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My Daughter, the Blogger-exposed teacher for mistreating her to the whole cyberworld
FrontPageMagazine.com | February 25, 2004 | Catherine Seipp

Posted on 02/25/2004 5:23:45 AM PST by SJackson

How my 14-year-old exposed her teacher for mistreating her -- to the whole cyberworld.

My 14-year-old daughter's blog now gets more hits and links than mine, I'm happy to say. In fact at one point she and I together occupied nine out of the top 10 spaces in Journalspace traffic, and the day of her Instalanche she alone brought in 1/3 of all Journalspace hits. All because of her blog entry earlier this month about how her English teacher had ridiculed her in front of the class for writing an un-p.c. paper.

I've heard what happens when the mighty Instapundit's Glenn Reynolds links you but never seen it up close, and it really is amazing: From 100 hits a day (typical for a teenager's blog) to 100 an hour, with links to dozens of other blogs and around 300 posted comments from Edinburgh to Aukland. (The post counter reads 96 when I last checked , but that's because once this comments server reaches 200 it begins counting backwards.)

For anyone who's interested in the continuing story of Cecile at school, here's an excerpt from a recent entry:

"Background checks--needed. In sixth grade, I had a nice coach who shared my passion for Buffy the Vampire Slayer. But there was something peculiar in him. He always seemed to enjoy flirting with some blonde high school students. And by February of that school year, he was in jail awaiting trial for statuatory rape.

"In seventh grade, I had a nice but airheaded history teacher who decided to teach us less than a month of Roman Empire history and more than three months of African and Islamic History. She also repetitively told us the many ways Israeli troops were ruthless. On a project on the middle east, I compiled countless sources including pamphlets by David Horowitz and articles from National Review and Weekly Standard. Unsurprisingly, she called me to her desk once and basically said, 'I don't like your attitude'....Thankfully, the next year, she went abroad to 'save Tibet.'"

Samizdata's Brian Micklethwait, who originally linked Cecile's post, noted last week on his own education blog that he's starting to feel sorry for the English teacher: "I realise that she's probably her own worst enemy, but Cecile runs her a close second. What the old USSR used to call the "correlation of forces" has definitely tilted in that relationship."

Anyway, the back story: My daughter, whose nom de blog is Cecile DuBois, wrote a paper about Mary Wollstonecraft arguing that modern American women have achieved equal rights, and also that the pioneering feminist would have frowned upon contemporary concerns like "banal women's studies classes." The teacher was shocked, began a discussion of affirmative action for women and minorities, and described Cecile as racist not only in front of the whole class but also (according to reports from other kids later) to all the classes she taught that day.

By the way, this is not to say that I think my daughter's paper was above criticism. As Cecile put it on her blog: "Since I was stuck on the spot with my futile attempts to convince the class I was not racist and mentally sane, I moved on to the second parapraph of my 'paper' that even my mother said had weak arguments...afterwards [the teacher] thanked me casually, as if I were heretical, for sharing my 'interesting opinions.'"

Samizdata, a group blog of British libertarians, immediately began a Support Cecile DuBois campaign, along with our blogger friend Jackie D, a young American living in the U.K. who'd introduced us to the Samizdaters when we were in London over Christmas. A day later Instapundit picked up the story, and the outpouring of already sizeable support Cecile had gotten via Samizdata quadrupled.

I suppose that tales of students humiliated by teachers for dissenting from the prevailing groupthink always touch a chord. As Michael Jennings, another Samizdata contributor, observed on his own blog: "I think the moral of this story may be that there are a great many people in the blogosphere whose lives really sucked when they were 14 and in high school." That's certainly true. But there are a few other morals as well in this story of a Los Angeles teenager whose bad day at school on Friday got the attention of a bunch of London libertarians and a Nashville, Tenn. law professor by Sunday.

One is that the Internet really has folded certain corners of the planet into the small town of Blogville, Planet Earth; conversely, the traditonally small, closed world of high school can no longer be so small and closed - not when any kid can find countless informed opinions that differ from what the teacher thinks with just a few mouse clicks.

