, said Zhang.

Moreover, except for large-sized state capitals, within the Zhengzhou region of over 7,000 square kilometers, are dozens of kingdom capitals under the emperors from the Western Zhou Dynasty (1,100-771 BC) to the Spring and Autumn Period and the Warring States Period.

The concentration of ancient city sites in Zhouzheng fully proves that before the Qin Dynasty (221-206 BC), The first feudal dynasty in Chinese history, the Zhengzhou region had been the political, economic, cultural and military center of China.

"It's mainly because of the importance of Zhengzhou's location where the Yellow River, mother river of the Chinese, flows from the Loess highlands into the North China Plain, an ideal place for an ancient Chinese society," said Zhang.

"The city sites group in Zhengzhou will provide materials for research on China's ancient cities and on the origins of Chinese civilization," said Zhu Shiguang, director of the China Ancient City Society and professor of Shaanxi Normal University.

Xinhua

15 posted on 01/28/2004 9:38:48 PM PST by blam
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To: FairOpinion

16 posted on 01/28/2004 9:43:37 PM PST by maui_hawaii (DELL's customer service SUCKS!)
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To: blam

"The seal 'Made in Yongle years', the reign of a Ming emperor...

Thats a painting of the Zhu Di, otherwise known as Emperor Yong Le.

17 posted on 01/28/2004 9:50:12 PM PST by maui_hawaii (DELL's customer service SUCKS!)
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To: blam
Another example of their work:


18 posted on 01/28/2004 9:54:06 PM PST by maui_hawaii (DELL's customer service SUCKS!)
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To: blam
That emperor also built the Forbidden City, more or less.
19 posted on 01/28/2004 10:00:05 PM PST by maui_hawaii (DELL's customer service SUCKS!)
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To: maui_hawaii
Ming ping!
20 posted on 01/28/2004 10:02:00 PM PST by sfRummygirl (Tancredo in '04)
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To: blam
Cool thread!
21 posted on 01/28/2004 10:05:36 PM PST by sfRummygirl (Tancredo in '04)
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To: maui_hawaii
Bump
22 posted on 01/28/2004 10:12:21 PM PST by Dan(9698)
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To: maui_hawaii
These are amazing.

Thanks for introducing me to the site. I bookmarked it.

http://www.artigua.com

23 posted on 01/28/2004 10:20:47 PM PST by FairOpinion
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To: maui_hawaii
"After which she pulled out a $50,000 bowl. She even showed me the book that her actual bowl was photographed and cited in."

==

Wow! I bet at times like that you wish you had some of Trump's or Buffet's wealth.
24 posted on 01/28/2004 10:22:40 PM PST by FairOpinion
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To: maui_hawaii
THANKS MUCH.

Any link to more?

Beautiful example.
25 posted on 01/28/2004 10:22:53 PM PST by Quix (Choose this day whom U will serve: Shrillery & demonic goons or The King of Kings and Lord of Lords)
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To: FairOpinion
There are some better ones than that.

At one time I had a working list of Asian Art web pages, but when the old laptop died so did it.

I will keep you in mind when I find more...

I have also seen some very good Asian Art books and magazines.

I know a little about Chinese art, but some of the sites go into "Asian" art in general.

Go to your local public library. It very well might have lots of info on this stuff.

I also very much enjoy Chinese calligraphy. I am more knowlegeable on that than say some of the details of porcelain.

26 posted on 01/28/2004 10:27:09 PM PST by maui_hawaii (DELL's customer service SUCKS!)
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To: Quix
I can post lots more. Tommorrow...

I have to work in the morning :^)

27 posted on 01/28/2004 10:27:51 PM PST by maui_hawaii (DELL's customer service SUCKS!)
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To: maui_hawaii
"I will keep you in mind when I find more..."

==

I appreciate it, please let me know if you find others.

Chinese calligraphy... must be fascinating.

28 posted on 01/28/2004 10:30:31 PM PST by FairOpinion
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To: FairOpinion
You cannot take those pieces out of China. So even if you DO have the money, unless you feel like some hard time, don't even think about it. They will also take the thing back and you'd be stuck out the money.

You can own it, just not take it out of China.

To take those kinds of things outside of China is a crime (really, not figuratively) in China.

Of course the govt often sponsors some 'tours' of art where they approve things for loan or whatever...

They can be appreciated just fine by visiting a museum. Its cheaper too.

When you get beyond the outlying stuff things start to get REALLY interesting.

I can try to get you a start if you want...

29 posted on 01/28/2004 10:33:18 PM PST by maui_hawaii (DELL's customer service SUCKS!)
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To: maui_hawaii
"I can try to get you a start if you want..."

==

Thanks, I would appreciate it. I always had an interest, but am re-adjusting my time to take time to learn more about interesting things such as ancient art and archeology. Asian and Chinese art is very interesting -- just from this article, the craftmanship, that even today is not duplicated, as that comment about the colors indicates.
30 posted on 01/28/2004 10:37:37 PM PST by FairOpinion
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To: FairOpinion
link

Click the calligraphy link once you get into that page

There are 5 basic categories of calligraphy...

I will be back tommorrow though...

31 posted on 01/28/2004 10:38:18 PM PST by maui_hawaii (DELL's customer service SUCKS!)
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To: maui_hawaii
"There are 5 basic categories of calligraphy..."

Thanks! :)


32 posted on 01/28/2004 11:02:47 PM PST by FairOpinion
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To: maui_hawaii
Some set of bowls!
33 posted on 01/31/2004 6:20:08 PM PST by Henchman (I Hench, therefore I am!)
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Just updating the GGG information, not sending a general distribution.
To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list. Thanks.
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the
"Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list or GGG weekly digest
-- Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

34 posted on 04/11/2006 1:05:17 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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