This can be difficult for schools, which I suspect often are entrenched in conventional leftist wisdom simply because they are institutions. A fondness for instructing and improving (in other words, teaching) might be another reason why pedagogy and the left seem to have a natural affinity. In any case, while there are of course many left-of-center bloggers, the rightward tilt of some of the biggest (Instapundit, Andrew Sullivan, Eugene Volokh, proto-blogger Matt Drudge, etc.) has been noticed - and complained about - from the beginning. Especially by traditional media, another institution not unsympathetic to liberal orthodoxy.

Blogging is essentially an unregulated, free-agent activity, and that can drive people who prefer rules and regulations and decision-by-committee crazy. From its earliest days, I noticed a tone of disapproval towards bloggers that reminded me of school, what with all the carping from magazines like the Nation and the American Prospect about the blogging world's sorry lack of supervision. The tongue-clucking made me think of the teacher's pet constantly raising a hand to protest: "Miss Jones! Miss Jones! Johnny's reading ahead again! Unsupervised!"

I imagine many teachers go into the profession because they want to be inspiring figures who open students' minds, like Sidney Poitier in "To Sir, With Love." That's great when the teacher actually is like Sidney Poitier (and the students are like the underprivileged little know-nothings in the movie.) But what happens when a student's brain has a few ideas in it already and is not simply waiting to be filled with every opinion the teacher has? Well, if the teacher is the exact opposite of the "To Sir, With Love" type, she can try humiliating the student in class. And in the old days, that probably would have worked, because high school pretty much was a student's whole world and such an incident would have seemed like the end of it.

But a teenager with a blog is a teenager whose world has already expanded, sans help from Sidney Poitier wannabes. Much has been written about the dangers of the Internet to teens; I've seen how it can be a safe outlet. Cecile often feels frustrated by what kids her own age want to talk about, and she likes discussing politics and other topics online with various people (law students, soldiers, retired accountants) she's not going to meet in the school cafeteria. I doubt they'd want a 14-year-old in one of their real life hangouts, but on blogs she's a welcome constant commenter.

So even if she hadn't received such an outpouring of support, I think Cecile's regular stops in the blogsophere would have served as an antidote to what happened at school this past Friday. Certainly if a teacher implies a student is a racist idiot one day, and by the next some 200 smart and articulate adults have said she's not and here's why, that rather counteracts the original lesson plan. Now that so many teens have blogs, concerns about doctrinaire teachers may be passe. Our sons and our daughters are beyond their control.

Here are the relevant post links:

http://ceciledubois89.journalspace.com

http://www.brianmicklethwait.com/education/archives/001012.htm

http://www.samizdata.net/blog/archives/005458.html

http://ceciledubois89.journalspace.com/?entryid=840

http://www.jackieblogs.com/archives/001886.html

http://www.instapundit.com/archives/013842.php

http://michaeljennings.blogspot.com


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial
KEYWORDS: bloggers; brainwashing; dissent; indoctrination; indoctrinationcenter; littleredschoolhouse; pc; politicallycorrect; racist; reddupes; reeducation; reeducationcenter; school; sexist; usefulidiots
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1 posted on 02/25/2004 5:23:45 AM PST by SJackson
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To: SJackson
bump for later
2 posted on 02/25/2004 5:28:34 AM PST by zook
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To: SJackson
...and the day of her Instalanche she alone brought in 1/3 of all Journalspace hits.

What is the appropriate gift for a 14-year-old girl's "day of Instalanche"?

3 posted on 02/25/2004 5:28:54 AM PST by PBRSTREETGANG
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To: sneakers
bump
4 posted on 02/25/2004 5:29:26 AM PST by sneakers
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Comment #5 Removed by Moderator

To: PBRSTREETGANG
A package of Oreos ;0)
6 posted on 02/25/2004 5:40:16 AM PST by Chad Fairbanks (What am I rebelling against? Well, what do ya got?)
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To: SJackson
the Internet really has folded certain corners of the planet into the small town of Blogville, Planet Earth; conversely, the traditonally small, closed world of high school can no longer be so small and closed - not when any kid can find countless informed opinions that differ from what the teacher thinks with just a few mouse clicks.

As I've said before; the internet is a conservative's best friend...

7 posted on 02/25/2004 5:40:26 AM PST by Born Conservative (Some mornings it just doesn't seem worth it to gnaw through the leather straps.)
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To: SJackson
"In seventh grade, I had a nice but airheaded history teacher who decided to teach us less than a month of Roman Empire history and more than three months of African and Islamic History."

Brings back memories of my High School years. My AP Engrish teacher had us reading Maya Angelou, Bigger, Why the Caged Bird Sings and so on until I thought only black authors existed.

So much for Macbeth, Grapes of Wrath, etc.,etc..
8 posted on 02/25/2004 5:40:42 AM PST by TSgt (I am proudly featured on U.S. Rep Rob Portman's homepage: http://www.house.gov/portman/)
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To: SJackson
Put that un-pc failing paper up on the web and let others judge its merits.

I love it.
9 posted on 02/25/2004 5:43:28 AM PST by ladylib
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To: SJackson

10 posted on 02/25/2004 5:48:03 AM PST by mhking
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To: SJackson
bump
11 posted on 02/25/2004 5:48:55 AM PST by OldBlondBabe
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To: SJackson
Thankfully, the next year, she went abroad to 'save Tibet.'"

Tranlation: to help the Maoist rebels take over.

12 posted on 02/25/2004 5:55:57 AM PST by JimRed (Disinformation is the leftist's and enemy's friend; consider the source before believing.)
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To: SJackson
I remember being in 9th grade - my Spanish class. The teacher passed out the bookcovers for our books. The bookcovers were supplied by the local army recruiters, and so they had a camo pattern on them.

She immediately told the class that she did not want to see the camo pattern, but rather we should have the blank side facing outward instead because she was "offended" by the "militaristic" bookcovers...

Of course, being a punk kid I had to do the exact opposite of what she wanted, and the following day when I showed up in class she came to my desk, angrily ripped the cover off, and sent me to the office for "insubordination".

In-school suspension for that one. Followed by many in-school suspension days during the remainder of the year for wearing such things as field jackets, t-shirts that read "Let me win your hearts and minds, or I'll burn your damn huts down" and "Hey! I just stepped in some Shiite!" and "Hippies Suck"...

Ahhhh high school. What a fun time, full of great memories... ;0)

13 posted on 02/25/2004 6:00:44 AM PST by Chad Fairbanks (What am I rebelling against? Well, what do ya got?)
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To: MikeWUSAF
My daughter already says "Yeah, another didactic Newberry Award winning piece of white guilt." when I ask her what book she was assigned to read at school.
14 posted on 02/25/2004 6:03:24 AM PST by eno_ (Freedom Lite - it's almost worth defending)
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To: eno_
The kids get it. There is hope.
15 posted on 02/25/2004 6:06:09 AM PST by ladylib
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To: MikeWUSAF
And when I was in high school in the early 1960s, we were stuck with the likes of Silas Marner... which set in me a prejudice against female novelists that took years to shake.

Then, sadly, other than in history where liberalism reigned, the political correctness was conservative. As a sophomore, I had an English teacher who downgraded any work she found inconsistent with her own very fundamentalist religious position. I could understand her not wanting us to read Lawrence Ferlinghetti's quasi-erotic Beat poetry, e.g. The Coney Island of the Mind, which was, however, in my view rather tame and harmless, but, with her, even Theodore Dreiser and H.L. Mencken were taboo. At any rate, I became annoyed when she gave me a "C" on an essay I thought was good, but took a decidedly Menckensian line. So, I took it to the local state college where I knew the head of the English department. He circulated the paper to the department as a college paper, and the comments all came back positive, with no less than an "A-" On my next essary for the old bat, I wrote a purposely bad essay which took positions I knew she would like. Of course, she gave me an "A", while the state college English department thought it, at best, a "D-" effort. I then dropped copies of both papers with the college professors' comments on her desk, and on the principal's.

Fun was had by all.

16 posted on 02/25/2004 6:23:10 AM PST by CatoRenasci (Ceterum Censeo [Gallia][Germania][Arabia] Esse Delendam --- Select One or More as needed)
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To: SJackson
the traditonally small, closed world of high school can no longer be so small and closed - not when any kid can find countless informed opinions that differ from what the teacher thinks with just a few mouse clicks.

This can be difficult for schools, which I suspect often are entrenched in conventional leftist wisdom simply because they are institutions

What's the antidote to Bad Free Speech ?

More Free Speech.

17 posted on 02/25/2004 7:12:36 AM PST by happygrl
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To: Chad Fairbanks
>>"Let me win your hearts and minds, or I'll burn your damn huts down" and "Hey! I just stepped in some Shiite!" and "Hippies Suck"... <<

LOL! And she thought the camo cover would offend her!
18 posted on 02/25/2004 7:53:04 AM PST by netmilsmom (Don't put a question mark where God put a period.)
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To: SJackson
When I was in middle school(8th grade), my science teacher taught from a textbook that turned out to be primarily about how the world was going to fill up with trash, and how we should all recycle. One day I asked an embarrassing question(embarrassing to him, obviously): if recycling was such a good idea why don't companies mine old trash dumps for valuable materials to recycle? The next thing you know I was put in the back of the class next to the door, all by myself.

I spent the rest of that year asking questions like that of the teacher and pretty much making him look like a fool when he had no answer or his answer contradicted the book. I had no idea at the time I was a conservative; I was just taking the information given to me and trying to make sense out of it by asking questions. I ended up getting a B in the class. I had aced every test by putting down the answers I knew he wanted, so when I asked why I got a B, he said I lost points due to lack of class participation in discussions! LOL. Apparently only politically correct responses counted towards those points.
19 posted on 02/25/2004 8:09:16 AM PST by The Enlightener
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To: The Enlightener
My own similar story doesn;t have to do with any type of political stuff; but back in 9th grade my history teacher, Mr. Vinson, was a great guy. But it was history; I mean, all I had to do was read the book and aced every test. 90% of my time in class was spent turned around talking to my friend Verlin. When our report cards came out, I had an A+ and the comment, "Does not pay attention." I tried to convince my parents why the contradiction. :)
20 posted on 02/25/2004 8:31:49 AM PST by TheBigB ("Flash, don't heckle the super-villain!" (John "Green Lantern" Stewart))
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To: PBRSTREETGANG
"What is the appropriate gift for a 14-year-old girl's "day of Instalanche"?"

A large, square-ended, flat-bottomed shovel comes to mind.

21 posted on 02/25/2004 8:32:40 AM PST by Redbob
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To: MikeWUSAF
"So much for Macbeth, Grapes of Wrath, etc.,etc.."

PC is not that new a phenom: when I was going to school in Oklahoma, "Grapes of Wrath" was banned in the public schools!

Of course, that was around the time Okie self-esteem was so low that billboards alongside the road would say things like "Oklahoma is OK!"

22 posted on 02/25/2004 8:39:24 AM PST by Redbob
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To: netmilsmom
In the sixth grade, I had a male "Social Studies" teacher who was apparently also a bodybuilder. I remember him asking the class one day what languages had contributed heavily to English.

"German" and "Latin," came the replies. I put my hand up.

"French," I offered.

"No, that's wrong," he said. "French didn't really add anything to English."

Although I did not know why, precisely, in the sixth grade, I knew I was right. In later years I would think back on that episode and think "Gee, Mr. Latsha, ever heard of 1066? Battle of Hastings? Any of this a-ringin' a bell?!?"

23 posted on 02/25/2004 8:56:58 AM PST by Oberon (What does it take to make government shrink?)
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To: SJackson
read later
24 posted on 02/25/2004 9:17:23 AM PST by LiteKeeper
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To: Born Conservative
Yeah, well Captain Planet is a teacher's best friend. Captain Planet teaches kids to worry endlessly about Mother Earth and how we're poluting it. He teaches kids to conduct little environmental project for the good of the world community.
25 posted on 02/25/2004 10:12:47 AM PST by GigaDittos (Bumper sticker: "Vote Democrat, it's easier than getting a job.")
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To: CatoRenasci
And when I was in high school in the early 1960s, we were stuck with the likes of Silas Marner... which set in me a prejudice against female novelists that took years to shake.

Ugh! Deadly dull for a teenage boy. I hated every word of it.

26 posted on 02/25/2004 10:25:37 AM PST by Ditto ( No trees were killed in sending this message, but billions of electrons were inconvenienced.)
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To: TheBigB
Ah, yes. In 6th grade, class was so boring that I read the Encyclopaedia Britannica under my desk instead of paying attention. Much more interesting. Of course, I aced all the tests and had the answer whenever called upon.

The teacher hated me and was most unpleasant. He was a poster child for the ills of tenure described by Max Rafferty in Suffer Little Children! In fact, reading that book under my desk in class got me sent to the principal's office! LOL!! He pulled a few too many impermissable stunts with me and a couple of other kids (including one he didn't realize had an uncle on the Board of Education), and ended up with the choice of being fired or teaching the retarded. He finished his 30 years faithfully (??) putting in his time in a special education classroom. I always felt those poor kids, who wouldn't know the difference, deserved better.

27 posted on 02/25/2004 11:02:34 AM PST by CatoRenasci (Ceterum Censeo [Gallia][Germania][Arabia] Esse Delendam --- Select One or More as needed)
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To: Ditto
I'm sure this is heresy, but, for the most part, I am not a fan of the 19th century English novel. Oh, I like some Scott and some Hardy, but I can't stand George Elliot or Dickens. Disraeli was a mediocre novelist and Trollope generally bores me after an hour or so. I much prefer American novelists like Twain and Cooper, Germans like Goethe, Fontane and Mann, or even Froggie Proust!
28 posted on 02/25/2004 11:07:19 AM PST by CatoRenasci (Ceterum Censeo [Gallia][Germania][Arabia] Esse Delendam --- Select One or More as needed)
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To: CatoRenasci
I much prefer American novelists like Twain and Cooper, Germans like Goethe, Fontane and Mann, or even Froggie Proust!

I agree. The 19th Century Brits were tedious. American were vivid.

29 posted on 02/25/2004 11:10:21 AM PST by Ditto ( No trees were killed in sending this message, but billions of electrons were inconvenienced.)
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To: The Enlightener
If recycling was such a good idea why don't companies mine old trash dumps for valuable materials to recycle?

Holy cow. That is the best statement on recycling I've ever heard. I'll use it myself the next time I get into a discussion on the subject.

Excellent!

30 posted on 02/25/2004 11:20:11 AM PST by Jotmo ("Voon", said the mattress.)
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To: Ditto
The 19th Century Brits were tedious.

You need to try on a little Kipling, sir, if you haven't lately. A few hours of Kim or Captains Courageous can really help.

31 posted on 02/25/2004 7:24:15 PM PST by Oberon (What does it take to make government shrink?)
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To: Oberon
You need to try on a little Kipling, sir.

Have you ever Kippled? ;~))

32 posted on 02/26/2004 4:53:08 AM PST by Ditto ( No trees were killed in sending this message, but billions of electrons were inconvenienced.)
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To: nuconvert
ping
33 posted on 02/26/2004 5:01:01 AM PST by Pan_Yans Wife (Your friend is your needs answered. --- Kahlil Gibran)
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To: SJackson
bump for later...
34 posted on 02/26/2004 5:04:31 AM PST by Hatteras
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To: Chad Fairbanks
In school suspension. I hear that these days and always laugh. We called that Study Hall. We did not have in school suspension. We had detention hall, which is even more time in school. Then there was real time suspension - don't come back unless/until you bring a parent. Then - when it started to get serious - there was permanent suspension. "7thson, you're seventeen. We don't have to keep you here."
35 posted on 02/26/2004 5:07:39 AM PST by 7thson (I think it takes a big dog to weigh a 100 pounds.)
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To: CatoRenasci
I wish that I had the English text that I read back in high school. There was one story - a sci-fi story - where there was a planet full of blacks. What happened was that when space travel was possible, all the blacks left earth and created a utopian society on a distant planet. Now, the last surviving whites were coming to their planet because they destroyed Earth and were begging forgiveness to come live on that planet. The leaders of the black planet were debating whether they should let this happen. I kid you not - this was a story in the text! Even back then, I knew that was full of it.
36 posted on 02/26/2004 5:12:24 AM PST by 7thson (I think it takes a big dog to weigh a 100 pounds.)
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To: TheBigB
I believe it was the ninth grade, in History. The teachers name was Mrs. Layman. You always remember the names of the good ones. Anyway, one day some skank of a girl was misbehaving and Mrs. Layman instructed her to straighten up. The skank said the classroom was like communism. Mrs. Layman became furios. She verbally lit into that skank for about 15-20 minutes, explaining the differences between communism and a Constitutional Republic. Made a lasting impression on me. I liked history up to that time but really took a great interest in the subject after that. Especally American History!
37 posted on 02/26/2004 5:24:38 AM PST by 7thson (I think it takes a big dog to weigh a 100 pounds.)
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To: Oberon
Wnen I was in the 4th grade in Blandesburg Elementry, there was a male teacher who looked like Charles Atlas - at least he did to this little 4th grader. I remember one rainy day while we stood in the cafeterria, waiting for school to start. One of the school punks - many existed in that school - was mouthing off. This teacher grabbed him by the shirt front and snatched his arse up in the air, quick. Curled the punk right up to his face and had a "man-to-man."
38 posted on 02/26/2004 5:29:37 AM PST by 7thson (I think it takes a big dog to weigh a 100 pounds.)
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To: TheBigB; BlueLancer; aculeus; general_re; dighton
I had an A+ and the comment, "Does not pay attention." I tried to convince my parents why the contradiction. :)

Ahhh, memories.

Those were the good old days, when grades were based on actual results (test scores), rather than being weighed down by subjective interpretations of what constitututes class participation. I never volunteered answers in classroom discussions, and when called upon, usually responded with a vegetative, "I don't know". What kid wants to be tagged as a know-it-all, except the obnoxious Bill Clinton types.

Too many teachers are like the camp counselors in Addams Family Values. Kids who don't tow the party line risk being sent to the Harmony Hut until they are thoroughly brainwashed and smiling vacuously.

39 posted on 02/26/2004 5:40:57 AM PST by Thinkin' Gal
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To: SJackson
I suppose that tales of students humiliated by teachers for dissenting from the prevailing groupthink always touch a chord.

"When we grew up and went to school, there were certain teachers who would hurt the children any way they could.
By pouring their derision on anything we did. Exposing every weakness however carefully hidden by the kid."

"You can't have any pudding if you don't eat your meat!
How can you you have any pudding if you don't eat your meat!"

"You! Yes, you behind the drapes, kid! Stand still laddie!"

40 posted on 02/26/2004 5:44:23 AM PST by Bloody Sam Roberts (The way that you wander is the way that you choose. The day that you tarry is the day that you lose.)
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To: 7thson
Hmmm. Sounds to me like a politically correct revisionist short story version of Heinlein's Farnham's Freehold.
41 posted on 02/26/2004 5:46:39 AM PST by CatoRenasci (Ceterum Censeo [Gallia][Germania][Arabia] Esse Delendam --- Select One or More as needed)
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To: CatoRenasci; Ditto
Heresy! LOL

I'm not a big fan of Hardy either, and I do love Twain and especially Mann... but to not like Elliot or Trollope...that's just...yeah, it's heresy lol.

Wilkie Collins is another great, as is Thackeray (talk about vivid!) And at the risk of cliche, I love watching the renewal of Austin's well-deserved honor.

...and the Bronte's...
42 posted on 02/26/2004 6:01:31 AM PST by Trinity_Tx (how many ...'s can i put in one post....)
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To: Ditto; Oberon; CatoRenasci
Oh, and don't forget Defoe...

not vivid enough... pshaw...

<G>
43 posted on 02/26/2004 6:07:42 AM PST by Trinity_Tx (how many ...'s can i put in one post....)
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To: 7thson
This was about 18 years ago... They saved the out-of-school suspension for the really bad stuff ;0)
44 posted on 02/26/2004 6:07:45 AM PST by Chad Fairbanks (What am I rebelling against? Well, what do ya got?)
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To: 7thson
True story - the planet is "Africa". Whites there now are reporting that it is a utopia, and that South Africa, in particular, will achieve nirvana just after Mandela dies.

Sheesh! I thought everyone knew this!

45 posted on 02/26/2004 6:16:35 AM PST by 70times7 (An open mind is a cesspool of thought)
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To: Ditto
Have you ever Kippled? ;~))

Every chance I get. I can even quote whole snatches of some of his poems by heart.

However, I have never Quizzled, and don't ever intend to.

46 posted on 02/26/2004 6:23:49 AM PST by Oberon (What does it take to make government shrink?)
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To: 7thson
The skank said the classroom was like communism.

Had I been that teacher, I would have replied something along the lines of "Actually, it's much more like a constitutional monarchy."

47 posted on 02/26/2004 6:26:22 AM PST by Oberon (What does it take to make government shrink?)
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To: 7thson
In school suspension.

I laugh about In school suspension for a different reason. In the mid 70's a classmate named Tom had done something that got him the choice of a 3-day out or one day in school suspension - don't remember what he had done, but he took the in-school. The principal had him spend the entire day in a medium sized room across from the auditorium where the all of the school play costumes were kept. Tom planned well, perhaps he brought brownies with his lunch, I'm not sure, but let's just say he was very happy all day.

I will never forget when Mike, another friend, and I opened the door to that room to check on Tom. He was in that oversized closet with a huge sombrero on his head "flemencoing" around the room. I don't recall if there was a plastic rose in his teeth or not - there may have been. We were roaring.

It was not a particularly effective punishment.

48 posted on 02/26/2004 6:31:48 AM PST by 70times7 (An open mind is a cesspool of thought)
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To: Trinity_Tx
Defoe, of course, is 18th century. And, I do like 18th century English novels: what's not to like in Fielding, Defoe, Swift, or Richardson?

Actually, I do rather like Hardy, it's just so many of those others: Dickens, Elliot, Trollope, Austin and teh Bronte's: for me they're the 19th century equivalent of "chick flicks".

I have enjoyed some Wilkie Collins, and Thackery is not bad. But, give me the vigor of American or German novels of that period almost any time! While adequate in translation, novelists like Fontane, Kleist, Goethe and Mann are all far better in the original German. (tho' I confess to having had a hard time with the plattdeutsch dialect in Effi Briest -- gives me a new appreciation of the difficulties non-native speakers of English must have with the dialect in Twain)

49 posted on 02/26/2004 6:38:43 AM PST by CatoRenasci (Ceterum Censeo [Gallia][Germania][Arabia] Esse Delendam --- Select One or More as needed)
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To: CatoRenasci
Did the positive reviews of your essay by likely leftist-leaning college professors help to improve your grade? I guess you really showed your sophomore English teacher, huh?
50 posted on 02/26/2004 6:44:46 AM PST by O.C. - Old Cracker (When the cracker gets old, you wind up with Old Cracker. - O.C.)
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